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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

J. Lyu and A. Gunasekaran

There is a growing understanding that the quality of a product should be built in at the design phase. More and more reports have shown that this kind of approach, named…

Abstract

There is a growing understanding that the quality of a product should be built in at the design phase. More and more reports have shown that this kind of approach, named design for quality, can benefit the company to make it much more competitive. In many Eastern countries such as Japan and Taiwan, such concepts have been used for a while. The so‐called product oriented design (POD) and quality function deployment (QFD) are widely used in many industries. This may be one of the main reasons why many Eastern countries have had a very high economic growth rate during the past two decades. For a coastal nation, the shipbuilding industry is essential for defence purposes. However, to run a shipyard efficiently is not an easy job due to several of its characteristics. They are: (1) the product (a ship) size is very large both in volume and weight and each product has thousands of different components; (2) the design, planning and manufacturing process overlap very significantly and the concept of “teamwork” is therefore greatly emphasized; and (3) the production process is very complex and complicated with very many interdependences. With these characteristics, the methods of “design for quality” and “design for manufacture” seem to be ideal tools for the shipbuilding industry to maintain product quality while raising the shipyard′s efficiency. Describes how a shipbuilding company in Taiwan can apply these positive concepts to improve its performance. Discusses several practical examples to illustrate these concepts.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Evert Gummesson

Stresses the necessity of systematic design of services. Asserts that systematic design is a necessary pre‐requisite for service quality. Describes how the Nordic School…

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1937

Abstract

Stresses the necessity of systematic design of services. Asserts that systematic design is a necessary pre‐requisite for service quality. Describes how the Nordic School of Services has found that service quality is key to competitiveness and profitability. Asserts that gradually service design stands out as the master key. Introduces the concepts of servuction quality and design quality ‐ the two sources of service quality. Discusses techniques for service design and the relationship between profits, costs and quality. Concludes by summarizing a service design strategy.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2015

Afaq Hyder Chohan, Adi Irfan and Jihad Awad

This research has been conducted to determine the design quality indicators and parameters for affordable housing in Karachi Pakistan. The absence of quality in Karachi…

Abstract

This research has been conducted to determine the design quality indicators and parameters for affordable housing in Karachi Pakistan. The absence of quality in Karachi housing resulted from various factors ranging from policy failure, violation of bylaws, population, housing scarcity and non availability of quality parameters etc. The amalgamation of these factors eventually lowers the quality of housing and ultimately results deficient housing design and construction. Because of this trend the end users experience the nuisance of unplanned maintenance and bear the tax of heavy repair and reworks. Significance of research has been accomplished through developing design quality models for both professional and users. This research has eventually evaluated forty eight (48) quality indicators for housing design (QIHD) from listed 65 design quality variables farmed in seven sections. This research concludes that existing design quality of affordable housing in Karachi could be enhanced through improving the design, construction, services, site development and neighborhood and sustainability. The QIHD model will provide the opportunity for design and construction professionals of city to rethink their housing design intellect in context of the housing quality.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Sangeeta Sahney

Educational institutes must embrace the principles of total quality management (TQM) if they seek to remain competitive, and survive and succeed in the long run. An…

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1964

Abstract

Purpose

Educational institutes must embrace the principles of total quality management (TQM) if they seek to remain competitive, and survive and succeed in the long run. An educational institution must embrace the principles of quality management and incorporate them into all of their activities. Starting with a theoretical background, the paper outlines the results of a study conducted on both internal and external customers of the educational system, with select engineering and management institutes as foci of study. The study is an attempt toward developing an integrated customer-centric model of quality management in education, through the use of multiple methodologies so as to be able to evaluate service quality; prioritize improvement of service; and guide and develop educational services by incorporating the voice of the customer (VOC). The purpose of this paper is to establish the prioritization for improvement of service design of an educational system through incorporation of the VOC, be it internal or external customers, through the use of multiple methodologies, leading to generalization of results.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses multiple methodologies with various techniques for analysis through the application of the SERVQUAL; quality function deployment (QFD); interpretive structural modeling (ISM); and path analysis. The SERVQUAL was applied to identify the gap and determine the level of service quality. Following this, QFD, ISM and path analysis were used to identify the set of minimum design characteristics/quality components that would meet the requirements the various internal and external customers of the educational system. The QFD was used to identify the set of minimum design characteristics/quality components that meet the requirements of the various internal and external customers of the educational system. The ISM and path analysis were used to identify and prioritize the design characteristics/quality components that would meet the requirements the various internal and external customers of the educational system.

Findings

The findings from the various techniques were amalgamated, and proposed as an integrated model of TQM in higher education. The study helped identify with a customer perspective, the quality components which would help design TQM for higher education institutions in India.

Research limitations/implications

The paper could be useful to government bodies, funding agencies, policy makers and administrators in developing a system that could lead to satisfaction of both internal and external customers of the educational system.

Originality/value

The study includes within its scope the varied customers of the educational system, namely, internal and external customers of the educational system; the internal customers being the faculty and the administrative staff, and the external customers being the students and the industry (as the employer). This is yet to be seen in other research studies. Also, the integration of the multiple tools and their application to the field of higher education in India, has not yet been made available in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Marcel Grein, Annika Wiecek and Daniel Wentzel

Existing research on product design has found that a design’s complexity is an important antecedent of consumers’ aesthetic and behavioural responses. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing research on product design has found that a design’s complexity is an important antecedent of consumers’ aesthetic and behavioural responses. This paper aims to shed new light on the relationship between design complexity and perceptions of design quality by taking the effects of consumers’ naïve theories into account.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses of this paper are tested in a series of three experiments.

Findings

The findings from three studies show that the extent to which consumers prefer more complex product designs to simpler ones depends on the extent to which they believe that the complexity of a design is indicative of the effort or of the talent of the designers involved in the design process. These competing naïve theories, in turn, are triggered by contextual information that consumers have at their disposal, such as the professional background of a designer or the brand that is associated with a particular design.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to a design's complexity as the central design element and to the effects of two naïve theories. Future research may also take other design factors and consumer heuristics into account.

Practical implications

This research reveals that the extent to which managers may successfully introduce both complex and simple designs may depend on the reputation of a company’s designers and the prestige of a brand.

Originality/value

This research examines design complexity from a novel theoretical perspective and shows that the effect of design complexity on perceptions of design quality is contingent on two specific naïve theories of consumers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Chaudhry Muhammad Nadeem Faisal, Daniel Fernandez-Lanvin, Javier De Andrés and Martin Gonzalez-Rodriguez

This study examines the effect of design quality (i.e. appearance, navigation, information and interactivity) on cognitive and affective involvement leading to continued…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the effect of design quality (i.e. appearance, navigation, information and interactivity) on cognitive and affective involvement leading to continued intention to use the online learning application.

Design/methodology/approach

We assume that design quality potentially contributes to enhance the individual's involvement and excitement. An experimental prototype is developed for collecting data used to verify and validate the proposed research model and hypotheses. A partial-least-squares approach is used to analyze the data collected from the participants (n = 662).

Findings

Communication, aesthetic and information quality revealed to be strong determinants of both cognitive and affective involvement. However, font quality and user control positively influence cognitive involvement, while navigation quality and responsiveness were observed as significant indicators of affective involvement. Lastly, cognitive and affective involvement equally contribute to determining the continued intention to use.

Research limitations/implications

This study will draw the attention of designers and practitioners towards the perception of users for providing appropriate and engaging learning resources.

Originality/value

Prevalent research in the online context is focused primarily on cognitive and utilization behavior. However, these works overlook the implication of design quality on cognitive and affective involvement.

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Ebru Ayas, Jörgen Eklund and Shigekazu Ishihara

This paper seeks to deal with affective design of waiting areas (servicescapes) and has twofold aims. The first, is to explore affective values for waiting areas. The…

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2474

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to deal with affective design of waiting areas (servicescapes) and has twofold aims. The first, is to explore affective values for waiting areas. The second, is to identify interactions between physical design attributes and affective values.

Design/methodology/approach

This study included a free association method for data collection, applying Kansei engineering methodology to extract design solutions relating to specific feelings. The study was undertaken at six primary health centres in Östergötland County, Sweden. In total, 88 participants (60 patients and 28 staff) were interviewed.

Findings

The selected waiting areas show significant differences for their perceived affective qualities. The most desired feeling for creating affective values is found to be “calm”. The core design attributes contributing to this feeling are privacy, colours, child play‐areas and green plants. Good design of lighting, seating arrangements and a low sound level are also important design attributes to give a more complete design solution.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides useful insights for understanding affective needs in servicescapes, and it provides design suggestions. The results have not been analysed separately for gender or different age groups.

Practical implications

The paper proposes a framework model to be applied when dealing with affective values in servicescapes.

Originality/value

This paper makes an original contribution to understand affective values towards the physical environment in servicescape design. It offers a methodology to study complex environments with many alternative design solutions using limited resources. Moreover, this study uses a combination of a free association method and Rough Sets theory in affective design.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Antonio Lanzotti and Pietro Tarantino

This paper aims at defining a structured process of continuous innovation in the product concept development phase by a statistical‐based Kansei engineering (KE) approach…

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2017

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at defining a structured process of continuous innovation in the product concept development phase by a statistical‐based Kansei engineering (KE) approach. It consists in the identification of quality elements satisfying both functional and emotional user needs, i.e. the total quality elements.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is developed integrating results from Kano and KE analysis. Three statistical methods considered to be suitable for KE study, are used: supersaturated design for concept configuration, ordinal logistic regression for data analysis, and EVA method for quality evaluation of the optimal concept. These methods are compared with the most used ones in KE regarding their efficacy, efficiency and easiness of use. An innovative procedure to exhibit concepts in a KE session is also presented. It uses the abstraction and association idea principles to elicit users' grade of agreement for a particular Kansei word.

Findings

The proposed approach is fully exploited through a case study on train interior design, developed in a virtual reality (VR) laboratory. The evaluation of comfort improvements obtained by means of a new handle and handrail design is carried on with expert users in VR. A consistent increase of a quality index, by using the defined approach, was obtained.

Originality/value

This work aims at contributing to the conception of new product solutions, which are appealing and saleable. The availability of virtual reality technologies and software capable to manage complex statistical analyses, will concretely aid designers and engineers in the ideation of high‐emotional‐quality products, which can be helpful for innovative enterprises to maintain and even increase their market position.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

A. Gunasekaran

In this paper, an attempt has been made to develop an integrated product development‐quality management (IPD‐QM) system by integrating the concepts of concurrent…

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3390

Abstract

In this paper, an attempt has been made to develop an integrated product development‐quality management (IPD‐QM) system by integrating the concepts of concurrent engineering (CE) and TQM. These two concepts have been considered in the past as a separate identity. However, there is a need to develop a system that would consider quality management and improvement at the design stage by incorporating the principles of total quality management (TQM) at every stage of the design and other upstream and downstream value adding activities. TQM has been considered with reference to firm orientation and identifies market advantages, that are product design efficiency, process efficiency and product reliability. The special feature of the system proposed here is that it advises designers, product developers and process planners on improvements that can be made to the design to improve product quality and manufacturing efficiency, and customer satisfaction. Also, a framework has been discussed in this paper for the integration of CE and TQM in manufacturing.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Julian D. Booker

The improvement of the quality of design and the reduction of failure related cost is seen as a crucial competitive requirement for UK manufacturing industry. To achieve…

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2171

Abstract

The improvement of the quality of design and the reduction of failure related cost is seen as a crucial competitive requirement for UK manufacturing industry. To achieve these goals, industry must adopt current methods in support of design for quality (DFQ) for analysing potential problems and predicting quality, and integrate these effectively with the appropriate stages of their new product development process. The utilisation and success rate of these techniques in UK companies is, however, relatively low compared to those in countries such as the USA and Japan. In this paper, the fundamental concepts and key areas of opportunity in design improvement using the main DFQ support techniques are reviewed and a framework for their application and integration is presented to support concurrent product development. The typical experiences and problems concerning the application and implementation of techniques are discussed and areas where new research should be directed are touched on so that DFQ techniques may better enhance industrial practice in the achievement of high quality products.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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