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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Yiğit Acar

We can define architectural design studios as environments of simulation. Within this simulation limitations of real life architectural problems are constructed, yet the…

Abstract

We can define architectural design studios as environments of simulation. Within this simulation limitations of real life architectural problems are constructed, yet the constructed reality is far from the reality of existing practice.

In Architecture: Story of Practice, Dana Cuff, makes a sociological study of the architectural design practice and in the volume she discusses design studios as limited versions of the actual design practice. As compared to the actual practice in the studio the students are alone, there isn’t a multiplicity of actors involved in the process, and the design problems are clearly defined. Cuff points out to these shortcomings and provides guidelines to overcome them.

One of the shortcomings mentioned in Cuff’s study is that: design studios do not represent the variety of actors that are present in a real life situation. Cuff suggests to include representatives of different actors in the studio practice to overcome this. If the studio fails to support itself with a variety of actors, to compensate the short coming of actors, the instructors start taking the role of many possible participants of a design process. The instructors simulate: the user, the owner, the engineer, the contractor and so on so forth. This type of an approach in the design studios leads to a certain result: the ideological construct of the instructors becomes the foundation of the constructed reality of the studio.

This study explores the ideological construction of the design studio through active involvements with undergraduate students. Through the findings of two discussion sessions, students’ own ideological positions, their relationship with the external realities and limits imposed on such relations by the studio instructor’s own ideological stances are explored.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Naima Iftikhar, Philip Crowther and Lindy Osborne Burton

This study aims to expose the various roles that teachers and students adopt in the architecture design studio. It highlights how these roles change over time, through…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to expose the various roles that teachers and students adopt in the architecture design studio. It highlights how these roles change over time, through three distinct phases, which relate to the stages of the design project. This understanding of how roles change over the semester will guide academics in understanding how to better relate to students.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a series of interviews and surveys, this study utilised a modified Delphi method to establish a consensus of opinion, both within and across the three stakeholder groups of students, tutors and coordinators/lecturers. Two rounds of data collection were conducted, with “expert” perceptions of the three stakeholder roles being established.

Findings

The roles that are adopted and perceived by students, tutors and coordinators/lecturers vary over time and respond to the stages of the design project. While there is general agreement between the perceptions of students and their teachers, there are some notable differences at key times.

Originality/value

This research builds upon previous studies into the roles of students and their teachers in the architecture design studio. It provides a nuanced map of how roles change and how interactions happen, over the duration and through the phases, of the architecture design project.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Salih Ceylan, Pınar Şahin, Serengül Seçmen, Melek Elif Somer and Kemal H. Süher

While the COVID-19 outbreak affects all aspects of life in the world, there is also a global impact in the field of education. Within the scope of the measures to control…

Abstract

Purpose

While the COVID-19 outbreak affects all aspects of life in the world, there is also a global impact in the field of education. Within the scope of the measures to control the epidemic, distance education was started shortly after the starting of the spring semester in all primary and secondary schools and universities. In this process, architectural design courses, which are one of the most fundamental courses of architectural education, started to be held in online studios. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the evaluations of architecture students about the online design studio courses carried out during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a qualitative approach to evaluate the ideas of first, second, third and fourth grade students of architectural design studios in the host university. A questionnaire was directed to students in order to see their opinions about the online design studio education.

Findings

Results shows that students think the most prominent benefit of online studios appears in the use of digital tools. Another important result is that if they are equipped with the necessary tools and given the chance to realize themselves, students can work efficiently even in the distance education process.

Originality/value

This study is important in terms of learning the expectations of students from the online process and to identify important issues that should be considered for the next semesters. In addition, this study will serve as a basis for comparative evaluation of architectural education during and after the epidemic. In this context, the study will shed light on future academic research.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Sezin Tanrıöver, Zeynep Ceylanlı and Pınar Sunar

Architecture as a discipline has gone through a serious change since the post-war period and became a recognized profession focusing on human needs in the physical…

Abstract

Architecture as a discipline has gone through a serious change since the post-war period and became a recognized profession focusing on human needs in the physical environments. The issue of educating new practitioners for the transforming field has turned out to be the subject of a lively debate for the last 10-20 years.

The current position and approach in design studios of Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design of Bahçeşehir University, were thought to be worth putting forth and sharing with the design community to initiate a discussion for the future of the discipline in general. Consequently, this study was structured to present a paradigm in Interior Architecture Education by focusing on the case of Bahçeşehir University (BAU) Interior Architecture and Environmental Design Department design studio education. The four-year program consisting of eight academic semesters, is addressing the combination of two methods; namely, horizontally organized design studios (HODS), and vertically organized studio groups (VODS). Currently, this approach is subject to many discussions within the department due to many aspects. This approach was tested, evaluated and criticized through student and instructor comments collected via questionnaires. Results were collected and interpreted through three main issues of learning, teaching and assessment.

Study moving from general design studio education to the case of Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design of Bahçeşehir University, concludes with general comments, mentioning the lack of literature on design studio education, and the significance of sharing different approaches and applications. Lastly and specifically, the revisions following the completion of the experiment in the department was put forth. With reference to the case of BAU, initiating a discussion regarding current design studio education was intended.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2010

Elif E. Turkkan, Inci Basa and Meltem O. Gurel

A major aim of the design studio is to educate students to be well-equipped designers. To do so, a student should be able to grasp the divergent information of various…

Abstract

A major aim of the design studio is to educate students to be well-equipped designers. To do so, a student should be able to grasp the divergent information of various courses and integrate that knowledge into their design problems. But are students aware of the emphasis placed on incorporating different curriculum courses into the design studio? Do they find it beneficial while developing a design project? To what extent do they think this integration has an impact on their success in the design studio and in their adaptation to professional practice? This paper seeks to find out whether the integration between the design studio and other curriculum courses is productive from students' perspectives and determine if there is a consensus between students and instructors on the significance of transferring knowledge from curriculum courses to design projects. In addition, the paper examines the position of the design studio as an integrative medium between education and practice in the Turkish context.

Details

Open House International, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Umut Tuğlu Karsli

Design studio courses take place at the core of education disciplinary design such as architecture and interior architecture. Studios in which design studio courses are…

Abstract

Design studio courses take place at the core of education disciplinary design such as architecture and interior architecture. Studios in which design studio courses are conducted can also be used for other practical courses as well. Another important feature of these studios is that they are extensively used by students for individual or group work other than during class hours. Since the students, either on their own or with the project coordinator, experience design process in these studios, their spatial characteristics are highly significant to conduct this process effectively. Within this scope, the aim of the research is to evaluate open and cell type studios commonly used in traditional architecture education through Post-occupancy evaluation (POE) approach, to discuss to what extent these studios meet the spatial requirements of today’s instructional methods and to develop a suggestion for design studio spatial use by taking the strengths and weaknesses of these studios. Accordingly, technical, physical and behavioral variables determining the performance of design studios within the context of spatial requirements have been identified through reviewing the related literature. In framework of a case study, a survey formed with the aforementioned variables was administered to architecture and interior architecture students studying in open and cell type design studios in order to measure their spatial performance. Followingly, in the final part of the study, referring to survey results and evaluation of spatial requirements of today’s instructional methods and tools, a combi design studio space organization has been suggested.

Details

Open House International, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Noam Austerlitz and Avigail Sachs

Based on the authors teaching experience, this essay presents an example of how the traditional design studio might be modified so as to foster democratic participation…

Abstract

Based on the authors teaching experience, this essay presents an example of how the traditional design studio might be modified so as to foster democratic participation and egalitarian communication between the participating students and instructors. Open communication in the studio is seen as the key to incorporating important values such as collaboration, community and respect for the every day environment into the studio's hidden curriculum. The essay begins by discussing the potentials for and obstacles to meaningful communication in the studio. This discussion is followed by a description of a modified studio project that included continuous role-playing on the part of the students. The final discussion outlines and evaluates how these modifications enabled students to use previous knowledge and everyday language and permitted the discussion of topics not usually debated in the studio. The students, in their assumed roles, became critics, clients and members of a team of designers. Hence these changes influenced the distribution of power in the studio and the students gained more control over their learning experience.

Details

Open House International, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Rabee M. Reffat

This paper introduces an alternative teaching model in a virtual architectural design studio, its application, impacts and constraints. This model aims for achieving…

Abstract

This paper introduces an alternative teaching model in a virtual architectural design studio, its application, impacts and constraints. This model aims for achieving collaborative learning through facilitating students to Inhabit, Design, Construct and Evaluate (IDCE) their designs collaboratively in a multi-user real-time 3D virtual environment platform (Activeworlds). The application of this model in virtual design studio (VDS) teaching has favorably impacted students' motivation for active, creative and explorative learning, social dynamics between studio participants. It also fostered learning electronic communication, collaboration techniques and etiquette in addition to design technology. The model assisted in developing collaborative experience and shared responsibility. However, there are some drawbacks of the virtual environment platform that hindered having a responsive design environment to users' needs with especially in modeling and rate of viewing. The advantages and constraints of applying the IDCE teaching model in a multi-user real-time 3D virtual environment for first year students at the University of Sydney are addressed in this paper.

Details

Open House International, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Duaa Al Maani, Saba Alnusairat and Amer Al-Jokhadar

This study explored the virtual design studio as a transformative learning model for the disaster and resilience context, including the factors that affect students'…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explored the virtual design studio as a transformative learning model for the disaster and resilience context, including the factors that affect students' perceptions and experiences of the quality of this adaptation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data obtained from 248 students who took online design studios during the lockdown in 15 universities in Jordan highlight many factors that make the experience of the online design studio more challenging. Despite these challenges, strongly positive aspects of the online studio were evident and widely discussed.

Findings

A model of a hyper-flexible design studio in which students can have a direct contact with their instructor when needed – in addition to online activities, reviews and written feedback – is highly recommended for the beginner years. This HyFlex model will enrich students' learning and understanding of the fundamentals of design and ensure that technology solutions deliver significant and sustainable benefits.

Originality/value

For students, studying architecture necessitates a fundamental shift in the learning mode and attitude in the transition from school. Beginner students are often surprised by the new mode of learning-by-doing and the new learner identity that they must adopt and adapt to in the design studio. Moreover, due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, architecture teaching has moved online. Both instructors and students are experiencing dramatic changes in their modes of teaching and learning due to the sudden move from on-campus design studios to a virtual alternative, with only the bare minimum of resources and relevant experience.

Details

Open House International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2020

Mahmoud Reza Saghafi

In the context of architecture education, design studio projects usually start with “research” on the design theme and the context, but often there is no strong link…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of architecture education, design studio projects usually start with “research” on the design theme and the context, but often there is no strong link between this research and its application in the project and the resultant design product. This paper explores strategies which link knowledge acquisition and knowledge application in design studio teaching and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

These strategies have been applied in several design studios and master’s theses and involve sixteen years of research by the author through observation, surveys and analysis of student work.

Findings

The results show that these strategies are not limited to the design studio, with more than half of them (eight out of fourteen) also applicable in theoretical subjects that sit outside the design studio unit and generate knowledge of relevance to studio projects. As such, the paper advocates for a multi-level approach involving the following: course design and curriculum development, teaching and learning pedagogies and organizational decisions regarding the deployment of staff as for collaborative team-based teaching.

Research limitations/implications

The results also recognize the relevance of problem-based and project-based learning to the broader higher education context and its dependence on a collaborative approach.

Originality/value

This paper which synthesizes this work contributes to the literature on architecture pedagogy, specifically that related to the integration of theoretical and practical subjects.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

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