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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Rachel Ivy Clarke and Steven Bell

Purpose – As change creates more uncertainty for library practitioners, graduate library education needs to explore how best to prepare students to manage ambiguity…

Abstract

Purpose – As change creates more uncertainty for library practitioners, graduate library education needs to explore how best to prepare students to manage ambiguity through new approaches to identifying and solving challenging problems. We advocate for incorporating design into graduate library education.

Design/Methodology/Approach – First, we discuss the need for a design approach to librarianship. We then introduce the nature of design thinking and philosophy and discuss the ways in which it is already present in librarianship. We review past developments and recent trends with a special focus on the ways in which design thinking, methods, and philosophies are (or are not) incorporated into library and information science (LIS) education.

Findings – We synthesize these findings to propose recommendations and suggestions for an alternative degree program to the traditional Master of Library Science (MLS): the Master of Library Design (MLD). This includes the presentation of a new model of library education that blends design philosophy with traditional library science content.

Originality/Value – This is the first compilation in the library literature to propose the development of a new type of library degree that we refer to as the MLD; hence, it has a high level of originality. While the library literature has examples of practitioners applying design thinking to improve library services, this chapter’s value is that it promotes the integration of design thinking and philosophy more broadly in order to better equip future library professionals for a rapidly changing information landscape.

Details

Re-envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-880-0

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Salih Ceylan, Pınar Şahin, Serengül Seçmen, Melek Elif Somer and Kemal H. Süher

While the COVID-19 outbreak affects all aspects of life in the world, there is also a global impact in the field of education. Within the scope of the measures to control…

Abstract

Purpose

While the COVID-19 outbreak affects all aspects of life in the world, there is also a global impact in the field of education. Within the scope of the measures to control the epidemic, distance education was started shortly after the starting of the spring semester in all primary and secondary schools and universities. In this process, architectural design courses, which are one of the most fundamental courses of architectural education, started to be held in online studios. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the evaluations of architecture students about the online design studio courses carried out during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a qualitative approach to evaluate the ideas of first, second, third and fourth grade students of architectural design studios in the host university. A questionnaire was directed to students in order to see their opinions about the online design studio education.

Findings

Results shows that students think the most prominent benefit of online studios appears in the use of digital tools. Another important result is that if they are equipped with the necessary tools and given the chance to realize themselves, students can work efficiently even in the distance education process.

Originality/value

This study is important in terms of learning the expectations of students from the online process and to identify important issues that should be considered for the next semesters. In addition, this study will serve as a basis for comparative evaluation of architectural education during and after the epidemic. In this context, the study will shed light on future academic research.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2013

Lisa Domenica Iulo, Christine Gorby, Ute Poerschke, Loukas Nickolas Kalisperis and Malcolm Woollen

This paper aims to examine how US architectural programs are addressing environmental imperatives through curricular‐based initiatives. It offers a brief overview of how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how US architectural programs are addressing environmental imperatives through curricular‐based initiatives. It offers a brief overview of how environmentally conscious design education has evolved and compares curricular approaches to social, aesthetic, and technical sustainability education from six architecture programs considered to be national leaders in sustainability education.

Design/methodology/approach

Views from leading architectural programs on sustainable education were compiled and assessed leading to a curricular study of course and degree offerings.

Findings

It was found that four consistent approaches to undergraduate sustainable design education are being promoted: core value: all course content addresses sustainable design; systems‐focused: support courses fulfill needs for sustainable education; choice: sustainable education is through student selection of courses offerings; and specialization: sustainable education is a specialty endeavor mainly at the graduate level and in concert with centers or institutes. A new “composite” approach to sustainable design education is outlined.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions about architectural curricula were drawn from the assessment of a limited number of representative programs. The findings demonstrate that a technical‐course based approach from the specialist perspective still dominates most architecture programs.

Practical implications

The paper contributes to discourse on sustainability by examining how leading US architectural programs are currently addressing environmental imperatives through curricular‐based initiatives.

Social implications

This paper concludes that a culturally based approach from a generalist perspective which encompasses systems knowledge and interactions among many disciplines is needed in design education.

Originality/value

Beyond architecture, the findings will be useful to many disciplinary domains considering the transition to a stronger, more fully integrated, environmentally focused curriculum.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Sigrid Pauwels, Johan De Walsche and Dra. Lies Declerck

The authors reflect on the academic bachelor and master programs of architecture. From the perspective of higher education policy in Flanders, Belgium, they examine the…

Abstract

The authors reflect on the academic bachelor and master programs of architecture. From the perspective of higher education policy in Flanders, Belgium, they examine the intrinsic challenges of the academic educational setting, and the way architectural education can fit in and benefit from it, without losing its specific design oriented qualities. Therefore, they unravel the process of architectural design research, as a discipline-authentic way of knowledge production, leading to the identification of a number of implicit features of an academic architectural learning environment. The disquisition is based on educational arguments pointed out by literature and theory. Furthermore, the authors analyze whether this learning environment can comply with general standards of external quality assurance and accreditation systems. Doing so, they reveal the Achilles’ heel of architectural education: the incompatibility of the design jury with formalized assessment frameworks. Finally, the authors conclude with an advocacy for academic freedom. To assure the quality of academic architectural programs, it is necessary that universities maintain a critical attitude towards standardized policy frameworks.

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Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Suna Løwe Nielsen and Pia Stovang

In recent years there has been growing focus on the innovative and profit generating value of design thinking in a businesses. This attention is also reflected in business…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years there has been growing focus on the innovative and profit generating value of design thinking in a businesses. This attention is also reflected in business education. The basic thesis is that design thinking is particular relavant to entrepreneurship education. The purpose of this paper is to propose a teaching model, named the DesUni model. The model suggests a novel design-oriented approach to entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper relies on the interfaces between the literatures on entrepreneurship education and design thinking. From reviewing and synthesizing these literatures new insights are offered into how to develop entrepreneurship education through design thinking.

Findings

The DesUni teaching model offers a significant shift in paradigm changing the traditional didactic assumptions of entrepreneurship education. It involves a change in curriculum, teaching methods, use of knowledge, teaching style, teacher-student relations, culture, habitat and assessment.

Originality/value

The DesUni teaching model offers a unique way to form an entrepreneurship curriculum. This curriculum bridges the discovering of the present with what might be in the future along with that students are collaborating with different stakeholders.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 57 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Colleen E. Mills

The purpose of this paper is to address the interface between design education and business start‐up in the designer fashion industry (DFI) and provide a new framework for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the interface between design education and business start‐up in the designer fashion industry (DFI) and provide a new framework for reflecting on ways to improve design education and graduates’ business start‐up preparedness.

Design/methodology/approach

This interpretive study employed semi‐structured interviews to collect nascent fashion designers’ enterprise development narratives and tertiary educators’ views on how they prepare designers for the challenges of the DFI.

Findings

While design and production skills studied in design education are valuable, it was found that work placements are particularly important resources for aspiring fashion business owners because they provide “education in enterprise” and the sort of social capital required for business success. The research produced a framework for reflecting on and refining the fit between design education and the practice of enterprise development in the DFI that incorporates considerations of the creativity‐business tension and designer's enterprise orientations.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest there is a need to create more intersections between fashion design and entrepreneurship education and to incorporate more education for and in enterprise. They also suggest there is value in encouraging students to select design education that fits their enterprise orientation and any skill deficits associated with this orientation.

Originality/value

The paper makes a valuable contribution to both the higher education and entrepreneurship literatures by presenting an original model for conceptualising the way design education can interface with business start‐up to develop industry‐appropriate social capital and sound business practices.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Şule Taşlı Pektaş

After more than four decades of its beginnings, Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) has already reached a level of maturity in both the education and the…

Abstract

After more than four decades of its beginnings, Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) has already reached a level of maturity in both the education and the profession. There is an ever-growing amount of literature on the subject; however, relatively few studies have taken a systematic approach to analyze CAAD education. Moreover, design institutions often view CAAD merely as a technical issue ignoring socio-cultural and theoretical aspects. In order to alleviate these problems, this paper presents a structured analysis of CAAD education based on Prof. Necdet Teymur's theory of architectural education. Prof. Teymur claims that the components of architectural education should be studied in terms of objectives (why), contents (what), methodology (how) and management (who) along with four different knowledge and disciplinary levels (viewpoints); namely, sociological, ideological, epistemological, and pedagogical. In this paper, current issues of CAAD education are addressed within this framework and several proposals are presented.

Details

Open House International, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2012

Holly Buckland Parker

Larger numbers of students are entering higher education with more diverse learning needs. While laws are in place to create equal access to education for all…

Abstract

Larger numbers of students are entering higher education with more diverse learning needs. While laws are in place to create equal access to education for all, government-mandated learning supports for students with documented disabilities vary significantly from K-12 education to higher education. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a course design framework based on Universal Design in architecture, neuroscience research, and the latest technology, to design learning environments and curriculums that are accessible to all students in every learning environment. This chapter reviews literature on the history of Universal Design concepts, starting with Universal Design in architecture and moving into UDL. A review of the learning preferences of Millennial students, along with the neuroscience of learning and its connection to the principles of UDL, is also included in the literature review. This chapter also includes a section on Dr. Buckland Parker's study which documents four faculty members who chose to work with a small team of faculty development specialists to redesign their large enrollment courses using the principles of Universal Design for Learning.

Details

Transforming Learning Environments: Strategies to Shape the Next Generation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-015-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Sezin Tanrıöver, Zeynep Ceylanlı and Pınar Sunar

Architecture as a discipline has gone through a serious change since the post-war period and became a recognized profession focusing on human needs in the physical…

Abstract

Architecture as a discipline has gone through a serious change since the post-war period and became a recognized profession focusing on human needs in the physical environments. The issue of educating new practitioners for the transforming field has turned out to be the subject of a lively debate for the last 10-20 years.

The current position and approach in design studios of Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design of Bahçeşehir University, were thought to be worth putting forth and sharing with the design community to initiate a discussion for the future of the discipline in general. Consequently, this study was structured to present a paradigm in Interior Architecture Education by focusing on the case of Bahçeşehir University (BAU) Interior Architecture and Environmental Design Department design studio education. The four-year program consisting of eight academic semesters, is addressing the combination of two methods; namely, horizontally organized design studios (HODS), and vertically organized studio groups (VODS). Currently, this approach is subject to many discussions within the department due to many aspects. This approach was tested, evaluated and criticized through student and instructor comments collected via questionnaires. Results were collected and interpreted through three main issues of learning, teaching and assessment.

Study moving from general design studio education to the case of Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design of Bahçeşehir University, concludes with general comments, mentioning the lack of literature on design studio education, and the significance of sharing different approaches and applications. Lastly and specifically, the revisions following the completion of the experiment in the department was put forth. With reference to the case of BAU, initiating a discussion regarding current design studio education was intended.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Jason B. Walker and Michael W. Seymour

This paper aims to investigate the design charrette as a method for teaching sustainability.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the design charrette as a method for teaching sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes a student‐based design charrette for the Mississippi Gulf Coast comprising a framework for teaching sustainability. An assessment of the charrette's role in promoting sustainability in higher education was ascertained through respondents completing pre‐ and post‐charrette surveys.

Findings

The paper provides survey results that shed light on the effectiveness of the charrette as an approach for teaching sustainability in higher education.

Research limitations/implications

This research indicates that a charrette framed with criteria for teaching sustainability is viable. However, the study has limitations owing to the project's scope and its being a single‐case sample.

Practical implications

The paper shows that actively engaging students in interdisciplinary, service‐oriented projects is of value in teaching concepts of sustainability in higher education.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the need for sustainability in higher education, focusing on disciplines of design, by assessing the effectiveness of a well‐accepted design teaching approach, the charrette.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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