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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2018

Elok Zubaidah, Raida Amelia Ifadah, Umi Kalsum, Diana Lyrawati, Widya Dwi Rukmi Putri, Ignatius Srianta and Philippe J. Blanc

This paper aims to study the anti-diabetes activity of the Kombucha prepared from different snake fruit cultivars.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the anti-diabetes activity of the Kombucha prepared from different snake fruit cultivars.

Design/methodology/approach

The juices of snake fruits of Suwaru, Madura, Pondoh and Bali cultivars were fermented for 14 days. Anti-diabetes activity of the products was analyzed. Twenty-four male albino Wistar rats were used and randomly divided into six experimental groups, i.e. four groups of the diabetic rats treated with the Kombucha, plus the normal group and diabetic control group. The Kombucha were orally administered to the streptozotocin induced-diabetic rats at 5 mL/kg body weight per day during the 28-day experiment. The fasting plasma glucose (FPG), oxidative stress indices (superoxide dismutase [SOD] activity and Malondialdehyde [MDA] level) and lipid profile of the blood plasma were measured. The pancreas was used for immunohistochemical study and β-cells quantification. Data were analysed by ANOVA followed by Fisher test using Minitab version 16.0.

Findings

FPG of the diabetic rats treated with the Kombucha (110.3-189.3 mg/dL) was significantly lower (p = 0.000) than the diabetic control group (413.3 mg/dL). Those were in line with the number of pancreatic β-cells of 42.1 in diabetic rats that lower (p = 006) than those in treated the diabetic rats (61.2-73.5). The treated diabetic rats had lower oxidative stress (SOD activity: 20.9-44.6 unit/100 µL with p = 0.000; MDA level: 0.37-0.48 ng/100 µL with p = 0.000) than those in the diabetic rats (SOD activity: 18.7 unit/100µL; MDA level: 0.84 ng/100 µL). The treated diabetic rats also showed better lipid profile than those in the diabetic control rats. There were cultivar differences, and the Suwaru and Madura snake fruit Kombucha demonstrated the most potential for diabetes management.

Originality/value

This is the first study on in vivo anti-diabetes activity of snake fruit Kombucha prepared from different snake fruit cultivars.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Eunice Ngozi Ezembu, Chioke Amaefuna Okolo, James Obiegbuna and Florence Chika Ikeogu

The purpose of this study is to examine the acute toxicity and antidiabetic activity of Asystacia gangetica leaf ethanol extract.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the acute toxicity and antidiabetic activity of Asystacia gangetica leaf ethanol extract.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was designed as completely randomized in vivo experimental model. Where acute toxicity study was carried out using 30 albino mice, randomly assigned into six groups of five mice each. Toxicity signs and mortality were observed in the rats within a period of 24 h. The acute and sub-acute antidiabetic study was carried out using 50 rats, randomly assigned into five groups of 10 rats each. The rats’ blood glucose levels were determined and used to assess the acute and sub-acute antidiabetic activity of the extract.

Findings

Results obtained from the acute toxicity study indicated no death in any of the study groups, even at 5,000 mg/kg body weight and showed no signs of toxicity. The acute antidiabetic study showed that treatment with 400 mg/kg of the extract significantly (p = 0.01) lowered glucose level in the diabetic rats from 430.6 to 177.4 mg/dl while 800 mg/kg brought down glucose level from 370 to 144.2 mg/dl by the end of 6 h following administration when compared with the diabetic control group. It was observed that the effect of the extract mostly at 800 mg/kg also compared favorably with that of the standard drug (glibenclamide), which lowered glucose level in diabetic rats from 374.2 to 176.4 mg/dl. Furthermore, the significant reduction was evident from 4, 2 and 2 h for 400 mg/kg extract, 800 mg/kg extract and 5 mg/kg glibenclamide, respectively. At sub-acute level the blood glucose was lowered from 155.6 to 127.2 mg/dl, 137 to 124.4 mg/dl and 151.8 to 121.8 mg/dl for diabetic rats treated with 400 mg/kg, 800 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg glibenclamide, respectively, when compared to the diabetic untreated rats, which ranged from 417.6 to 358.6 mg/dl. The biochemical profile, lipid profile and hematological examination were all positively restored near to normal with the herbal treatment at the different doses. At histopathology level, the liver of the rats treated with 400 mg/kg had moderate portal inflammation without interface or lobular hepatitis while that of 800 mg/kg showed severe portal inflammation with the interface and lobular hepatitis with extensive confluents necrosis. The pancreatic cells of the treated rat showed no significant difference in the β-cells of the islets of Langerhans with hyperplasia of the acinar cell when compared to the diabetic untreated.

Research limitations/implications

The record of no death and signs of toxicity implies that the extract is safe for consumption even at a high dosage of 5,000 mg/kg body weight. The significant (p = 0.01) reduction in the plasma glucose level of the treated rats as compared to the control is an indication of blood glucose-lowering potential of the extract at two different doses. The significant reduction evident of the extract at different hours and days for the two doses implies that the extract rate of lowering potentials is dose-dependent. The evidence of moderate-severe portal inflammation with the interface and lobular hepatitis at 800 mg/kg treatment is an indication that the intake of this herb at high dosage for long period is not safe for the liver tissue.

Practical implications

The outcome of this study suggested that the Asystacia gangetica should also be used as a vegetable in-home food preparation and food processing to use its antidiabetic effect. The herbal extract could also be incorporated into a food product and processed into herbal tea bag for convenient. The subjection of this herbal plant to heat treatment during processing could be a possible avenue to make it safe.

Social implications

The economic burden and complications of diabetes mellitus management will be reduced if the practical implication of this research finding is implemented in foods as vegetable and in functional food production.

Originality/value

This study revealed that Asystacia gangetica leaf extract may be safe and effective for use at a low dose for acute management of diabetes mellitus. This research may be of value to those living with diabetes mellitus.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Narasimhanaidu Kamalakkannan and Khalid S. Alnumair

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of rutin, a polyphenolic flavonoid on the fatty acid composition in liver and kidney of streptozotocin (STZ)‐induced diabetic rats.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of rutin, a polyphenolic flavonoid on the fatty acid composition in liver and kidney of streptozotocin (STZ)‐induced diabetic rats.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive literature review was carried out and no reports on the effect of rutin on the fatty acid composition in diabetic tissues were found.

Findings

Streptozotocin‐induced diabetic rats showed altered lipid concentration in liver and kidney. The fatty acid composition was also altered in these tissues. Treatment with rutin to diabetic rats significantly decreased the concentration of palmitic acid, stearic acid and oleic acid, whereas linolenic and arachidonic acids were significantly increased in liver and kidney of diabetic rats. Rutin administration to normal rats did not show any significant effect on the fatty acid composition in liver and kidney.

Originality/value

This paper gives an idea of the changes in the fatty acid composition of diabetic tissues and during treatment with rutin.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Tri Dewanti Widyaningsih, Astri Iga Siska, Roudlatul Fanani and Erryana Martati

This study aims to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of traditional drink of black cincau-based wedang uwuh (WUB) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of traditional drink of black cincau-based wedang uwuh (WUB) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

Design/methodology/approach

WUB consists of dried herbs such as black cincau leaves (Mesona palustris BL), red ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc), cloves (Syzgium aromaticum), sappan wood (Caesalpinia sappan Lin) and soursop leaves (Annona muricata). In this study, the rats were divided into five groups: normal control, diabetic control and three groups of WUB (WUB 13.5 mL/kg and WUB 27 mL/kg) or wedang uwuh commercial (WUC) treated diabetic groups. WUB or WUC was administered by gavage for three days after rats were confirmed diabetic induced by alloxan; these injections were continued for 28 days. At the end of the experiment, the spleen of rats was analyzed using flow cytometry. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by Tukey test using Minitab version 16.0.

Findings

This study showed that WUB significantly inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interferon-Y [IFN-ɣ] and tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-a]) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 10 [IL-10] and transforming growth factor-β [TGF-ß]), and achieved a balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines that were not significantly different from normal controls. WUB 27 was able to regulate the production of relative average cytokines IFN-ɣ (7.6 ± 3.5; p = 0.010), TNF-a (8.7 ± 2.4; p = 0.018), IL-10 (6.3 ± 2.4; p = 0.001) and TGF-ß (7.4 ± 2.1; p = 0.004) that was significantly different from diabetic control. This study’s results validate that the use of WUB can result in immunomodulatory activity in diabetic rats.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the immunomodulatory effect of WUB which is developed based on WUC; WUB has been used by Indonesian people as a functional beverage which acts as an immune booster and body warmer.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2018

HadjMostefa Khelladi, Djamil Krouf and Nawal Taleb-Dida

This paper aims to study the effect of green lemon zest combined with sardine proteins in diabetic hypertensive rats (DHRs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the effect of green lemon zest combined with sardine proteins in diabetic hypertensive rats (DHRs).

Design/methodology/approach

Male Wistar rats (n = 30) weighing 250 ± 10 g were divided into five groups. The first group consumed a diet containing 20 per cent casein (C). The other four groups are rendered diabetic by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (40 mg/kg body weight), then hypertensive by subcutaneous implantation controlled time-release pellet containing ouabain (0.25 mg/pellet). One untreated group (DHR) consumed 20 per cent casein and the three other groups consumed the same diet supplemented with 2 per cent green lemon zest (DHR-lz), or with 20 per cent of sardine protein (group DHR-sp) or with the combination of both sardine proteins and green lemon zest (group DHR-sp + lz).

Findings

DHRs feeding on the combination of both sardine protein (sp) and lemon zest (lz) induced a significant decrease of diastolic blood pressure and heart rates values compared with DHR (p < 0.05). The HDLC values were increased by +55 per cent in DHR-sp + lz compared with DHR group. Moreover, plasma non-HDLC concentrations were decreased significantly compared to DHR, DHR-lz, DHR-sp and C groups. In DHR-sp + lzvs DHR group, TBARS values were decreased by −25 per cent in the liver. Moreover, kidney TBARS were significantly reduced by −66, −51, −65 and −67 per cent compared with C, DHR, DHR-lz and DHR-sp, respectively.

Originality/value

These results suggest that consumption of green lemon zest combined with sardine proteins can reduce blood pressure and tissue oxidative damage and, therefore, help to prevent cardiovascular complications in hypertensive diabetic patients.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Ishawu Iddrisu, Ibok Oduro, Marina Aferiba Tandoh and Reginald Adjetey Annan

The purpose of this paper was to synthesis all primary evidence relevant to the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion. Dandelion leaf and root have been used extensively for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to synthesis all primary evidence relevant to the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion. Dandelion leaf and root have been used extensively for its medicinal and health benefits since hundreds of years ago. This systematic review was conducted to gather scientific evidence that are available with regards to the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion leaf and root.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search was conducted using PubMed, BioMed, PLUSONE and Cochrane databases between June 6, 2013 and June 30, 2013. Manual search was also done on books and journals in the KNUST library and its electronic database for possible documented effects of dandelion leaf or root on diabetic patients. Key words “dandelion”, “Taraxacum”, “dandelion and diabetes”, “Taraxacum officinale”, “Taraxacum and diabetes”, “dandelion and hypoglycemia” and “dandelion and hyperglycemia” were used in the search.

Findings

The search yielded 713 papers, and after the removal of duplicates and papers not relevant to this review, 20 papers were accepted for the review. These included studies conducted in humans and animals (rats and mice). Among the 20 studies reviewed, only 1 study examined and reported a positive hypoglycemic effect of dandelion on diabetic rats.

Research limitations/implications

The review only considered published papers and might have left out some unpublished research works.

Practical implications

The results of this review suggest paucity of data available on the use of dandelion in the treatment/management of diabetes. There is the need for well-designed clinical trials to ascertain the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion.

Social implications

The consumption of dandelion by type 2 diabetic patients to treat or manage their blood glucose has not been clinically proven to be effective, as shown by the review.

Originality/value

The paper provides a clear picture of the evidence available in the use of dandelion as an anti-diabetic herb, and this provides some preliminary data for the conduct of a clinical research on it.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Hayet Cherrad, Sherazede Bouderbala, Yahiaoui Zidan and Djamil Krouf

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of olive cake (CO) on glycaemia and lipemia and lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activities in erythrocytes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of olive cake (CO) on glycaemia and lipemia and lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activities in erythrocytes and tissues, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

Design/methodology/approach

Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (55 mg/kg BW). In total, 12 diabetic D rats, weighing 260 ± 20 g, were divided into two groups fed a casein diet supplemented (D-OC) or not (D) with OC (7.5 per cent), for four weeks.

Findings

In D-OC compared with D, glycaemia, total cholesterol and triglycerides values (−40 per cent; p = 0.007, 27 per cent; p = 0.007 and −27 per cent; p = 0.0019). In erythrocyte, liver, kidney, heart, muscle and brain, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances contents were respectively, (−19 per cent; p = 0.03, −32 per cent; p = 0.002, −20 per cent; p = 0.04, −68 per cent; p = 0.003, −74 per cent; p = 0.0003 and −38 per cent; p = 0.04). In erythrocyte, SOD, GSH-Px and CAT activities were respectively, (+14 per cent; p = 0.01, +74 per cent; p = 0.012 and +34 per cent; p = 0.0009). In the liver, kidney, heart and muscle, SOD activity was respectively, (+31 per cent; p = 0.004, +12 per cent; p = 0.038, +43 per cent; p = 0.001 and +23 per cent; p = 0.18). GSH-Px activity was respectively, (+121 per cent; p = 0.0009, 89 per cent; p = 0.0006, + 95 per cent; p = 0.008, +71 per cent; p = 0.02 and +26 per cent; p = 0.01), in the liver, kidney, heart, muscle and brain. Catalase activity was (+21 per cent; p = 0.008) in the liver, (+88 per cent; p = 0.0002 in the kidney, +53 per cent; p = 0,002 in the heart and 83 per cent; p = 0.00004 in the muscle).

Originality/value

In diabetic rats, OC reduces hyperglycaemia induced by STZ and attenuates triglyceridemia and cholesterolemia. This residue is able to decrease the oxidative stress by increasing the antioxidant enzymes activity in erythrocytes and tissues. The high contents of phytoconstituents present in OC are considered to be responsible for this effect.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2019

Yahiaoui Zidan, Sherazede Bouderbala, Cherrad Hayet and Bouchenak Malika

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of olive cake (OC) on lipid peroxidation as well as antioxidant enzymes activities of serum, red blood cells (RBCs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of olive cake (OC) on lipid peroxidation as well as antioxidant enzymes activities of serum, red blood cells (RBCs) and liver, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced-diabetic rat fed cholesterol-enriched diet.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypercholesterolemic male rats were rendered diabetic (HC-D) by a single intraperitoneal injection dose of STZ (35 mg/kg BW). HC-D rats were divided into two groups fed for 28d a diet supplemented with OC at 7.5 percent (HC-D-OC) or not (HC-D). A control group (C) was submitted to standard diet containing 20 per cent casein for the same experimental period.

Findings

RBCs, serum and liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) contents were significantly increased in HC-D, compared to C group (p = 0.04, p = 0.02 and 0.03). These values were significantly decreased (48 per cent and 64 per cent; p = 0.02 and p = 0.0007) in serum and liver of HC-D-OC vs HC-D group. In RBCs, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were, respectively, 1.5, 2- and 1.7-fold higher (p = 0.03, p = 0.008 and p = 0.03) in HC-D group compared to HC group. In serum and liver, SOD, CAT and GST activities were, respectively, 1.3-, 2.6- and 1.6-fold increased (p = 0.03, p = 0.007 and p = 0.02). In HC-D-OC compared to HC-D group, RBCs glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), CAT and GST activities were, respectively, 2.1-, 3.3- and 2.1-fold higher (p = 0.04, p = 0.0009 and p = 0.03). In serum, SOD and CAT activities were, respectively, 1.5- and 1.9-fold increased (p = 0.02, p = 0.02). In liver, SOD, GSH-PX, CAT and GST activities were significantly increased (p = 0.005, p = 0.03, p = 0.02 and p = 0.04).

Originality/value

In diabetic rats-fed cholesterol-enriched diet, OC was able to reduce oxidative stress by decreasing lipid peroxidation and increasing antioxidant enzymes activities in serum, RBCs and liver.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Reny Marlina, Binar Panunggal and Gemala Anjani

Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus increases inflammation through pancreatic beta-cell destruction. Goat milk (kefir) and vitamin D3 have antioxidant and…

Abstract

Purpose

Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus increases inflammation through pancreatic beta-cell destruction. Goat milk (kefir) and vitamin D3 have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can reduce pancreatic beta cells. Increase in total leukocyte count is one of the inflammatory and complication markers of diabetes. This study aims to analyze the effect of fermented goat milk (kefir) fortified with vitamin D3 on total leukocyte counts in diabetic brown rat (Rattus norvegicus).

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design with pre- and post-test methodology of control and experimental groups was used. A total of 24 male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: negative control (K−), positive control (K+), kefir treatment (P1) and kefir fortified with vitamin D3 treatment (P2). The control group consisted of healthy rats; the other groups consisted of rats which were given streptozotocin–nicotinamide injections. Before and after intervention, fasting blood glucose levels and total leukocytes counts were measured. Blood glucose levels were analyzed using the GOD–PAP method and leukocyte counts were analyzed using an automatic hematological analyzer.

Findings

There was a significant decrease in total leukocyte counts in the P2 group (from 26.5 ± 7.7 to 20.4 ± 10.4 [p < 0.05]). However, the decrease in leukocyte count in theP1 group was not significant (from 22.1 ± 9.3 to 16.5 ± 6.2). The decrease in blood glucose levels in theP2 group was −81.4 ± 203.0 but not significant.

Originality/value

Kefir with vitamin D3 fortification can significantly reduce total leukocyte counts in diabetes.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Arash Karimi, Hamid Reza Niazkar, Pouria Sefidmooye Azar, Helda Tutunchi, Mozhde Karimi, Vahid Asghariazar and Fateme Kooshki

Herbal medicine has been used for the management of complications of diabetes. The purpose of this paper is to examine the anti-diabetic effects of Achillea millefolium

Abstract

Purpose

Herbal medicine has been used for the management of complications of diabetes. The purpose of this paper is to examine the anti-diabetic effects of Achillea millefolium extract on diabetic rats.

Design/methodology/approach

To this aim, 32 male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into four groups in which each group comprised eight rats. The four experimental groups were as follows: control group, diabetic control (DC) group (STZ; 50 mg/kg), diabetic rats, receiving 250 mg/kg hydro-alcoholic extract of the A. millefolium (DAM) and diabetic rats, receiving 5 mg/kg glibenclamide (DG). After 21 days of the treatment course, tissues of the kidney and blood samples were collected for histopathological, biochemical and molecular analysis.

Findings

The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glucose serum were markedly reduced in the DC group while significantly increased in DG and DAM groups (1.11 ± 0.57 to 19.4 ± 3.5 and 17.8 ± 1.2 p =0.002 and 325 ± 0.18 to 223 ± 0.11 and 211 ± 0.32 p =0.02, respectively). Also, the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were markedly reduced in the DC group while significantly increased in DAM and DG groups (9.1 ± 2.21 to 18.7 ± 3.81 and 14.9 ± 3.1 p = 0.03 and p =0.02, respectively). The concentrations of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and urea were substantially decreased in DAM and DG groups as compared with the DC group (0.49 ± 0.02 to 0.27 ± 0.01 and 0.25 ± 0.01 p =0.01, 15.6 ± 2.1 to 7.2 ± 0.68 and 8.6 ± 1.2 p =0.02 and 114 ± 9.4 to 59.8 ± 5.2 and 64 ± 5.2 p =0.03, respectively). Also, Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) expression was significantly decreased in DAM and DG groups as compared with the DC group (1.3 ± 0.32 to 0.91 ± 0.03 and 0.93 ± 0.02 p = <0.01) and Bcl-2 expression were significantly increased in DAM and DG groups as compared with the DC group (0.42 ± 0.05 to 0.88 ± 0.07 and 0.85 ± 0.06 p =0.01).

Originality/value

Diabetes led to degenerative damages in the kidney of rats and increased the mRNA level of Bax, while treatment with A. millefolium could protect the kidney tissue against diabetes complications and increased the mRNA expression of Bcl-2. This study indicated that A. millefolium extracts not only improves renal function as a result of anti-oxidant activity but also modulates some biochemical factors in diabetic rats.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of 218