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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Arne Burisch, Jan Wrege, Annika Raatz, Jürgen Hesselbach and Reinhard Degen

Until now, the size range of most machines for precision assembly was much larger than the size of the pieces to be handled or the necessary workspace. Flexibly scalable…

Abstract

Purpose

Until now, the size range of most machines for precision assembly was much larger than the size of the pieces to be handled or the necessary workspace. Flexibly scalable miniaturised production machines can help to develop much more flexible micro production systems. The paper aims to describe the development of a micro‐parallel‐SCARA robot adapted in size to MEMS products.

Design/methodology/approach

The robot consists of a miniaturised parallel structure, which provides a high level of accuracy in a workspace of 60 × 45 × 20 mm3. It has a base area of 130 × 170 mm2 and offers four degrees of freedom.

Findings

Based on simulations, the degree of miniaturisation in terms of a smaller structure and a high level of accuracy is determined. The results show that a miniaturised hybrid robot with a plane parallel structure driven by miniaturised zero‐backlash gears and electric motors can reach a theoretical repeatability better than 1 μm.

Research limitations/implications

The first prototype provides good prospects that the concept will be used in a visionary desktopfactory. As regards the accuracy parameters of the robot, there will be further efforts to optimise the robot's structure and drive mechanism.

Practical implications

The repeatability of this first prototype is better than 14 μm. A better stiffness of optimised micro‐gears and joints of the structure will guarantee a much better repeatability.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that the Parvus is one of the smallest industrial robots for micro assembly equipped with a full range of functionalities like conventional industrial robots.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Arne Burisch and Annika Raatz

Economic, flexible and efficient micro production needs new miniaturized automation equipment (desktop factories). Micro assembly processes make demands on precision of…

Abstract

Purpose

Economic, flexible and efficient micro production needs new miniaturized automation equipment (desktop factories). Micro assembly processes make demands on precision of miniaturized robots used in desktop factories and the driving concepts, as well as miniaturized machine elements. The purpose of this paper is to investigate miniaturized drives using micro harmonic drive gears, which are promising driving concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis of the miniaturized precision robot Parvus (using micro harmonic drive gears) shows a good repeatability but also room for improvement concerning the path accuracy. Thereby the transmission error of the micro gears is identified as main disturbing influence concerning the robot's precision characteristics. Owing to the size reduction of the micro harmonic drive gear and the slightly different working principle compared to larger harmonic drive gears, the transmission error are more pronounced. Therefore, it is necessary to discuss approaches to compensate for this effect.

Findings

A very promising approach is the use of a simplified model of the kinematic error within the robot control to compensate for this disturbing effect. Measurement data of the transmission error is mathematically transformed into the frequency domain and filtered to the most important frequency modes of the function. These modes are used to build up a simplified mathematic model of the gear transmission error. A final test using this model as compensation function demonstrates that it is possible to reduce the transmission error of the micro gears by more than 50 percent.

Originality/value

The paper presents the first investigation into compensation of the transmission error of micro harmonic drive gears.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Aric Rindfleisch, Alan J. Malter and Gregory J. Fisher

Retailing thought and practice is premised on the assumption that consumers visit retailers to search for and acquire objects produced by manufacturers. In essence, we…

Abstract

Retailing thought and practice is premised on the assumption that consumers visit retailers to search for and acquire objects produced by manufacturers. In essence, we assume that the acts of consuming and producing are conducted by separate entities. This unspoken yet familiar premise shapes the questions retail scholars ask and the way retail practitioners think about their industry. Although this assumption accurately depicted retailing since the Industrial Revolution, its relevance is being challenged by a growing set of individuals who are equipped with new digital tools to engage in self-manufacturing. In this chapter, we examine self-manufacturing with a particular focus on the recent rise of desktop 3D printing. After discussing this new technology and reviewing the literature, we offer a conceptual classification of four distinct types of 3D printed objects and use this classification to inform a content analysis of over 400 of these objects. Based on this review and analysis, we discuss the implications of self-manufacturing for retailing thought and practice.

Details

Marketing in a Digital World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-339-1

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2020

Jose Orlando Montes and F. Xavier Olleros

This article explores a particular on-demand fabrication unit, the microfactory (MF). It identifies and contrasts several MFs and proposes a taxonomy. This research also…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores a particular on-demand fabrication unit, the microfactory (MF). It identifies and contrasts several MFs and proposes a taxonomy. This research also explores online manufacturing platforms (OMP) that complement certain MFs.

Design/methodology/approach

This research implements a multiple case study (71 cases in 21 countries), triangulating data available on the web with interviews, virtual/physical tours and experiential research.

Findings

The results suggest that automation and openness are the main dimensions that differentiate the MFs. Using these dimensions, a taxonomy of MFs is created. MFs with relatively low automation and high openness tend to be innovation-driven microfactories (IDMFs). MFs with high automation and low openness levels tend to be customization-driven microfactories (CDMFs). And MFs with relatively low automation and low openness tend to be classic machine shops (MSs). There are two types of OMP: closed (COMPs) and multisided (MOMPs). MOMPs can be low-end or high-end.

Practical implications

In a world where online platforms are becoming central to the reinvention of manufacturing, multisided online platforms and small fabricators will become strongly symbiotic.

Originality/value

This paper offers a clearer conceptualization of MFs and OMPs, which may help to better understand the reality of local on-demand fabrication. Moreover, it explores a new type of experiential research, which tries to describe and interpret firms through transactional activities. Many details of a firm that are difficult to capture via interviews and netnography can be revealed this way.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Ilpo Karjalainen

Abstract

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Ian Campbell

Abstract

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Donald L. Lester, John A. Parnell and Shawn Carraher

This paper aims to present the results of an empirical study identifying desktop managers who spend all of their time engaged with the computer and the effects this has on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the results of an empirical study identifying desktop managers who spend all of their time engaged with the computer and the effects this has on organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to 30 organizations in a southwestern US state to determine the presence of desktop managers.

Findings

The paper finds that desktop managers in an organization negatively impacted job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational citizenship, and the zest and vitality of subordinates.

Research limitations/implications

Only employees from 30 organizations were surveyed, and all were located in a specific geographic area of the USA.

Practical implications

The negative impact of desktop managers on organizational members points to a disturbing trend, that knowledge workers are not having their interactive communication needs with managers met.

Originality/value

The original scale developed for the study shows promise in identifying the presence of desktop managers in organizations.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Ijaz Ul Haq and Fiorenzo Franceschini

The purpose of this paper is to develop a preliminary conceptual scale for the measurement of distributed manufacturing (DM) capacity of manufacturing companies operating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a preliminary conceptual scale for the measurement of distributed manufacturing (DM) capacity of manufacturing companies operating in rubber and plastic sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-step research methodology is employed. In first step, the dimensions of DM and different levels of each dimension have been defined. In second step, an empirical analysis (cluster analysis) of database firms is performed by collecting the data of 38 firms operating in Italian mould manufacturing sector. Application case studies are then analyzed to show the use of the proposed DM conceptual scale.

Findings

A hyperspace, composed of five dimensions of DM, i.e. manufacturing localization; manufacturing technologies; customization and personalization; digitalization; and democratization of design, is developed and a hierarchy is defined by listing the levels of each dimension in an ascending order. Based on this hyperspace, a conceptual scale is proposed to measure the positioning of a generic company in the DM continuum.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical data are collected from Italian mould manufacturing companies operating in rubber and plastic sectors. It cannot be assumed that the industrial sectors in different parts of the world are operating under similar operational, regulatory and economic conditions. The results, therefore, might not be generalized to manufacturing companies operating in different countries (particularly developing countries) under different circumstances.

Originality/value

This is first preliminary scale of its kind to evaluate the positioning of companies with respect to their DM capacity. This scale is helpful for companies to compare their capacity with standard profiles and for decision making to convert the existing manufacturing operations into distributed operations.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Case study
Publication date: 28 March 2014

Shamkant Damle and Debjit Roy

Quality management among multiple business units of a large organization is often difficult if each unit is run independently in terms on their quality standards. In this…

Abstract

Quality management among multiple business units of a large organization is often difficult if each unit is run independently in terms on their quality standards. In this case, participants will discuss how Bukhari Group of Companies should establish a common brand image through standardized quality. Participants should also understand that common brand image for diverse products does not mean identical level of rejection or customer complaints. It should be understood that different markets have different tolerance for product failures. The participants can chalk out the measures the protagonist of the case should be able to take to effectively steer the Bhukari Group to achieve profits and excellence.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Mitsuru Kodama

This article will point out that fully utilizing community‐based information networks based on multimedia digital networking IT (information technology) supports…

Abstract

This article will point out that fully utilizing community‐based information networks based on multimedia digital networking IT (information technology) supports managerial speed and excellence, while making it possible to formulate a new, customer value creation business model. Aggressive IT investment by top management to build community‐based information networks, a support tool for this future network strategy, will permit business innovation based on strengthened competitiveness and enhanced customer service. This article describes some real examples of communities within companies, among companies, and between companies and their customers, using cases of companies currently making active use of community nets. Case studies of manufacturing companies demonstrate the value of community nets as a network strategy support tool that bolsters community management in companies. This article will also point out that community‐based information networks will become an important multimedia communication platform for the creation of new virtual, knowledge‐based businesses.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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