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Article

Andrew Muirhead, Derek George Ward and Brenda Howard

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a digital tool in an English county striving towards a vision of integrated information that is used to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a digital tool in an English county striving towards a vision of integrated information that is used to underpin an increasingly integrated future of health and social care delivery.

Design/methodology/approach

It discusses the policy context nationally, the origins and implementation of the initiative, the authors’ experiences and viewpoint highlighting key challenges and learning, as well as examples of new work undertaken.

Findings

In all, 12 health and care organisations have participated in this project. The ability for local commissioners and providers of services to now understand “flow” both between and within services at a granular level is unique. Costs are modest, and the opportunities for refining and better targeting as well as validating services are significant, thus demonstrating a return on investment. Key learning includes how organisational development was equally as important as the implementation of innovative new software, that change management from grass roots to strategic leaders is vital, and that the whole system is greater than the sum of its otherwise in-silo parts.

Practical implications

Data linkage initiatives, whether local, regional or national in scale, need to be programme managed. A robust governance and accountability framework must be in place to realise the benefits of such as a solution, and IT infrastructure is paramount.

Social implications

Organisational development, collaborative as well as distributed leadership, and managing a change in culture towards health and care information is critical in order to create a supportive environment that fosters learning across organisational boundaries.

Originality/value

This paper draws on the recent experience of achieving large-scale data integration across the boundaries of health and social care, to help plan and commission services more effectively. This rich, multi-agency intelligence has already begun to change the way in which the system considers service planning, and learning from this county’s approach may assist others considering similar initiatives.

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Article

Derek Ward, Martin Severs and Taraneh Dean

The emergence of the intermediate care agenda has added momentum to the debate on the use of alternative care settings for the delivery of rehabilitative interventions for…

Abstract

The emergence of the intermediate care agenda has added momentum to the debate on the use of alternative care settings for the delivery of rehabilitative interventions for older persons. This paper reports on the findings of the first stage of a research programme to investigate the extent of the use of care home environments for the rehabilitation of older people in England. Stage two of the project will explore in more depth the characteristics of the rehabilitation provision identified in stage one.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article

Derek Ward, Martin Severs and Tara Dean

The continued expansion of the intermediate care initiative has resulted in the use of alternative care settings, such as nursing and care homes, for the delivery of…

Abstract

The continued expansion of the intermediate care initiative has resulted in the use of alternative care settings, such as nursing and care homes, for the delivery of rehabilitative interventions for older people. In this paper, we report on the findings from the second stage of a national survey of rehabilitation schemes that use care home settings. The survey reveals a wide range of approaches and standards, leading us to ask whether there is a gap between policy goals, good practice and actual service provision. The care home rehabilitation schemes were selected on the basis that they offered, as a minimum, rehabilitation to improve an older person's physical status.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

The pattern of food prosecutions in more recent times has remained relatively unchanged. Most have been taken under Section 2, Food and Drugs Act, 1955, even for foods…

Abstract

The pattern of food prosecutions in more recent times has remained relatively unchanged. Most have been taken under Section 2, Food and Drugs Act, 1955, even for foods which have obviously been unfit for human consumption. The Section because of its wider application has distinct procedural advantages. A few local authorities routinely use Section 8 successfully; it probably depends upon a more liberal interpretation and understanding by local justices. The five‐year study of food prosecutions, (BFJ 1971, 73, 39), separated them into a number of well‐defined groups and showed that those for the presence of foreign material were the majority and remained fairly constant throughout the period; mouldy foods increased during the five years and then remained steady as the second largest single group. The foods most commonly affected and the foreign matter commonly present could be seen; neither changed much during the period of the survey.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 74 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part

Anne-Marie Gingras

Purpose: This chapter examines how two basic rights, freedom of expression, and the right to equality based on one’s dignity, reputation, and honor, were balanced in a…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter examines how two basic rights, freedom of expression, and the right to equality based on one’s dignity, reputation, and honor, were balanced in a case involving a stand-up comedian and an adolescent suffering from Treacher Collins syndrome. Methodology/Approach: The case is contrasted with Jürgen Habermas’ concept of the public sphere and with the intrinsic and utilitarian values that Canadian courts have attributed to free speech. Findings: Because the case was dealt with first in a human rights tribunal and then by a court of appeal, a number of considerations were overlooked in court proceedings: how laughter occurs; the broadening of Ward’s audience and its consequences; and Ward’s publicity strategy. These aspects are explored here to give a more complete picture of the case beyond the court decisions. Originality/Value: In Canada, freedom of expression is usually dealt with ordinary courts. A whole new avenue for dealing with this right is human rights bodies and tribunals. Contesting free speech in the name of defamation is being replaced by rights entrenched in human rights charters, such as the right to equality based on the preservation of one’s dignity, reputation, and honor.

Details

Media and Law: Between Free Speech and Censorship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-729-9

Keywords

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Article

Hannah Merdian, Danielle Kettleborough, Kieran McCartan and Derek E. Perkins

Increasing numbers of convictions for the use of child sexual exploitation material (CSEM) call for enhanced measures to prevent this type of offending. Strength-based…

Abstract

Purpose

Increasing numbers of convictions for the use of child sexual exploitation material (CSEM) call for enhanced measures to prevent this type of offending. Strength-based approaches such as the good lives model have made significant contributions to the management of offenders who have sexually abused against children. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study explored the application of these models to the rehabilitation and desistance behaviour of CSEM users, based on a thematic analysis of the self-managed desistance strategies employed by 26 offenders.

Findings

The findings confirmed the value of strength-based approaches in understanding self-management strategies used to enhance desistance behaviour in CSEM users.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical and theoretical findings were then combined into a conceptual framework aimed to enhance preventative efforts and interventions targeted at undetected CSEM users.

Originality/value

This paper provides the first conceptual and empirical model of prevention and desistance behaviour specific to CSEM offending.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

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Article

Derek Miles

The growing worldwide emphasis on decentralized private sector provision of infrastructure projects and urban services in developing countries has been reflected in a need…

Abstract

The growing worldwide emphasis on decentralized private sector provision of infrastructure projects and urban services in developing countries has been reflected in a need to deliver training and other assistance to large numbers of nascent small enterprises. However, the target group is hard to identify and harder still to reach, being dispersed over a variety of business activities in various sub‐sectors, and based in a range of countries with their own cultures and traditions. Thus the trainer is faced with a dilemma. Some aspects of small enterprise development are common and widely replicable, which means that expenditure on developing high quality material and systems could be spread over numerous technical co‐operation projects, but others are both sector and culture specific. Describes experience which points to the advantages of internationally applicable programmes and systems which can be supplemented with locally‐based material to meet the special needs of particular sectors and national cultures. If the people cannot adapt themselves to the methods, then the methods must be adapted to the people. This is the whole crux of the matter. (Schumacher, 1974).

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article

Derek Tobin and Debbie Boulton

Acute inpatient ward staff work with service users who have comorbid mental health and substance misuse problems (dual diagnosis) on a daily basis. Department of Health…

Abstract

Acute inpatient ward staff work with service users who have comorbid mental health and substance misuse problems (dual diagnosis) on a daily basis. Department of Health (DH) guidance for working with this group (DH, 2002; DH, 2006) indicates that training is needed to equip staff with the confidence and skills for this work. This paper describes how the COMPASS Programme, Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health Foundation Trust's (BSMHT) dual diagnosis service, developed, delivered and evaluated a training programme designed to support inpatient staff in this work.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Article

Patricia Ball, Maureen Spinetto and Derek Beeston

The practical approach to quality assurance taken at the Mental Health Foundation (Mid‐Staffordshire) is described. It emphasises an approach which could be understood by…

Abstract

The practical approach to quality assurance taken at the Mental Health Foundation (Mid‐Staffordshire) is described. It emphasises an approach which could be understood by everyone and sets out the key factors in its success. Focusing on the systems and the culture developed within the unit, it demonstrates how to get the balance right.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Book part

D. A. Hutchinson and C. L. Clarke

In this chapter, we inquire into our ever-unfolding experiences as teachers and with teacher research participants in order to explore the complexities of curriculum…

Abstract

In this chapter, we inquire into our ever-unfolding experiences as teachers and with teacher research participants in order to explore the complexities of curriculum making in teacher education. In doing so, we lay the foundation for understanding narrative inquiry as both theory and method as such, frame our work in this volume. Curriculum making, a term introduced by Joseph Schwab, reflects the dynamic process of learning in which the teacher, learner, subject matter, and milieu interact. Moreover, we think about the ways people make sense of themselves, identity-making, in the process of curriculum making. Through Derek’s experiences with Lee, a previous Grade five student, and Cindy’s work with Jesse, a research participant, we inquire into their curriculum making and identity-making. We argue that in schools, there are multiple curricula in the making, going beyond the formal notions of curriculum as grade-level standards or classroom objectives. In our inquiry process, we consider experiences in schools through Aoki’s understanding of curriculum-as-plan and lived curriculum. In his writing, Aoki noted that the lived experience of curriculum in schools is much more complex and varied than the planned curriculum that is meant for a generalized audience; students and teachers bring their lives with them into particular contexts that indelibly shape the ways that curriculum is lived out. As well, we think about the ways experiences and places shape teachers and researchers and the ways we see the world.

Details

Landscapes, Edges, and Identity-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-598-1

Keywords

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