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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Buddhini Gayathri Jayatilleke, Gaya R. Ranawaka, Chamali Wijesekera and Malinda C.B. Kumarasinha

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the development and testing of an innovative mobile application using design-based research.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the development and testing of an innovative mobile application using design-based research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the process of transformation of existing printed course material into digitized content through design-based research where design, research and practice were concurrently applied through several iterations of the mobile application. For this transformation, one session each from BSc in Nursing, Bachelor of Pharmacy and Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Sciences was selected. In the first phase of the design-based research, the main research question was formulated. In the second phase, a mobile learning application (OUSL MLearn) was designed and developed to address the research question. In the third phase, this application was evaluated by five groups of stakeholders: content experts to validate the content; educational technologists to check the alignment of technical and pedagogical features; novice users to check the overall effectiveness of the application; developer to develop the application, to check the ease of usage; and researchers to identify the impact of this innovation. These stakeholders were closely involved throughout the whole process which lasted over a period of four months. At the end of this development phase, the results were reflected upon and used for further enrichment.

Findings

It was observed that the developed mobile application was accessible, appealing and pedagogically constructive for users. However, optimization, development time, technical and organizational issues, workload of academics and production costs were identified as major challenges.

Research limitations/implications

This study was based on the findings of a small sample of potential users.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for designing culturally adaptive interactive mobile applications.

Originality/value

This study will benefit practitioners to design culturally sensitive mobile learning courses and researchers to conduct design-based research.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2414-6994

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Christian Voigt and Paula M.C. Swatman

This article presents the first stage of a design‐based research project to introduce case‐based learning using existing interactive technologies in a major Australian…

Abstract

This article presents the first stage of a design‐based research project to introduce case‐based learning using existing interactive technologies in a major Australian university. The paper initially outlines the relationship between casebased learning, student interaction and the study of interactions ‐ and includes a review of research into technologies supporting varying types of interaction. We then introduce design‐based research (DBR) as a way of improving student interaction within an undergraduate e‐business course while simultaneously adding practical and theoretical insights to the literature in the field. Applying DBR, we present the learning environment used and analyse the interactions observed. The paper concludes with a summary of our findings concerning instructional means to make online interactions more meaningful and a discussion of future research activities within the project using design‐based research.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Sharon Linda Friesen

This paper is a thinking piece that examines, from the viewpoint of a Canadian pracademic, working through two definitions of pracademic, a collaborative relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a thinking piece that examines, from the viewpoint of a Canadian pracademic, working through two definitions of pracademic, a collaborative relationship between academics and practitioners and a person engaged as a practitioner and researcher. Two aspects of a pracademics scholarship is discussed, wide awakeness and praxis. The purpose of the paper is to make the case that it is pracademics who are well suited and attuned to questioning, challenging, and disrupting the ordinariness of the everyday, to envision new possibilities, and who take responsibility for mobilizing the educational community to undertake meaningful social change within an education system. A case is provided to illustrate wide-awakeness and praxis in practice. A case is provide to illustrate how wide-awakeness and praxis present themselves in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers the work of pracademics from Galileo Educational Network, located within a research-intensive university, who research and lead design-based professional learning. Drawing upon a design-based approach to guide design-based professional learning and design-based research, I highlight the ways in which wide-awakeness and praxis work themselves out in practice.

Findings

Drawing upon the two aspects of wide-awakeness and praxis, creates a liminal space for pracademics to engage with practitioners to undertake stubborn and persistent problems of practice to create important educational improvements. A key to engaging in transformational change through collaborative professionalism is to engage in sustained design-based professional learning led by pracademics.

Originality/value

This thinking piece offers the perspective of one Canadian pracademic who shows how pracademics are uniquely positioned to take on the work of transformation, agency, and social change.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2020

Sebastian Maximilian Dennerlein, Vladimir Tomberg, Tamsin Treasure-Jones, Dieter Theiler, Stefanie Lindstaedt and Tobias Ley

Introducing technology at work presents a special challenge as learning is tightly integrated with workplace practices. Current design-based research (DBR) methods are…

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Abstract

Purpose

Introducing technology at work presents a special challenge as learning is tightly integrated with workplace practices. Current design-based research (DBR) methods are focused on formal learning context and often questioned for a lack of yielding traceable research insights. This paper aims to propose a method that extends DBR by understanding tools as sociocultural artefacts, co-designing affordances and systematically studying their adoption in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The iterative practice-centred method allows the co-design of cognitive tools in DBR, makes assumptions and design decisions traceable and builds convergent evidence by consistently analysing how affordances are appropriated. This is demonstrated in the context of health-care professionals’ informal learning, and how they make sense of their experiences. The authors report an 18-month DBR case study of using various prototypes and testing the designs with practitioners through various data collection means.

Findings

By considering the cognitive level in the analysis of appropriation, the authors came to an understanding of how professionals cope with pressure in the health-care domain (domain insight); a prototype with concrete design decisions (design insight); and an understanding of how memory and sensemaking processes interact when cognitive tools are used to elaborate representations of informal learning needs (theory insight).

Research limitations/implications

The method is validated in one long-term and in-depth case study. While this was necessary to gain an understanding of stakeholder concerns, build trust and apply methods over several iterations, it also potentially limits this.

Originality/value

Besides generating traceable research insights, the proposed DBR method allows to design technology-enhanced learning support for working domains and practices. The method is applicable in other domains and in formal learning.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Paul G. LeMahieu, Lee E. Nordstrum and Ashley Seidel Potvin

This paper is second of seven in this volume elaborating different approaches to quality improvement in education. It delineates a methodology called design-based

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper is second of seven in this volume elaborating different approaches to quality improvement in education. It delineates a methodology called design-based implementation research (DBIR). The approach used in this paper is aimed at iteratively improving the quality of classroom teaching and learning practices in defined problem areas through collaborations among researchers, practitioners and other education stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the origins of the approach in US education, along with its foundations, core principles and a case application of DBIR in practice. The case focuses on the specific problem of teaching science and genetics in primary and secondary schools in a district.

Findings

The guiding principles of DBIR are: a focus on persistent problems of classroom educational practice; iterative and collaborative design and testing of innovations through partnerships between researchers and practitioners, involving multiple stakeholders’ perspectives; a concern with developing theory related to both implementation processes and classroom learning outcomes, using systematic inquiry; and development of the capacity of both researchers and practitioners to sustain changes in educational systems.

Originality/value

Few theoretical treatments and demonstration cases are currently available in US education that examine common models of quality improvement, particularly DBIR. By engaging practitioners with researchers in designing, testing and implementing reforms meaningfully, DBIR shows promise in offering significant on-the-ground benefits. This paper adds value by allowing readers to compare the DBIR method with the other improvement approaches explicated in this volume.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Chris Proctor and Paulo Blikstein

This research aims to explore how textual literacy and computational literacy can support each other and combine to create literacies with new critical possibilities. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore how textual literacy and computational literacy can support each other and combine to create literacies with new critical possibilities. It describes the development of a Web application for interactive storytelling and analyzes how its use in a high-school classroom supported new rhetorical techniques and critical analysis of gender and race.

Design/methodology/approach

Three iterations of design-based research were used to develop a Web application for interactive storytelling, which combines writing with programming. A two-week study in a high-school sociology class was conducted to analyze how the Web application's textual and computational affordances support rhetorical strategies, which in turn support identity authorship and critical possibilities.

Findings

The results include a Web application for interactive storytelling and an analytical framework for analyzing how affordances of digital media can support literacy practices with unique critical possibilities. The final study showed how interactive stories can function as critical discourse models, simulations of social realities which support analysis of phenomena such as social positioning and the use of power.

Originality/value

Previous work has insufficiently spanned the fields of learning sciences and literacies, respectively emphasizing the mechanisms and the content of literacy practices. In focusing a design-based approach on critical awareness of identity, power and privilege, this research develops tools and theory for supporting critical computational literacies. This research envisions a literacy-based approach to K-12 computer science which could contribute to liberatory education.

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Ingrid Carlgren

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the conceptual classification of learning study as a research approach.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the conceptual classification of learning study as a research approach.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is mainly theoretical, drawing on articles concerning classroom‐based research approaches as well as on some distinctions between a university‐based science of the universal and a clinical science of the particular.

Findings

The main argument of the article is that learning studies can neither be subsumed under “design and development research” (because this type of research does not include the professional actor) nor under “teacher research” (because it does not pay much attention to theoretical knowledge) nor should it be regarded as a hybrid between design experiments and lesson studies. In spite of similarities to both it should rather be described as clinical research (in analogy to medical clinical research). The use of teachers’ experiences and tacit knowing in the knowledge‐producing process, the iterative process of specification of theory, and the uniqueness of the learning problems among different groups of pupils are central aspects of a particularistic clinical research process. In comparison with lesson study, the learning study is more focussed on constructing knowledge concerning objects of learning as well as teaching‐learning relations. Teachers are included in the research as interpretative professionals making professional sense of particular educational events.

Originality/value

The paper promotes the conceptual discussion of the learning study approach, as well as of both lesson and learning studies as research approaches, i.e. as knowledge‐producing practices.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2018

Melissa Wetzel, James V. Hoffman, Beth Maloch, Saba Khan Vlach, Laura A. Taylor, Natalie Sue Svrcek, Samuel Dejulio, Ashley Martinez and Haylee Lavender

The purpose of this paper is to disrupt traditional, separate roles in preservice teacher (PT) education, moving toward hybrid mentoring spaces, which is practice-based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to disrupt traditional, separate roles in preservice teacher (PT) education, moving toward hybrid mentoring spaces, which is practice-based and a collaborative model of supporting PTs into teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

Design-based research was collaboratively enacted by a research team. The authors focused analysis on video-recorded collaborative coaching conferences, as well as shared discussions of those conferences between researchers, cooperating teachers (CTs) and field supervisors (FSs). At each of three iterations of coaching conversations, changes were made to the practice of collaborative coaching, allowing the research/design team to reflect upon practices and deepen the understanding of the development of design principles.

Findings

Three design principles of collaborative coaching grew through this research – a need for shared understanding and valuing of a coaching model amongst participants to guide decision making; a partnership between CTs and FSs in centering the PTs’ reflection on problems of practice, including the need for CTs and FSs to continually reflect on how their shifting roles toward this goal; and a relational framework including transparent communication. The authors extend these principles through two narrative vignettes and a framework that focuses on hybrid spaces for coaching.

Research limitations/implications

The research questions and design did not inquire into the relationship between collaborative coaching and PTs’ teaching practices.

Practical implications

Each narrative serves as a coaching model of how PTs, CTs and FSs, or triads, worked toward resolving practical challenges in coaching to better support PTs. The authors provide practical tools for teacher preparation programs to build collaborative relationships with teachers and schools.

Originality/value

Placing the PT into an active, leadership role in reflection on practice disrupts expert-novice and other binaries that may not serve programs that seek to prepare reflective practitioners. Previous studies have identified tensions when mentoring is not a collective process, but few studies have explored models that disrupt the two activity systems that often operate separately.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2022

Annelies Raes, Marieke Pieters and Celine Vens

This chapter reports on the design-based research study aimed at the re- and codesign of the third-year course “Introduction to Biostatistics,” part of the Bachelor

Abstract

This chapter reports on the design-based research study aimed at the re- and codesign of the third-year course “Introduction to Biostatistics,” part of the Bachelor program in Medicine. The authors aimed to make teaching more interactive, student-based and future-proof by empirically testing theoretical assumptions during iterative studies, including both quantitative and qualitative results from the perspective of the students and the teacher. The authors’ conclusion is that teacher–researcher collaboration can be an effective approach for professional development and improving innovative practices. At the same time, it allows to get a better theoretical understanding of effective teaching and learning practices. The authors hope that this chapter can inspire others to transform toward a progressive institution and looking for concrete innovative classroom practices in the context of innovative learning spaces.

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Adrian Stagg and Lindy Kimmins

Studying at university today is a complex undertaking. Not only have the characteristics of the student cohort changed significantly in recent years, but the exponential…

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Abstract

Purpose

Studying at university today is a complex undertaking. Not only have the characteristics of the student cohort changed significantly in recent years, but the exponential growth of technological innovation has also impacted markedly on the study environment. Issues such as student transition and retention are receiving considerable attention, and the quality of learning and teaching has become an important consideration. While support for students from outside the faculty is still seen as useful, it is recognised that contextualised support facilitates deeper learning. This case study aims to focus on a virtual learning environment (VLE) designed through collaboration between the Library, Learning and Teaching Support and the Faculty of Business and Law at the University of Southern Queensland.

Design/methodology/approach

The implementation of the VLE followed a design‐based research methodology focusing on an iterative approach which responded to student and staff feedback. An analysis of usage data, coupled with student feedback from reference interviews form the core of the information used to shape each evolutionary design cycle.

Findings

The results of two‐and‐a‐half years of usage data indicate that students from all disciplines within the Faculty of Business and Law used the screencasts embedded in the VLE as self‐directed, “just‐in‐time” learning resources. The qualitative comments reflect the advantages of presenting research skills tutorials in a visual format, with many commenting on a feeling of greater understanding and confidence with the research process.

Originality/value

The use of discipline‐specific screencasts offers location‐independent asynchronous learning support that can be dynamically created in response to student needs. Furthermore, it suggests that this type of reference support is more successful when produced through cross‐faculty and divisional collaboration. This VLE is accessible to all USQ Faculty of Business and Law students, but it represents a transferable, achievable model for other institutions with distance learning cohorts.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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