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1 – 10 of over 6000
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2019

Michael Sony and Subhash Naik

Six Sigma is a well-established powerful business strategy for achieving operational excellence (OPEX). However, previous studies have suggested that the Six Sigma may…

Abstract

Purpose

Six Sigma is a well-established powerful business strategy for achieving operational excellence (OPEX). However, previous studies have suggested that the Six Sigma may negatively impact organizational creativity and innovation. The C-K theory is one of the most widely used technique for design reasoning which promotes the creativity and innovation. The purpose of this paper is to integrate the Six Sigma methodology and C-K theory for enhancing innovative capacity of Six Sigma for achieving OPEX.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes an integration methodology of C-K theory and Six Sigma using the extant literature. Also, a case study is conducted based on the proposed integration model.

Findings

The paper suggests a step-by-step integration methodology for integrating Six Sigma with C-K theory for both (DMAIC and DMADV). The methodology when applied to a live case in mining logistics the results are very encouraging. The solution was cost effective and also technically superior compared to previous solutions.

Practical implications

The paper proposes a step-by-step methodology for the integration of Six Sigma with C-K tools. The methodology is practically applied in a live case. Organizations can use findings from this paper to implement an integration model of Six Sigma with C-K theory.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that proposes an integration methodology of Six Sigma with C-K theory to enhance the innovation capability to achieve the OPEX.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

TR Sreeram and Asokan Thondiyath

The purpose of this paper is to present a combined framework for system design using Six Sigma and Lean concepts. Systems Engineering has evolved independently and there…

1318

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a combined framework for system design using Six Sigma and Lean concepts. Systems Engineering has evolved independently and there are numerous tools and techniques available to address issues that may arise in the design of systems. In the context of systems design, the application of Six Sigma and Lean concepts results in a flexible and adaptable framework. A combined framework is presented here that allows better visualization of the system-level components and their interactions at parametric level, and it also illuminates gaps that make way for continuous improvement. The Deming’s Plan-Do-Check-Act is the basis of this framework. Three case studies are presented to evaluate the application of this framework in the context of Systems Engineering design. The paper concludes with a summary of advantages of using a combined framework, its limitations and scope for future work.

Design/methodology/approach

Six Sigma, Lean and Systems Engineering approaches combined into a framework for collaborative product development.

Findings

The present framework is not rigid and does not attempt to force fit any tools or concepts. The framework is generic and allows flexibility through a plug and play type of implementation. This is important, as engineering change needs vary constantly to meet consumer demands. Therefore, it is important to engrain flexibility in the development of a foundational framework for design-encapsulating improvements and innovation. From a sustainability perspective, it is important to develop techniques that drive rationality in the decisions, especially during tradeoffs and conflicts.

Research limitations/implications

Scalability of the approach for large systems where complex interactions exist. Besides, the application of negotiation techniques for more than three persons poses a challenge from a mathematical context. Future research should address these in the context of systems design using Six Sigma and Lean techniques.

Practical implications

This paper provides a flexible framework for combining the three techniques based on Six Sigma, Lean and Systems Engineering.

Social implications

This paper will influence the construction of agent-based systems, particularly the ones using the Habermas’s theory of social action as the basis for product development.

Originality/value

This paper has not been published in any other journal or conference.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Ricardo Bañuelas and Jiju Antony

Six sigma has been considered a business strategy that employs a well‐structured continuous improvement methodology to tackle process variability and drive out waste from…

5020

Abstract

Six sigma has been considered a business strategy that employs a well‐structured continuous improvement methodology to tackle process variability and drive out waste from the business processes using statistical tools and techniques. This paper first examines the differences and similarities of sixsigma improvement methodology compared with the DFSS approach. This work illustrates the use of analytical hierarchy process (AHP), a multiple criteria decision‐making technique, for the evaluation of sixsigma projects in order to determine when the sixsigma approach becomes a priority over DFSS. The use of AHP to determine the transition from six sigma to design for six sigma represents a major challenge to many researchers today, as very little has been done on this subject.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2020

Mihir Solanki and Darshak Desai

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how Six Sigma methodology has been applied in a small-scale foundry industry to improve the overall first-pass material yield…

352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how Six Sigma methodology has been applied in a small-scale foundry industry to improve the overall first-pass material yield and quality, with a view to the product and the process.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers have reported this paper based on a case study carried out in industry using the Six Sigma Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve and Control (DMAIC) and its application in improving the manufacturing process of a foundry shop.

Findings

Identified root causes are validated and countermeasures are implemented for improvement. As a result of this case study, the overall first-pass yield of the sand casting process is improved to 78.88% from the previous yield of 67%. For product-specific case, yield is improved by 18% through the improved gating system design. Sigma level of the process is improved to 3.08 from baseline 2.21. Key lessons learned from this case study are mentioned in the current study.

Research limitations/implications

This case study provides a standard road map and motivates small-scale foundry industries to implement Six Sigma methodology for productivity improvement, especially in jobbing foundry. The presented paper is based on a single case study, and the results are limited to the company only. Also, one of the reasons for low process yield is slag creation, which is not covered here, as it is a concern of the material quality supplied by the vendor. However, the approach of this paper is generic for learning perspective.

Practical implications

This case study provides a standard road map and motivates small-scale foundry industries to implement Six Sigma methodology for productivity improvement, especially in jobbing foundry. Through the effective application of Six Sigma quality initiative, how a quantum jump in financial aspect could be gain, has been demonstrated.

Originality/value

This research study showcases step-by-step implementation of Six Sigma-DMAIC methodology at a small-scale foundry industry. This paper could serve as a unique roadmap for practitioners and academicians to improve the material productivity of the foundry industry both ways, product and process.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

G.Y. Hong and T.N. Goh

The success of Six Sigma in manufacturing in the past decade has encouraged moves to explore Six Sigma applications to other domains, such as the software industry, for

5596

Abstract

The success of Six Sigma in manufacturing in the past decade has encouraged moves to explore Six Sigma applications to other domains, such as the software industry, for performance improvement. Owing to the uniqueness of software processes, there have been disagreements as to whether Six Sigma should be adopted in software design processes. In this paper, we discuss the applicability of the Six Sigma framework to software. Some myths and facts about the Six Sigma Software Program (6SSP) are discussed. We also address some common misconceptions on the potential of Six Sigma in software, as well as some actual practical challenges. A framework is suggested for practitioners and managers interested in exploiting the benefits of statistical analysis in general, and 6SSP in particular. Some ideas are also raised on what remains to be done to make 6SSP work.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Alan F. Chow, Treena Gillespie Finney and Kelly C. Woodford

This paper aims to bring together the concepts of Six Sigma into the process of training design and training transfer.

2986

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to bring together the concepts of Six Sigma into the process of training design and training transfer.

Design/methodology/approach

The concepts of the paper are supported with an actual example of their application to practice. The industrial example shows where the inclusion of the concepts of Six Sigma can make positive contributions to the design and transfer of training processes.

Findings

The application of the concepts to training design and transfer showed a positive contribution through a more structured process. Including the concepts of Six Sigma within the process of training design and transfer will provide the organization with additional support and structure to improve the overall success of the training design process, and improve the impact and effectiveness of the training itself.

Research limitations/implications

The single example of application may limit the successfulness of the overall concept to training design overall. Based on the successful application in one industrial training setting, the impression that the concepts will adequately translate to additional applications is favorable.

Practical implications

The success of the application shown in this paper suggests that further success is likely in other similar industrial applications. Expanding the application to other job training design processes should improve the overall process of training design in other areas and industries.

Originality/value

Training design and transfer are critical components to all areas of an organization that conducts any type of training. Application of these and other improvement methods and tools will improve the overall performance of the training process and the effectiveness of the training.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 59 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2010

Gregory H. Watson and Camille F. DeYong

The purpose of this paper is to describe the historical approach to concurrent engineering (CE) which has resulted in product line management (PLM) and then evaluates the…

2231

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the historical approach to concurrent engineering (CE) which has resulted in product line management (PLM) and then evaluates the theoretical models that have been proposed for design for Six Sigma (DFSS) in order to determine which model is able to provide the most consistent approach with historical development of PLM.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach begins with an overview of the approach taken by the Union of Japanese Scientists and Engineers (JUSE) in the development of a coherent quality methodology for structured analysis and problem solving – the Deming Wheel of plan‐do‐check‐act (PDCA) which has become the standard model in Japanese total quality management to define a logical decomposition in process management. In Japan, PDCA is the single logical model which has been broadly accepted as the construct for understanding how to develop both strategic and operational quality methods. The second step in the approach is to examine a similar American development of the model for statistical problem solving that is applied in the Six Sigma method for statistical problem solving: define‐measure‐analyze‐improve‐control (DMAIC). Next, the paper examines the historical sequence in the way the product development process has developed over the past forty years, with emphasis on its military origins (especially CE) and which resulted in the generic model for PLM. The final part of this paper examines the models that have been proposed to implement DFSS over the past ten years and evaluate their logical congruence with the engineering community's design process.

Findings

Problems in alignment with the engineering design process were identified with all of the DFSS models and with the non‐structured or “heuristic” approach to developing a coherent body of knowledge related to DFSS.

Originality/value

This paper provides a challenge to the quality community as well as to the academic community. The paper points out the need for rigorous examination of logical models that are proposed for guiding the thinking of practitioners in the use of quality methods for both the engineering of products and business systems. An expose of lack of rationality in the way an approach to DFSS has been investigated calls for more responsibility in the management of the development of this body of knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Ricardo Bañuelas and Jiju Antony

11559

Abstract

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Cristina Alcaide-Muñoz and Leopoldo J. Gutierrez-Gutierrez

The aim of this paper is to analyse the relationship between Six Sigma methodology and organisational ambidexterity (exploitation and exploration orientations). For this…

1028

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to analyse the relationship between Six Sigma methodology and organisational ambidexterity (exploitation and exploration orientations). For this purpose, this study describes how Six Sigma practices may enhance both orientations simultaneously, contributing to organisational ambidexterity and performance improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was adopted as the research methodology. The authors analysed 512 publications in Social Science Citation Index journals in fields such as management, business, operation research management science, planning development, behavioural sciences, interdisciplinary social sciences and applied psychology from 1987 to 2016, as the first development and adoption of Six Sigma was in 1987 by Motorola.

Findings

This analysis describes how Six Sigma emphasises not only useful practices for exploitation orientation, such as customer input, design for manufacturability or improvement and control of processes, but also explorative practices, such as discovery, novelty or innovation. Consequently, an adequate combination of all these practices may enhance organisational ambidexterity and organisational success.

Research limitations/implications

This study relies exclusively on previously published literature that fulfilled the selection criteria described in the search methodology. Further empirical research is necessary to test the propositions included in this paper.

Practical implications

This study has important implications for academics, practitioners and employers, as it furnishes new theoretical insights to the scarce literature that studies the relationship between quality management practices and organisational ambidexterity. The authors provide a better understanding of Six Sigma philosophy and some fresh and new insight on how Six Sigma practices may help organisation develop distinctive competitive competences by its influence over exploration and exploitation orientations (ambidexterity). Therefore, it might be of interest to those practitioners interested in achieving a successful competitive position and discover emerging business opportunities, as it may provide some guidance on the important implication of Six Sigma practices over exploration and exploitation orientations.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights into the non-existent literature about Six Sigma and organisational ambidexterity and to the scarce literature about quality management and ambidexterity. Propositions on how Six Sigma practices benefit organisational ambidexterity are also suggested.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Rupa Mahanti and Jiju Antony

The aim of this paper is to highlight the application of six sigma, software engineering techniques and simulation to software development with a view to improving the…

4137

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to highlight the application of six sigma, software engineering techniques and simulation to software development with a view to improving the software process and product.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper attempts to integrate six sigma and simulation to define, analyse, measure and predict various elements of software development (such as cost, schedule, defects) that influence software quality, thereby helping the software personnel take necessary measures early in the development process to improve the software processes and remove defects. Simulation results provide qualitative and quantitative suggestions on the ways to change the software process to achieve six sigma quality. The integration of six sigma and CMM and the role of knowledge management in software organisations have been taken into account.

Findings

Most software organisations operate between 2.3 and 3 sigma level. This paper presents a framework for definition, measurement, and analysis of important elements of the software product and process using six sigma tools and exploits the use of simulation in bringing six sigma improvements. Case studies have been presented to demonstrate the findings.

Research limitations/implications

Application of the techniques presented in this paper would definitely improve software organisations' processes and product.

Practical implications

The adoption of methodologies outlined in this paper in software companies would enable them to attain improvements in terms of cost, schedule and quality.

Originality/value

The integration of simulation with six sigma applied to software development is novel in this paper. This paper will be valuable for quality professionals and management personnel in software organisations.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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