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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

R. Bäβler

THE increasing pressure of national and international competition is forcing firms to rationalise even further, especially in the field of assembly. In order to perform…

Abstract

THE increasing pressure of national and international competition is forcing firms to rationalise even further, especially in the field of assembly. In order to perform assembly tasks with the least possible expenditure of time, assembly facilities, space requirements and personnel, it has become necessary to include these objectives in the development stage of the product. Therefore, assembly‐oriented design now provides a good opportunity for rationalisation.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Y.J. Lin and R. Farahati

This paper presents a versatile and economical knowledge‐based assembly design of blade and shell assemblies by employing behavioral modeling concepts. Behavioral modeling…

Abstract

This paper presents a versatile and economical knowledge‐based assembly design of blade and shell assemblies by employing behavioral modeling concepts. Behavioral modeling is a new generation CAD concept aimed at achieving ultimately optimum results with the efforts made in the early stage of the product development cycle. As a result, the assembly process of any odd‐configured parts such as torque converter blades, can be accurately planned, and made adaptable to all potential in‐process alterations due to either changes of components design or that of the assembly kinematics. Optimum assembly design is achieved when the volumetric interference meets a desired value based on an expert's determination. Experimental verification of the proposed optimum assembly design conducted in Luk, Inc. with two different blades' assemblies demonstrates satisfactory results.

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Assembly Automation, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Albert C.K. Choi and Prasanthi Guda

Assembly is a necessary and important part of any manufacturing process. Computer aided production engineering allows production engineers to create an on‐screen virtual…

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1213

Abstract

Assembly is a necessary and important part of any manufacturing process. Computer aided production engineering allows production engineers to create an on‐screen virtual manufacturing environment which graphically displays and simulates actual manufacturing processes. This is an attempt to analyse the assembly process for a computer mouse, using both the Boothroyd and Dewhurst design for assembly (DFA) and Tecnomatix’s Dynamo software package. A mouse designed in Unigraphics has been the product considered and the assembly process has been analysed. Some of the steps involved in the analysis are explained in detail and the observations and results are discussed along with redesign suggestions. These software systems can help identify some of the technical problems that can possibly be encountered in real life production and can effectively be used to guide the design process. Product assembly, analysis and visualization, which are the prime features of the software in use, enable us to improve the design and enhance the features of products at the conception and design stage itself. This can be a critical factor for maintaining a competitive edge in the fast growing industry today.

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Assembly Automation, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

John R. Beaton and Timothy G. Clapp

Describes the redesign of the Clupicker, a ply separation device used in the textile industry, based on design for assembly techniques. Presents design for assembly (DFA…

Abstract

Describes the redesign of the Clupicker, a ply separation device used in the textile industry, based on design for assembly techniques. Presents design for assembly (DFA) guidelines. Describes Boothroyd's Systematic DFA Methodology and Zorowski's PDM program, and analyses the design of the Clupicker using both of these methods. Presents and analyses a proposed redesign of the Clupicker based on DFA techniques.

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International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 5 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Carl Wänström and Lars Medbo

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of how the materials feeding design at a workstation impacts the assembly process performance, in terms of…

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2126

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of how the materials feeding design at a workstation impacts the assembly process performance, in terms of manufacturing flexibility, process support, materials planning and work task efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data are based on two embedded case studies performed in close corporation with two Swedish automotive companies; additional observations from more than 20 company visits in Japan, and small‐scale case studies performed in Japanese companies. To fully assess the work measurement figures, video recordings, work instructions and layout drawings were used to plot the operators' walking patterns, and it was then possible to map the whole work cycle for an operator. Industrial engineers, managers, group leaders, team leaders and operators were interviewed. Based on the literature review and personal experience from the small‐scale case studies carried out in Japan, the existing assembly systems' component racks were conceptually re‐designed. This led to two hypothetical assembly systems, which could be used for understanding the impact of materials feeding design on assembly process performance. The design of the new component racks and the choice of packaging types were made together with practitioners.

Findings

The paper shows that the design of component racks and choice of packaging types have a major impact on the assembly process performance. Component racks with a large depth and small width and tailored packages create important advantages over traditional Swedish component racks designed for EUR‐pallets. Line stocking is not always the best choice for materials feeding, but this paper shows that line stocking, especially in Swedish assembly systems, can be improved. Sequencing can thus be reduced, resulting in fewer problems when there are sequence breaks in the production flow. Component racks with small packages and large depth increase the work task efficiency, volume, mix, new products and modification flexibility. For example, free space is an important issue for these types of flexibilities. Component racks that are portable and easy to rearrange, together with free space, greatly facilitate handling of new product introductions or modifications of products. The new and old component can be displayed and fed to the same workstation, and if there is a larger change a whole segment of a component rack can easily be replaced by a new one between work shifts.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the study is limited to the conditions at workstations. Consequences for the materials flow upstream (i.e. internal materials handling, warehousing, transport, supplier processes, etc.) are not included, but must in further studies also be considered to avoid sub‐optimisation.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the fact that a shift in focus is necessary when designing workstations with component racks in Swedish companies, meaning that operators become the customers rather than the transport company or materials handler.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Devdas Shetty and Ahad Ali

The purpose of this paper is to develop a tool design for assembly and disassembly using rating factors. Design engineers need an automated tool to effectively analyze the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a tool design for assembly and disassembly using rating factors. Design engineers need an automated tool to effectively analyze the ease of assembly and disassembly of the products or subassemblies. A good assembly design helps in easier disassembly and thus makes it easier to service, repair and maintain. Reuse and recycling aspects are given importance in the present days due to environmental regulations. Designers now use the life cycle design of the products. This creates an environment for the successful application of design for manufacturing, assembly and disassembly tools. This paper addresses some of those issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis of a product design for ease of assembly/disassembly depends largely on whether the product is to be assembled/disassembled manually, with automation or a combination of these. For example, the criteria for ease of automatic feeding and orienting are much more stringent than those for manual handling of parts. The new design for assembly/disassembly (DFA/DFD) evaluation tool explained here enables the designer to review the existing design. This paper examines the existing techniques in the area of DFA/DFD and suggests a new methodology based on rating factors. Excel is used to create the interface for the user. Other popular methods were examined such as Boothroyd-Dewhurst, Lucas. Access, reuse, removal, tool, task and time method and assembly score method (Poli) were used as a base for this study.

Findings

The end result of this research is a new approach linked to assembly/disassembly rating score.

Originality/value

The new DFA/DFD evaluation tool enables the designer to review the existing DFA and DFD difficulties.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Haixia Wang and Dariusz Ceglarek

Dimensional variation management is a major challenge in multi‐station sheet metal assembly processes involving complex products such as automotive body and aircraft…

Abstract

Purpose

Dimensional variation management is a major challenge in multi‐station sheet metal assembly processes involving complex products such as automotive body and aircraft fuselage assemblies. Very few studies have explored it at a preliminary design phase taking into consideration effects of part deformation on variation propagation, since early design phase involves the development of imprecise design models with scant or incomplete product and process knowledge. The objective of this paper is to present a variation model which can be built into the preliminary design phase taking into consideration all of the existing interactions between flexible parts and tools in multi‐station sheet metal assembly process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper addresses this problem by first, presenting a beam‐based product and process model which shares the same data structure of the B‐Rep CAD models, and therefore can be embedded in CAD systems for automatic product skeletal design; second, determining the influence of part deformation, for various, differing joining and releasing schemes, on variation propagation; and third, utilizing this information to generate a vector‐based variation propagation model for multistation sheet metal assemblies.

Findings

This paper presents a beam‐based product and process model which shares the same data structure of the B‐Rep CAD models, and therefore can be embedded in CAD systems for automatic product skeletal design; determines the influence of part deformation, for various, differing joining and releasing schemes, on variation propagation; and utilizes this information to generate a vector‐based variation propagation model for multistation sheet metal assemblies.

Originality/value

A truck cab assembly is presented to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed model over the state‐of‐the‐art approach used in industry for sheet metal assemblies.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

D.T. Matt

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a design approach based on the investigation of the sensitivity of assembly systems to volume fluctuations as part of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a design approach based on the investigation of the sensitivity of assembly systems to volume fluctuations as part of the selection process of alternative design solutions for scalable assembly systems on the basis of a real industrial case study.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual approach for the (re‐)design of a scalable assembly system is developed on the basis of an industrial case research using axiomatic design (AD) for the top level structuring of the framework incorporating useful methods and insights obtained from a thorough literature review and from previous research work.

Findings

The findings of this research are limited due to the focused nature of a case study based research. However, the obtained results encourage assuming its transferability to similar problems.

Originality/value

Significant research has been done in the design of assembly systems for high product variety, but the review of literature in this field still identifies many opportunities for future research. This paper responds to the clearly identified research need of a methodological guidance regarding the design of scalable assembly systems and offers a practically proven help to improve the efficiency of the design process and the quality of the design results.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Narges Asadi, Mats Jackson and Anders Fundin

The recent shift towards accommodating flexibility in manufacturing companies and the complexity resulting from product variety highlight the significance of flexible…

Abstract

Purpose

The recent shift towards accommodating flexibility in manufacturing companies and the complexity resulting from product variety highlight the significance of flexible assembly systems and designing products for them. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into the requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design from the assembly system’s standpoint.

Design/methodology/approach

To fulfil the purpose of the paper, a literature review and a case study were performed. The case study was conducted with an interactive research approach in a global market leader company within the heavy vehicle manufacturing industry.

Findings

The findings indicate that common assembly sequence, similar assembly interfaces, and common parts are the main requirements of a flexible assembly system for product design which reduce complexity and facilitate various flexibility dimensions. Accordingly, a model is proposed to broaden the understanding of these requirements from the assembly system’s standpoint.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the overlapping research area of flexible assembly systems and product design.

Practical implications

The proposed model is largely based on practical data and clarifies the role of product design in facilitating flexibility in an assembly system. It can be used by assembly managers, assembly engineers, and product designers.

Originality/value

The key originality of this paper compared to the previous studies lies in presenting a novel assembly-oriented design model. The model enhances understanding of a flexible assembly system’s requirements for product design with regard to reducing complexity and managing variation in a flexible assembly system. These requirements can be applied to product design across various product families within a company’s product portfolio.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Anoop Desai

This paper aims to present a design methodology to enable product design for ease of assembly. It is corroborated by means of a case study. The methodology is based on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a design methodology to enable product design for ease of assembly. It is corroborated by means of a case study. The methodology is based on standard time data. This enables quick computation of assembly time as well as comparing different design options for ease of assembly.

Design/methodology/approach

Component design that is easy to assemble is likely to take less time and vice versa. Assembly time is a function of product design attributes such as geometric shape, weight, center of gravity, type of material, number of fasteners and types of fasteners. The methodology uses standard data to achieve its objective. Numeric scores are developed for each design feature based on the aforementioned design attributes. This enables not only computation of assembly time for a brand new product but also comparison of two or more alternative design configurations from the point of view of ease of assembly.

Findings

The value of the system is corroborated by means of case studies of actual product designs. It is demonstrated that changing any of the underlying design attributes (such as type of fastener used, number of fasteners used, material of the component and component shape) is likely to result in changing the amount of time taken to assemble the product. The scoring system facilitates the quick computation of assembly time

Originality/value

The amount of time to assemble a product before the product is ever designed is facilitated by this system. Assembly time is a direct function of product design attributes. Process time is calculated using standard data, specifically, the Methods Time Measurement (MTM) system. This is accomplished by converting design features into time measurement units (TMUs). Assembly cost can then be easily computed by using assembly time as the basis. The computation of assembly time and cost is important inasmuch as its role in influencing productivity. This is of obvious value not only to the designer but the company as a whole.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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