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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Gang (Gary) Wan, Dennis Clark, John Fullerton, Gail Macmillan, Deva E. Reddy, Jane Stephens and Daniel Xiao

The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of co‐browse in live chat, customers' question types, referral to subject experts, and patrons' usage patterns as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of co‐browse in live chat, customers' question types, referral to subject experts, and patrons' usage patterns as experienced in the virtual reference (VR) chat reference services at Texas A&M University Libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Chat transcripts from 2005 to 2007 were sampled and analyzed by peer reviewers. Statistical data in that period were also examined. A set of methods and a pilot study were created to define the measurement components such as question types, expert handling, and co‐browsing.

Findings

Co‐browsing is used in 38 percent of the sampled chat sessions. The Texas A&M University live chat service group considers co‐browsing a useful feature. Of questions received on VR, 84 percent are reference questions. Only 8.7 percent of the total questions or 10 percent of the reference questions need to be answered by subject experts. The use of VR increases dramatically in the past two years at the Texas A&M University. The findings also reveal users' logon patterns over weekdays and weekends.

Originality/value

The study contributes and advances understanding in the role VR plays in a large academic library and the role co‐browsing plays in VR services. The study also provides a comprehensive method for transcript and usage data analysis. It is believed that a similar methodology may be replicated elsewhere by other institutions engaging similar services or evaluation.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Richard J. Varey

Management literature is critically examined, and this finds an outmoded conception of human communication that is convenient when power is the central concern, but…

Abstract

Management literature is critically examined, and this finds an outmoded conception of human communication that is convenient when power is the central concern, but dysfunctional when constructive decision making is needed. Communication is widely taken to be the transmission of information and the reproduction of intended meanings. This view is premised on ancient classical assumptions of causality and linearity — of absolute and classifying categories, instead of relative and relational categories. Such a basis introduces intentions and causality into our understanding of communication. This reductionist thinking is seen vividly in stimulus‐response models of human influence that do not adequately explain human interaction. The critique examines social constructionist thinking that sees the world as a complex set of interrelated social phenomena constructed by people in interaction, ie in joint social action. A wealth of constructive thinking is discovered in Nordic, Germanic and Eastern sociologies and social philosophies. This is an alternative to the Western psychological perspective that is dominant and misleading in management thinking. Circular (transactional), rather than linear, models are more helpful in understanding human communication and what is required for responsive and responsible management of communication for productive business enterprise. Causal assumptions can be discarded in taking a view of communication in and of corporations (ie ‘corporative communication’) as both stimulator and stabiliser. Social, political and cultural phenomena can be more richly understood, however, if their linguistic and discursive (interactive) nature is addressed with a constructionist perspective on social reality. Communication cannot be understood without reference to knowledge, understanding, information, meaning and sense. A social constructionist theory of communication is a widened framework for the analysis of communication in a complex and holistic fashion.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Ewan Sutherland

This paper aims to review the licensing in India, including the development of universal licences and of the now infamous 2G spectrum scam.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the licensing in India, including the development of universal licences and of the now infamous 2G spectrum scam.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a case study drawing on a side range of official documents, including inquiry reports, policies, licences and court judgements.

Findings

Liberalisation of the sector introduced opportunities for lobbying and corruption that lead to very unusual market structures, with many operators and too little spectrum.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews with the principals were impossible.

Practical implications

It is now necessary for the government to adopt good governance processes, especially in respect of 4G and th inevitable consolidation of operators in a fair and equitable manner.

Social implications

The governance systems are incapable of controlling the corruption in the telecommunications sector and require substantial redesign.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to relate corporate political activity and corruption to outcomes in the telecommunications sector in India.

Details

info, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

C.S. Venkata Ratnam and V. Chandra

Analyses the magnitude and complexity of the challenge of diversity in managing people in the Indian workplace. Considers the challenges for human resource management in…

Abstract

Analyses the magnitude and complexity of the challenge of diversity in managing people in the Indian workplace. Considers the challenges for human resource management in the 1990s, and highlights the major issues and opportunities in coping with these challenges. Aims to provide direction for future empirical studies.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 17 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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