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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Dimitra Xidous, Tom Grey, Sean P. Kennelly and Desmond O’Neill

This exploratory study stems from research conducted between 2015–2018 focussing on dementia-friendly design (DFD) in hospitals (Grey T. et al. 2018). Specifically, this…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study stems from research conducted between 2015–2018 focussing on dementia-friendly design (DFD) in hospitals (Grey T. et al. 2018). Specifically, this study focusses on facilities management (FM) staff in Irish hospitals to gain a preliminary understanding of the level of knowledge and engagement of FM in the implementation of dementia-friendly hospital (DFH) design.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach based on a series of ad hoc semi-structured interviews, and an online survey. The aims were, namely, assess the extent of FM engagement in hospital works; measure the level of awareness regarding DFD; and identify facilitators and barriers to DFD in hospital settings. Participants (74) comprised FM staff in 35 Irish acute care hospitals. The research findings are based on thematic analysis of ad hoc semi-structured interviews (participants, n = 4) and survey responses (participants, n = 13).

Findings

While FM staff reported to possess important knowledge for building DFH, they also mentioned a lack of engagement of FM in design processes and hospital works.

Practical implications

The research has gained insight into the role of FM in promoting a dementia-friendly approach. Lack of or poor engagement of FM in design processes and hospital works means not fully tapping into rich expertise that would be invaluable in the development, implementation and maintenance of DFH. Universal design is a key driver for facilitating their engagement in the design, implementation and maintenance of DFH environments.

Originality/value

This is the first study exploring the role of FM in supporting a DFD approach in acute care hospitals.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1945

THE beginning of a new volume is always a matter of concern both to its Editor and to its Readers. It is usual to be able to forecast some programme of work or at least…

Abstract

THE beginning of a new volume is always a matter of concern both to its Editor and to its Readers. It is usual to be able to forecast some programme of work or at least policy, for the year then opening. At the moment what is usual is not here; we have the cessation of actual battle in Europe, it is true; but we are as involved in Asia as we have ever been and, in spite of the optimists, the end is not in view. It would be well, too, for us always to realize that while there is no battle here, there is conflict with disease, want, misery and homelessness on a scale never approached before. It is certain only that men of goodwill, amongst whom librarians hope they are numbered, are awake to the situation and anxious to help. Thus, in our pages we shall endeavour to keep open minds and ideas adapted to our changing world before our readers.

Details

New Library World, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2014

Aliette Lambert, John Desmond and Stephanie O’Donohoe

The purpose of this study is to investigate narcissism in relation to consumer identity projects. Narcissism is rarely the focus of consumer culture studies, though it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate narcissism in relation to consumer identity projects. Narcissism is rarely the focus of consumer culture studies, though it resonates with theories of individualistic, consumption-driven identities, and is argued to be a pervasive social trend within a hegemonic consumer culture that places the individual center stage. We explore these themes in the context of emerging adult identity projects given arguments about increasing narcissism in younger generations.

Methodology/approach

Identifying eight participants using the Narcissistic Personality Inventory – four with high and four with low scores – we conduct in-depth interviews to explore their identity projects, narcissistic traits, and brand relationships.

Findings

Through idiographic analysis, we find that those with lower narcissistic tendencies seem to have a communal orientation to both people and brands, whilst those with greater narcissistic tendencies tend to be individualistic and agentic. We relate the narcissistic consumer to Fromm’s “marketing character,” proposing four themes that emerge from the analysis: liquidity; an other-directed sense of self; conformity; and the commodification of self.

Social implications

This paper discusses the societal implications of individualistic consumer identity projects, highlighting narcissism, a concept relatively neglected within consumer culture theory. Narcissism carries with it a host of societal implications, not least of which is a focus on the self and a lack of concern with the wellbeing of others.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-158-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1977

The 32nd Salon International de L'Aéronautique et de L'Espace will be staged at Le Bourget—Paris Airport from June 2–12, 1977.

Abstract

The 32nd Salon International de L'Aéronautique et de L'Espace will be staged at Le Bourget—Paris Airport from June 2–12, 1977.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1973

Widgery of South, J. Ashworth and J. Willis

December 15 and 18, 1972 Farm — Contract of employment — Contract of service or contract for services — Relief worker sent by farm agency injured by negligence of farm…

Abstract

December 15 and 18, 1972 Farm — Contract of employment — Contract of service or contract for services — Relief worker sent by farm agency injured by negligence of farm manager — Whether relief worker a ‘worker’ — The Agriculture (Safety, Health and Welfare) Provisions Act, 1956 (c.49), ss.14 (1), (3), 24 (1) — Agriculture (Field Machinery) Regulations, 1962 [S.I. 1962 No. 1472], reg. 3 (1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1942

RUMOUR occupies so much of the human stage that the Editor of any library journal hesitates to do more than hope that the librarians he serves will be continuing their…

Abstract

RUMOUR occupies so much of the human stage that the Editor of any library journal hesitates to do more than hope that the librarians he serves will be continuing their work uninterrupted by attack at the time his words reach them. This atmosphere is probably a part of the reason that actuates our correspondent Glaucon, whose Letter on Our Affairs this month is unusually virile in its attack upon those who would plan an after‐war world at a time when it is yet undecided whether or no there will be a world to plan. He represents a school of thought, if that name is not rather pedantic for these excellent critics, who believe that there should be no change while conflict continues and that to plan ahead of that is futile, because, as he argues, the men who will operate that world have not been called into consultation and cannot be at present. The experience of the past shows, too, that all such planning has been completely wasted effort; the coming generation would do what it thinks fit without reference to it. Finally he seems to think that when fighting ceases the men and women who survive will be so eager to get back to what they now believe to be their comfortable former state that that desire will overrule any schemes whatsoever.

Details

New Library World, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2017

Abstract

Details

The Sustainable Nation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-379-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Darryn Mitussis, Lisa O'Malley and Maurice Patterson

This paper aims to reframe and enhance the relationship marketing literature through advocating an emphasis on process and a renewed commitment to social and informational…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reframe and enhance the relationship marketing literature through advocating an emphasis on process and a renewed commitment to social and informational exchanges.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is conceptual. It takes as its starting‐point the recognition that customers exist in complex dynamic systems in which they enact multiple roles. However, current implementations of customer relationship management (CRM) typically only view customers through a single lens (as customers) that denies firms a holistic view of those with whom they interact. Moreover, CRM systems typically embed and script actions (i.e. call centre options, offers driven by cross‐selling and segmentation) rather than enabling rich communication and facilitating appropriate responses that emerge from that communication. It is argued here that, as a consequence, both parties to a relationship need to negotiate the nature of systems that connect them, because those systems, in part, determine the content of relationship exchanges.

Practical implications

Understanding of the central argument will contribute to better organisational‐customer interactions and more informed relationship management techniques.

Originality/value

The paper argues for a renewed emphasis on processes and on social/informational exchanges within those relationships. This initiates a process of frame restructuring that will benefit RM.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1956

WE understand that the retiring President of the Library Association made a charming farewell speech to the Council in January and hope that it will duly appear in the…

Abstract

WE understand that the retiring President of the Library Association made a charming farewell speech to the Council in January and hope that it will duly appear in the L.A. Record; and that also applies to the initial address by Mr. Sydney. However it is probably desirable that the major utterance of a president shall always be made at the Annual Conference. That, however, is over eight months distant and therefore given at a time when most of the president's work for his year has been accomplished. There is much to be said for the old custom of the Association which was to instal a new president at the Annual Conferences with a whole presidential year ahead of him, but, no doubt, the Association had good reasons for making the term co‐extensive with the calendar year although we do not know now what they were. The key to Mr. Sydney's remarks was that his election recognized the work for more than half a century of the medium and smaller library which had been the backbone of the public library movement and it dwelt upon the loneliness of their librarians and the fight they had made against local obscurantism and obstacles. He wanted to get nearer in his year to librarians in all parts of the country by personal visits. We can only say that for such a task Mr. Sydney is fully equipped.

Details

New Library World, vol. 57 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Jonathan E. Schroeder and Janet L. Borgerson

This paper offers an ethical analysis of visual representation that provides criteria for and sheds light on the appropriateness dimension of marketing communications. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers an ethical analysis of visual representation that provides criteria for and sheds light on the appropriateness dimension of marketing communications. It provides a theoretically informed framework for recognizing and understanding ethical issues in visual representation.

Design/methodology/approach

An interdisciplinary conceptual review and analysis focuses on four representational conventions, synthesizing ethical concerns, to provide a broader context for recognizing and understanding ethical issues in marketing representation: face‐ism, idealization, exoticization and exclusion. This framework is discussed and applied to marketing communications.

Findings

It argues that valuations of communication appropriateness must be informed by an awareness of the ethical relationship between marketing representations and identity. It is no longer satisfactory to associate advertising solely with persuasion, rather advertising must be seen as a representational system, with pedagogical as well as strategic functions. We conclude by discussing the theoretical, research, and managerial implications that arise from an ethics of visual representation.

Originality/value

Urges moving beyond an advertising=persuasion model to encompass representation and culture in marketing communication studies. Contributes to understanding the ethical implications of marketing communication. Challenges marketers and researchers to broaden their conception of marketing communication to one more consistent with an image economy.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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