Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2019

Guellil Imane, Darwish Kareem and Azouaou Faical

This paper aims to propose an approach to automatically annotate a large corpus in Arabic dialect. This corpus is used in order to analyse sentiments of Arabic users on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose an approach to automatically annotate a large corpus in Arabic dialect. This corpus is used in order to analyse sentiments of Arabic users on social medias. It focuses on the Algerian dialect, which is a sub-dialect of Maghrebi Arabic. Although Algerian is spoken by roughly 40 million speakers, few studies address the automated processing in general and the sentiment analysis in specific for Algerian.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is based on the construction and use of a sentiment lexicon to automatically annotate a large corpus of Algerian text that is extracted from Facebook. Using this approach allow to significantly increase the size of the training corpus without calling the manual annotation. The annotated corpus is then vectorized using document embedding (doc2vec), which is an extension of word embeddings (word2vec). For sentiments classification, the authors used different classifiers such as support vector machines (SVM), Naive Bayes (NB) and logistic regression (LR).

Findings

The results suggest that NB and SVM classifiers generally led to the best results and MLP generally had the worst results. Further, the threshold that the authors use in selecting messages for the training set had a noticeable impact on recall and precision, with a threshold of 0.6 producing the best results. Using PV-DBOW led to slightly higher results than using PV-DM. Combining PV-DBOW and PV-DM representations led to slightly lower results than using PV-DBOW alone. The best results were obtained by the NB classifier with F1 up to 86.9 per cent.

Originality/value

The principal originality of this paper is to determine the right parameters for automatically annotating an Algerian dialect corpus. This annotation is based on a sentiment lexicon that was also constructed automatically.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Fahad Ali Hakami

This study aims to identify and measure the lexical gap between the old and young generations in the Jizani dialect and determine the causes of that gap.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and measure the lexical gap between the old and young generations in the Jizani dialect and determine the causes of that gap.

Design/methodology/approach

A 20-item questionnaire was distributed randomly among 104 participants. Next, 12 participants were selected and interviewed. SPSS software was used to analyse the quantitative data from the questionnaire. The data elicited from the interviews was qualitatively analysed, considering age and gender factors.

Findings

The major findings revealed that a lexical gap between old and young language speakers in the Jizani dialect exists. The gap between young females and the older generation was greater than that between young and old males. Some old words are likely to disappear in the coming decades. Social media, which is a time-consuming and word-borrowing medium for young people, was one of the reasons, besides the tendency of females to use prestigious words.

Originality/value

This study attempted to find the differences between the vocabularies of old and young speakers. If it does exist, is it significant? What are the reasons for this lexical gap? This will help other researchers and dialectologists register the old words before they die out and try to bridge that lexical gap.

Details

Saudi Journal of Language Studies, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Mark C. Goniwiecha and David A. Hales

Americans have become increasingly interested in their ethnic heritage in recent years. Assimilated Euro‐Americans, whose ancestors arrived in the New World generations…

Abstract

Americans have become increasingly interested in their ethnic heritage in recent years. Assimilated Euro‐Americans, whose ancestors arrived in the New World generations ago, are rediscovering their roots and are enrolling in foreign language classes, taking up folk dancing, learning ethnic cuisine, tracing their genealogical pedigrees, and returning to the religious traditions their parents may or may not have passed on to them. Now it's “in” to be ethnic.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Suzanne C. Hopf, Sharynne McLeod and Sarah H. McDonagh

Fiji is a multicultural and linguistically multi-competent country. Historical ethnic divisions have socialised students into language friendships based around common…

Abstract

Purpose

Fiji is a multicultural and linguistically multi-competent country. Historical ethnic divisions have socialised students into language friendships based around common languages. Recent changes to educational policy, specifically the mandating of students learning all three of the Standard languages of Fiji (Fijian, Hindi, and English), have been introduced in hope that cross-linguistic understanding will encourage a greater sense of national identity amongst all Fijians regardless of ethnicity. This study explores one multilingual school environment considering students’ language use, attitudes and friendships in light of these policies.

Methodology/approach

A convergent mixed-methods research design using surveying, artefact collection, students’ drawing and observation was employed.

Findings

The majority of students reported some proficiency in the language of their inter-ethnic peers; however, students’ inter-ethnic friendships predominantly relied on English language use. It was observed that most friendships amongst these Fijian primary school students were still established according to main language use at home; however, inter-ethnic peer interaction in English was observed to be friendly and respectful. These language use patterns and friendship behaviours were potentially reinforced by individual and societal multilingualism, in addition to the school environment.

Originality/value

The chapter presents the first research linking Fijian primary school students’ language choices and friendship development.

Details

Friendship and Peer Culture in Multilingual Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-396-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Nayia Roussou

Cyprus, a small island state in the far eastern corner of the Mediterranean, is an appropriate example of modernising states faced with the influx of Media pluralism and…

Abstract

Cyprus, a small island state in the far eastern corner of the Mediterranean, is an appropriate example of modernising states faced with the influx of Media pluralism and all the boons of a rich age of information communication systems, while its indigenous political problems remain unsolved. The invasion of Cyprus by Turkish troops in 1974 and the dichotomy of the land, with Turkish-Cypriots occupying and living in the Northern part and Greek-Cypriots living in the southern part of the island, has created a state in transition, from nationalism to internationalism, from the stage of ethnic cleavage to the stage of modernisation and globalisation. Media pluralism with the proliferation of imported programmes is another dimension in the life of the island. The ethnic/national issues, together with the content of television programmes, were the subject of the present study among youth. The discourses in these issues are presented through the three stages of the research conducted: the statistical research survey, the discourse analysis of 5 out of the top 10 programmes popular among the sample and the 23 interviews and 2 group discussions conducted with members of the sample. The results establish a relationship between television and national/ethnic issues and opens areas of research on television/media discourses about human rights, identity and nationality in an age of globalisation. The world may be sharing images, but individual countries are called upon to face internal national and political realities.

Details

Human Rights and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-052-5

Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2020

Peter Pichler

This chapter focusses on current debates on ‘locating metal’ and on the demand for more theoretical and methodological rigor in metal studies. As an example of the usage…

Abstract

This chapter focusses on current debates on ‘locating metal’ and on the demand for more theoretical and methodological rigor in metal studies. As an example of the usage of a non-English language in metal, the author examines the empirical case of the usage of Austrian German and Austrian dialects in metal music since around 1990. Herein, the author will be using the disciplinary methodologies of history and analyse the two Austrian bands Alkbottle and Varulv. According to the theory of ‘sonic knowledge’, the case study is interpreted as an example of ‘locating metal’ that occurred in the Austrian metal scene. The chapter shows that the seemingly contradictory coexistence of both deconstructive irony and essentialist nationalism is characteristic of the usage of Austrian German in metal. To conclude, the author proposes that this paradox is a result of the broad cultural history of Austrian nation building after 1945. The paradox of the usage of Austrian dialects in metal is the metal scene's attempt at coping with the frictions of Austria's twentieth century history.

Details

Multilingual Metal Music: Sociocultural, Linguistic and Literary Perspectives on Heavy Metal Lyrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-948-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Christopher J. Feider

It is often helpful to describe something by first stating what it is not. Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) is not a dictionary of Americanisms, nor is it a…

Abstract

It is often helpful to describe something by first stating what it is not. Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) is not a dictionary of Americanisms, nor is it a dictionary of slang; DARE differs from those reference tools in features and purpose.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Ginger G. Collins and Amy M. Glaspey

Dynamic assessment in the educational setting has been shown to offer many benefits for students with speech and language disorders. This chapter highlights the benefits…

Abstract

Dynamic assessment in the educational setting has been shown to offer many benefits for students with speech and language disorders. This chapter highlights the benefits of dynamic assessment and describes the limitations of static assessments. Because dynamic assessment can be implemented in many ways, three scenarios have been designed to provide an overview of some of these variations. Scenario 1 includes a graduated prompt approach for assessing abilities in the production of speech sounds using a standardized dynamic assessment. Scenario 2 includes a graduated prompt approach for assessing the linguistic skills underlying spelling errors. Scenario 3 includes a test-teach-retest approach for determining the presence of language impairment in students who speak a nonmainstream dialect of English. Suggestions for goal setting and increasing dynamic assessment applications for students with speech and language disorders are presented.

Details

Traditional and Innovative Assessment Techniques for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-890-1

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Siham Mousa Alhaider

This article studies the particle qad in standard Arabic (SA) and Asiri Arabic (AA). In SA, qad is pronounced as [qæd], whereas in AA it is pronounced as [q?d] and written…

Abstract

Purpose

This article studies the particle qad in standard Arabic (SA) and Asiri Arabic (AA). In SA, qad is pronounced as [qæd], whereas in AA it is pronounced as [q?d] and written as qid. Qad in SA is different from qid in AA regarding its functional use and syntactic distribution. Accordingly, the study discusses the semantics and selection properties of qad/qid.

Design/methodology/approach

Contrasting analyses are presented to verify which syntactic analysis better suits extended projection principle (EPP) extension, and tree structures are provided to elucidate ongoing problematic configurations and to provide solutions.

Findings

The SA particle qad has three functions: (1) a probability modal, as in may or might; (2) a perfective auxiliary, as in have, has and had; and (3) indicating emphatic purpose, as in do, does and did. Contrariwise, qid in AA has two meanings: (1) have, has and had (perfective auxiliary); and (2) the past tense of the English copula was/became (a linking verb). Given this background, there has been a debate in the syntax literature about whether qid/qad is an adverb. The current article provides evidence indicating that qid and qad are not adverbs.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to the analysis of qid in Asiri dialect. Further research needs to be done on the different branches of the Asiri dialects according to the tribe. Sometimes, tribes have different sound for some words. There is not any literature review found on the Asiri dialects in the designated area of study; the particle qid.

Practical implications

The study can be counted towards the Asiri linguistic heritage in documenting the syntactic and semantic properties of qid particle. The study contributes to the linguistic field of the Arabic language and its varieties.

Social implications

The study offers a general review of the linguistic background of Asir region. The study introduces the reader to qad particle in SA and holds a comparison between the two researched versions of qad in SA and qid in AA.

Originality/value

The paradoxical analysis between qad and qid on all levels is presented (semantics, functional use, selection properties and level of configuration (EPP)). Also, it introduces the particle qid in AA as it was never investigated before.

Details

Saudi Journal of Language Studies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2634-243X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2009

Ilan Alon, Romie F. Littrell and Allan K.K. Chan

This article reviews and discusses issues in the translation of international brand names to Chinese, and provides a framework for international brand managers who want to…

2038

Abstract

This article reviews and discusses issues in the translation of international brand names to Chinese, and provides a framework for international brand managers who want to expand into China. Linguistic differences between Chinese and English are wide and deep, making translation of brand names difficult. Cultural context, pronunciation, written vs. oral language, and the meaning of characters are just a few examples of such difficulties. We discuss four global product‐naming strategic alternatives available to country/brand managers, along with their usage. The four approaches include (1) dual extension, (2) brand meaning extension, (3) brand feeling extension, and (4) dual adaptation. We also provide examples of brands utilizing the different approaches.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

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