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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Karen Lyons, Diana Acsente and Micha van Waesberghe

The purpose of this paper is to share how knowledge management (KM) and quality management can be integrated into a seamless framework and operational model to sustain

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share how knowledge management (KM) and quality management can be integrated into a seamless framework and operational model to sustain excellence in performance, and to explore why working from the practitioners outward when implementing this framework and operational model is an effective practice for enabling employees to provide the highest quality product and solution delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a brief company context, including the knowledge and quality challenges faced in a rapidly growing company where employees are dispersed at many locations and do not often have the opportunity to meet face‐to‐face. It describes a corporate focus on “Knowledge at the Point of Execution”© and why this is critical to ensuring value to employees, clients, and the corporation. An approach for engaging both workforce and leadership and for moving from concept, to strategy, to implementing practices within the existing company culture is discussed.

Findings

This paper presents learnings on some effective approaches for implementing an integrated KM and quality framework and for engaging both workforce and leadership, including communications, events, workshops, and use of KM tools such as story telling, communities of practice, and knowledge assets.

Originality/value

This paper presents practical experience on implementing what the authors believe is a unique integration of KM and quality concepts, strategies, and operating practices. It is written for practitioners who are looking for approaches to improve business performance and maintain high levels of quality in their own projects, initiatives, or customer support efforts.

Details

VINE, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Diana Acsente

The purpose of this paper is to share findings from a literature review conducted during ongoing scholarly research on the characteristics of knowledge workers. This paper

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share findings from a literature review conducted during ongoing scholarly research on the characteristics of knowledge workers. This paper aims to place knowledge workers in the context of twenty‐first century organizations by providing a historical background on the emergence of knowledge work.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature presented in this review is drawn from Google and Google Scholar searches along with the following EBSCO databases: Academic Search Premier, Business Source Premier, MasterFILE Premier, MasterFILE Select, Communication & Mass Media Complete, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, PsycARTICLES, and PsycINFO.

Findings

Much of the literature review for this project comes from the management field. A predominant theme is that capitalizing on the talents of knowledge workers entails creating a culture with a specific set of characteristics chosen to create an environment in which knowledge workers flourish. A common perception is that the effective management of knowledge workers is hindered by the lack of a cohesive definition. The literature review suggests that a set of characteristics exists specific to knowledge workers.

Social implications

The paper posits an increased awareness of twenty‐first century workforce characteristics that need to be taken into consideration as soon as possible by private, public or academic enterprises.

Originality/value

While there is no dispute about the exponential growth of knowledge workers and their critical impact on business, the number of knowledge workers is difficult to gauge due to the lack of a precise definition. Moreover, this workforce is difficult to manage until it is well understood and defined. There is no model to encompass the full spectrum of characteristics that define knowledge workers. A proposed taxonomy of the characteristics of knowledge workers can serve as a springboard for more intensive research into the application of management practices uniquely suited to motivating knowledge workers to superior performance.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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