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1 – 10 of over 3000
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Ida Gremyr and Mattias Elg

The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of a developmental learning view on implementation of quality management (QM) concepts. QM concepts are common in various…

1307

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of a developmental learning view on implementation of quality management (QM) concepts. QM concepts are common in various organizations; some implement them smoothly, others struggle and sometimes even abandon the initiatives. What is then a successful implementation – is it the use a specific QM method as a standard problem solving approach, or is it that learning has occurred during implementation?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an illustrative case study carried out at a hospital in western Sweden. The data have been collected through about 130 hours of participation in project work by the first author and through seven face-to-face interviews of about one hour each.

Findings

It is shown that a Design for Six Sigma pilot project with a narrow view on implementation could be regarded as a failure, but it gave rise to much learning and new improved ways of working. Hence, it is argued that a developmental view on implementation can support learning by an emergent and experimental approach to implementation processes.

Originality/value

Much research has been done on how to increase the success rate of implementations of QM initiatives, e.g. procedures to follow to reach an outcome where the new way of working is standard procedure. Less research has problematized the implementation process, questioning what a successful outcome of an implementation is.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 6 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

How to Deliver Integrated Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-530-1

Abstract

Details

Maturing Leadership: How Adult Development Impacts Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-402-7

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Carolyn Steele Gray and James Shaw

Models of integrated care are prime examples of complex interventions, incorporating multiple interacting components that work through varying mechanisms to impact…

1534

Abstract

Purpose

Models of integrated care are prime examples of complex interventions, incorporating multiple interacting components that work through varying mechanisms to impact numerous outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to explore summative, process and developmental approaches to evaluating complex interventions to determine how to best test this mess.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint draws on the evaluation and complex intervention literatures to describe the advantages and disadvantages of different methods. The evaluation of the electronic patient reported outcomes (ePRO) mobile application and portal system is presented as an example of how to evaluate complex interventions with critical lessons learned from this ongoing study.

Findings

Although favored in the literature, summative and process evaluations rest on two problematic assumptions: it is possible to clearly identify stable mechanisms of action; and intervention fidelity can be maximized in order to control for contextual influences. Complex interventions continually adapt to local contexts, making stability and fidelity unlikely. Developmental evaluation, which is more conceptually aligned with service-design thinking, moves beyond these assumptions, emphasizing supportive adaptation to ensure meaningful adoption.

Research limitations/implications

Blended approaches that incorporate service-design thinking and rely more heavily on developmental strategies are essential for complex interventions. To maximize the benefit of this approach, three guiding principles are suggested: stress pragmatism over stringency; adopt an implementation lens; and use multi-disciplinary teams to run studies.

Originality/value

This viewpoint offers novel thinking on the debate around appropriate evaluation methodologies to be applied to complex interventions like models of integrated care.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Per‐Erik Ellström

The purpose of this paper is to explore the idea of practice‐based innovation and to propose a framework that can be used to conceptualize and analyze practice‐based…

5317

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the idea of practice‐based innovation and to propose a framework that can be used to conceptualize and analyze practice‐based innovation processes in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The argument is driven by conceptual analysis and theoretical synthesis based on theory and research on innovation, organizational change, individual and organizational learning.

Findings

The proposed framework portrays practice‐based innovation as a cyclical process of adaptive and developmental learning driven by contradictions and tensions between explicit and implicit dimensions of work processes.

Originality/value

The paper adds to previous research through its focus on practice‐based innovation and the conceptualization of this notion in terms of learning in and through everyday work. It thus creates connections between innovation research and research on workplace learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 3 April 2020

Abstract

Details

Maturing Leadership: How Adult Development Impacts Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-402-7

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2022

Lance Richard Newey, Rui Torres de Oliveira and Archana Mishra

This paper aims to extend the conceptualization of well-being as a staged social responsibility process by undertaking further conceptual development of these ideas as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend the conceptualization of well-being as a staged social responsibility process by undertaking further conceptual development of these ideas as well as exploratory, small-scale international testing.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprised 117 leaders from Alaska, India and Norway. Cluster analysis was used to determine systematic differences in the way leaders think about societal well-being (well-being action logics), and regression analysis was used to test positive and significant relationships between well-being action logics and stages of consciousness.

Findings

Cluster analysis confirmed the three theoretically derived well-being action logics of top managers: compensatory, integral and hybrid. The authors found preliminary empirical support for a systematic relationship between well-being action logics and stages of consciousness as per constructive-developmental theory.

Practical implications

Better adoption of societal well-being as a normative ethic hinges on building the capacity of top managers to process more complex understandings of the range of components of societal well-being and how these components interact, conflict and synergize.

Social implications

Being asked to embrace more complex views about societal well-being can be overwhelming, leading top managers to retreat into defensiveness. The result is resistance to change, preferring instead to stay with familiar yet outmoded conceptions. Societal well-being can thus suffer.

Originality/value

This paper opens the black box to find systematic differences in the way managers think about societal well-being. Further, the research has uncovered that these differences follow a staged developmental process of greater complexity.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Beata Jałocha, Ewa Bogacz-Wojtanowska, Anna Góral, Piotr Jedynak and Grażyna Prawelska-Skrzypek

The aim of the study was to illustrate how three different institutional logics, present in the implementation of action research, interact in a formalised project, in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study was to illustrate how three different institutional logics, present in the implementation of action research, interact in a formalised project, in a traditional university setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is empirical in nature and the research method used is an instrumental case study. The case was the implementation of action research within the framework of an educational project co-financed by EU funds, conducted in a Polish public university. The research process was conducted from September 2017 to November 2019. The following techniques were used: document analysis, in-depth interviews, participatory observation during the project. Constant comparative analysis was used as an analytical approach.

Findings

The study indicates that action research, project management and university management follow different “logics”. The dominant logic of action research is problem-solving, of project management is efficiency and of university management is compliance. These different logics and the relationship between them is explained in the paper.

Originality/value

The research enriches the ongoing discussion on logic multiplicity and project management in a new context – that of the university environment and combines the issue of the implementation of action research with broader conversations on institutional logics.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2019

Sushanta Kumar Sarma

This paper aims to understand how competing logics can co-exist in the organizational field of Indian microfinance.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand how competing logics can co-exist in the organizational field of Indian microfinance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the theoretical lens of an organizational field to understand the composition of the microfinance field. Using the definition of an organizational field, key players in Indian microfinance are identified and their interactions within the field are analysed to understand the emergence and co-existence of multiple logics. The data used for this paper are collected from published work on Indian microfinance.

Findings

The co-existence of competing logics is sustained through the creation of two sub-fields within Indian microfinance. Each of the sub-field is dominated by one institutional logic. The field originated in developmental logic of microfinance and gradually adopted the banking logic post-2000. The sub-fields are dominated by different organizational forms with different nature of interaction within the field.

Research limitations/implications

Actors within the field would experience institutional complexity with lesser intensity because of the existence of two distinct sub-communities with individual logic. Dual logics can sustain itself independently provided these are embedded in two different sub-communities. Despite the emergence of a new logic, the previous logic can still remain relevant given the enabling support from institutional infrastructure.

Practical implications

The manifestation of development and banking logics through practices and the belief system in Indian microfinance would offer useful insights for social entrepreneurs balancing the dual goals of hybrid organizations. Due to the sub-communities, a professional working with different forms of organization would experience little pressure to adjust to diverse logic and would also experience no or little identity conflict.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the microfinance sector in India as an organizational field and explores the mechanism of co-existence of the dual goals of microfinance at the field level.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Nomie Eriksson

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze nurses’ perceptions and evaluations of healthcare developmental work after the introduction of Lean and Six Sigma and…

2247

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze nurses’ perceptions and evaluations of healthcare developmental work after the introduction of Lean and Six Sigma and, how nurses aspire to maintain a high reliability organization (HRO).

Design/methodology/approach

Nurses’ roles and the way they respond to new efficiency and quality working methods are crucial. Underlying themes were analyzed from in-depth, semi-structured interviews with (n=17) nurses at two Swedish hospitals.

Findings

The nurses perceived that Lean worked better than Six Sigma, because of its bottom-up approach, and its similarities with nurses’ well-known work qualities. Nurses coordinate patients care, collaborate in teams and take leadership roles. To maintain high reliability and to become quality developers, nurses need stable resources. However, professional’s logic collides with management’s logic. Expert knowledge (top-down approach) without nurses’ local knowledge (bottom-up approach) can lead to problems. Healthcare quality methods are standardized but must be used with flexibility. However, HROs ensue not only from method quality but also from work attitudes, commitment and continuous work-improvement.

Practical implications

Management can support personnel in developmental work with: continuous education, training, teamwork, knowledge sharing and cooperation. Authoritarian method structures that limit the healthcare professionals’ autonomy should be softened or abandoned.

Originality/value

The study uses theoretical concepts from HROs, which were developed for unexpected events, to explain the consequences of implementing Lean and Six Sigma in healthcare.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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