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1 – 10 of 110
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Ebony O. McGee, Devin T. White, Akailah T. Jenkins, Stacey Houston, Lydia C. Bentley, William J. Smith and William H. Robinson

Much of the extant research, practice and policy in engineering education has focused on the limited persistence, waning interest and lack of preparation among Black…

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Abstract

Purpose

Much of the extant research, practice and policy in engineering education has focused on the limited persistence, waning interest and lack of preparation among Black students to continue beyond the post-secondary engineering pipeline. However, this research suggests that many Black PhD students persist and succeed in engineering, fueled by various motivational strengths. To better understand the motivations of Black students in engineering doctoral programs, this study aims to explore the factors that influence their decision to enroll in either an engineering or a computing doctoral program.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses an intrinsic and extrinsic motivational framework to investigate the inspiration of 44 Black engineering doctoral students in PhD engineering programs in 11 engineering schools across the country.

Findings

Results show that the participants’ motivation to pursue a PhD in engineering comes from several distinct factors, including the following: an unyielding passion for their particular discipline, a sense of responsibility to serve marginalized peoples and society, a path toward autonomy, pre-PhD mentorship and research opportunities and family and prior work experience.

Research limitations/implications

Based on this study’s findings, a reconceptualization of graduate engineering education that incorporates the importance of “being Black” and its relationships with motivating and, potentially, retaining Black science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) students is also offered.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to expose particular constructs and behaviors surrounding Black students’ motivation to learn and achieve in engineering at the highest academic levels, offering a more nuanced perspective than currently is found in traditional engineering education literature.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Amy P. Lippa, Linda C. Lee, Meghan D. Lehr, Daniel D. Spikes, Leslie A. Coward, Bradley W. Davis, Mark A. Gooden and Dorothy R. Hall

As a team of eight scholars at the University of Texas, we collaborate to research issues that directly focus on the development, training, and experiences of anti-racist…

Abstract

As a team of eight scholars at the University of Texas, we collaborate to research issues that directly focus on the development, training, and experiences of anti-racist and social justice leaders in urban secondary schools. Each of us considered a personal event, or series of events, that significantly influenced our thinking about social justice. We share experiences of personal and institutional racism, and reflect on how these experiences continue to shape our awareness of race. Our perspectives capture how issues of race and racial discrimination persist in a status quo educational system and how past experiences directly influence our work.

Details

Living the Work: Promoting Social Justice and Equity Work in Schools around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-127-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2021

Silvia Siu-Yin Clement-Lam, Airey Nga-Lui Lau and Devin M. Kearns

Neuroimaging research has substantially enhanced our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms of typical and atypical learning in children. These developments can…

Abstract

Neuroimaging research has substantially enhanced our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms of typical and atypical learning in children. These developments can advance the design of novel approaches to diagnosis and intervention for learning disabilities. Despite the promise of educational neuroscience, there are still walls between neuroscience and special education researchers such that more collaboration and understanding are needed between these disciplines. This chapter attempts to break down the walls by discussing how neuroimaging techniques can be incorporated into special education research. We also present arguments as to why neuroscience is “the next big thing” in special education research and the obstacles that must be overcome in order for neuroscience to be incorporated into education research. To describe how neurobiology might impact special education, we focus primarily on reading disability. We believe that educational neuroscience can aid in the identification and intervention of other learning disorders as well.

Details

The Next Big Thing in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-749-7

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2016

Joy Lawson Davis

This chapter focuses on dispelling popularized educational myths by providing “lively personal accounts” of the experiences of culturally and racially diverse families who…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on dispelling popularized educational myths by providing “lively personal accounts” of the experiences of culturally and racially diverse families who are raising high ability/gifted children and youth or who have completed the task with outstanding proficiency and remarkable skill. Through vignettes, parents reveal how they experienced their children’s giftedness in the context of the home and community. In a concluding lessons learned section, an analysis of themes generated is shared based on input from the families. Recommendations for further research and considerations for school practice are also provided.

Details

Gifted Children of Color Around the World: Diverse Needs, Exemplary Practices, and Directions for the Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-119-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Lyndie Bayne, Sharon Purchase and Ann Tarca

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the use of power in a business network context is investigated, in relation to companies’ environmental reporting and practice…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, the use of power in a business network context is investigated, in relation to companies’ environmental reporting and practice choices. Second, the environmental reporting-practice portrayal gap is examined, focussing on inter-organisational environmental practices (such as green supply chain management).

Design/methodology/approach

A network case study was undertaken in the Western Australian agrifood sector, with the two large, dominant supermarkets as focal actors. Data were drawn from 34 in-depth interviews from 2011 to 2013 and a document review including 15 years of supermarket reports.

Findings

The study showed the exercise of government power bases and its effect on supermarket and other supply chain actors’ reporting and practice choices. The data suggest a differential use of power by supermarkets with suppliers, depending on supplier type and environmental practice characteristics. The study revealed surprisingly transparent reporting of the lack of whole-of-supply-chain approach by the supermarkets and admission of shareholder power over reporting and practice choices. In addition, other reporting-practice portrayal gaps relating to inter-organisational environmental practices were found.

Originality/value

The study provides a unique network level analysis of how power relations interact and influence companies’ choices of environmental reporting and practice, thereby contributing to prior power and environmental reporting literature. Contributions are made to extant literature dealing with the reporting-practice portrayal gap by focussing on inter-organisational environmental reporting and practice.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Chris O'Riordan and Aoife McDermott

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and value of the clinical management role undertaken by primary care doctors in Ireland. To date, a majority of research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and value of the clinical management role undertaken by primary care doctors in Ireland. To date, a majority of research has focused on clinical management roles in the acute sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a sub‐set of data from a mixed methods study. In total, 14 semi‐structured interviews are drawn upon to identify the nature and value of the clinical management role in primary care.

Findings

Comparison with acute sector research identifies considerable differences in the nature of the clinical management role across sectors – and in the associated value proposition. Structural and role‐related contingencies affecting the potential value of clinical management roles in Irish primary care are discussed. Structural influences include the private ownership structure, low complexity and limited requirement for cross‐professional coordination. Role‐related influences include the primacy of the clinical identity, time constraints and lack of managerial training.

Research limitations/implications

The findings provide a limited basis for generalisation, premised on 14 interviews in one national context. However, given the international shift towards the provision of health services in primary care, they provide a research agenda for an important healthcare context.

Practical implications

The findings draw attention to the need for policy consideration of the value of the clinical manager role in primary care; how policy can support effective primary care management; and the need for specialised management training, which takes account of the small‐firm context.

Originality/value

The paper identifies that primary‐care clinical‐management roles focus on operational management and oversight and discusses the structural and role‐related factors which affect their efficacy.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

David Devins, Steve Johnson and John Sutherland

Workforce development is becoming a higher priority for government, both as a means of addressing social exclusion and raising competitiveness. However there is limited…

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Abstract

Workforce development is becoming a higher priority for government, both as a means of addressing social exclusion and raising competitiveness. However there is limited evidence of the contribution of training to the success of individual firms and even less evidence of the impact of such training activity on small to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) employees. This paper draws on a survey of 1,000 employees to investigate the impact of a training intervention on employees in SME workplaces. It explores issues associated with the equity of provision of training in the workplace and the impact of training on the employability of SME employees in the labour market. The results suggest that training interventions lead to positive outcomes for the majority of SME employees, particularly those working in organisations with relatively formalised training practices. It concludes by suggesting that there should be a greater focus on the employee dimension in research and policy regarding training in SMEs.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2007

Nancy J. Adler

Given the dramatic changes taking place in society, the economy, and technology, 21st-century organizations need to engage in new, more spontaneous, and more innovative…

Abstract

Given the dramatic changes taking place in society, the economy, and technology, 21st-century organizations need to engage in new, more spontaneous, and more innovative ways of managing. I investigate why an increasing number of companies are including artists and artistic processes in their approaches to strategic and day-to-day management and leadership.

Details

Designing Information and Organizations with a Positive Lens
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-398-3

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Metal saved my life. It is not the first time and it probably will not be the last. The death of my mother when I was twenty-one meant that I was alone, and if it had not…

Abstract

Metal saved my life. It is not the first time and it probably will not be the last. The death of my mother when I was twenty-one meant that I was alone, and if it had not been for metal, my grieving process may have been the end of my story. The death, of course, is one thing, but mourning is something that surfaces many years after the event. If I had not bought my first guitar the year she died, the last nineteen years of my life would follow a very different narrative.

I firmly believe that metal and metal performance prevented my suicide and any plans for revenge. It matched my pain, sonically, texturally, musically and aesthetically. It initiated a cathartic process that I have returned to since, because it offers me emotional and psychological balance that other music forms do not. This may be a purely subjective engagement, but that is precisely the point.

Remembering this time in my life is not easy, and can often come in hesitations, blanks and painful memories. By using interpretive performance autoethnography, a methodology that Laurel Richardson calls CAP or creative analytic practice (Richardson, 2000, p. 929) means:

[it] allows the researcher to take up a person’s life in its immediate particularity and to ground the life in its historical moment. We move back and forth in time, using a version of Sartre’s progressive-regressive method. Interpretation works forward to the conclusion of a set of acts taken up by the subject while working back in time, interrogating the historical, cultural, and biographical conditions that moved the person to experience the events being studied

Through this methodological application, this paper seeks to analyse how metal and metal performance helped me write my trauma into a performing life that ultimately liberated me from my grief.

Details

Music and Death: Interdisciplinary Readings and Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-945-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Donnalyn Pompper

The time is right for renewed and updated attention to the relationship between public relations (PR) and human resources (HR) departments in the context of corporate…

Abstract

The time is right for renewed and updated attention to the relationship between public relations (PR) and human resources (HR) departments in the context of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability. For too long, conflict between the two practice areas has obscured opportunities for collaboration which benefits organizations and stakeholders. This chapter offers theoretical underpinnings for examining an interdepartmental, cross-unit working relationship between HR and PR – and advances a vision for why it is needed now.

Details

Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, and Ethical Public Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-585-6

Keywords

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