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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Derek Farr and John McKenzie

As part of the 1989 Market Research Week initiative to promote the “Your Opinion Counts” campaign, a number of the leading Telephone Research agencies volunteered to…

Abstract

As part of the 1989 Market Research Week initiative to promote the “Your Opinion Counts” campaign, a number of the leading Telephone Research agencies volunteered to undertake a telephone research study amongst consumers nationwide. The principle objective of the study was to provide useful information for promotion purposes, covering the views of people in Britain about the major issues confronting our people today, and their opinion of the sort of place they think the world will be in 1999.

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Management Research News, vol. 14 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Derek Milne, Seirian Hanner, Katy Woodward and Colin Westerman

It is now recognised that therapists require career‐long training in order to maintain and improve their expertise. However, training will fail to improve services to…

Abstract

It is now recognised that therapists require career‐long training in order to maintain and improve their expertise. However, training will fail to improve services to clients unless the work environment supports staff in its use. Although this “training transfer” problem is widely acknowledged, to the authors' knowledge the way that the work environment influences clients' access to effective therapies has not been subjected to a detailed and systematic formulation. Therefore, this small study illustrates a suitable formulation, based on the training received by a group of National Health Service (NHS) staff in “psychosocial interventions”, and proposes its use as a “feedback fascia” to managers and others. To do this, structured interviews were held with a self‐selected sample of n=20 therapists (mostly nurses) and all of their managers (n=11) in one NHS Trust. The results indicated an impressive degree of training transfer. It is concluded that staff training can improve clients' access to effective treatments, but that significant organisational support for innovation is required. A feedback fascia can guide such support.

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Tom Pettinger

Purpose – The author investigates how those who have engaged in political violence in the UK understand Prevent’s preemptive rationality, and how Prevent conceptualizes…

Abstract

Purpose – The author investigates how those who have engaged in political violence in the UK understand Prevent’s preemptive rationality, and how Prevent conceptualizes the trajectory toward “terrorism” in relation to the testimony of those who have engaged in “terrorist” violence and were convicted of terrorism offences.

Methodology/Approach – The author takes the assumptions that Prevent makes about risk (from the Prevent Strategy and other documents), and tests these against the testimony of former combatants from “the Troubles.”

Findings – Despite the trajectory toward violence not being considered to differ fundamentally nor demonstrated through evidence to operate differently from one era to the next, the premise of Prevent’s assumptions of the movement into violence and former combatant testimony are entirely foreign to each other.

Originality/Value – Although militants from “the Troubles” (a conflict ending in 1998) and Prevent (established in 2003) are speaking about the same country and narrating their “truth” within five years of each other, the differences in how former combatants and Prevent understand the trajectory toward violence have not been considered. This has remained a significant omission of terrorism scholarship.

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Radicalization and Counter-Radicalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-988-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Alison Macfarlane

I work at the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit which is a Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) funded multidisciplinary research unit. We have a strong view…

Abstract

I work at the National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit which is a Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) funded multidisciplinary research unit. We have a strong view that before collecting new data we should use the data which already exist. As a result, both our economist and I make very extensive use of official statistics.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1975

At the passing of the Fair Trading Act, 1973, and the setting up of a Consumer Protection Service with an Office of Fair Trading under a Director‐General, few could have…

Abstract

At the passing of the Fair Trading Act, 1973, and the setting up of a Consumer Protection Service with an Office of Fair Trading under a Director‐General, few could have visualized this comprehensive machinery devised to protect the mainly economic interests of consumers could be used to further the efforts of local enforcement officers and authorities in the field of purity and quality control of food and of food hygiene in particular. This, however, is precisely the effect of a recent initiative under Sect. 34 of the Act, reported elsewhere in the BFJ, taken by the Director‐General in securing from a company operating a large group of restaurants a written undertaking, as prescribed by the Section, that it would improve its standards of hygiene; the company had ten convictions for hygiene contraventions over a period of six years.

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British Food Journal, vol. 77 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1974

EVER since those far‐off days when life was represented on this planet by nothing except a few primitive protoplasts gliding in a quiet pool, the earth has been subject to…

Abstract

EVER since those far‐off days when life was represented on this planet by nothing except a few primitive protoplasts gliding in a quiet pool, the earth has been subject to changes. Some have been as transient and unimportant as a French fashion while others endured as vast orientations of man's way of living.

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Work Study, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Sophie Dennard, Derek K. Tracy, Aaron Beeney, Laura Craster, Fiona Bailey, Anisah Baureek, Michael Barton, Jeanette Turrell, Sarah Poynton, Vafo Navkarov and Radha Kothari

Prisons are uniquely challenging working environments. Staff are often exposed to direct and indirect trauma, impacting negatively on their mental well-being. Due to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Prisons are uniquely challenging working environments. Staff are often exposed to direct and indirect trauma, impacting negatively on their mental well-being. Due to the limited research into prison staff experience, this paper aims to explore what staff find most challenging, how they cope, what support they would like and rewarding aspects of their work.

Design/methodology/approach

This service development project was facilitated through a staff well-being event. A qualitative approach was used and 74 staff members provided anonymised responses. An inductive and data-driven approach was used to analyse the data, and the trustworthiness of the analysis was considered using criteria established by Lincoln and Guba (1985).

Findings

Thematic analysis identified six themes, namely, the challenging nature of the work, interactions with prisoners, staff interactions, inadequate resources, staff support and development and coping strategies. Key findings include managing distress, self-harm and violence and limited resources presenting challenges. Role variety and opportunities to support prisoners were reported as positive. A variety of coping strategies were identified. Wider availability of supervision and reflective practice was suggested by staff.

Practical implications

Recommendations for increased staff support are made. Suggestions for future research investigating methods to increase rewarding aspects of work within prisons are given.

Originality/value

This analysis adds to the limited body of qualitative research investigating prison staff experiences; in particular, aspects of the work that they find rewarding such as the role variety and opportunities to make positive changes to prisoners’ lives. Novel coping strategies were identified, including cognitive reframing and behavioural strategies for managing stress, which could be encouraged to increase resilience.

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The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1979

It tends to be called the corner shop, mainly because it occupied a corner building for extra window space, but also due to the impetus given to the name by television…

Abstract

It tends to be called the corner shop, mainly because it occupied a corner building for extra window space, but also due to the impetus given to the name by television series seeking to portray life as it used to be. The village grew from the land, a permanent stopping place for the wandering tribes of early Britain, the Saxons, Welsh, Angles; it furnished the needs of those forming it and eventually a village store or shop was one of those needs. Where the needs have remained unchanged, the village is much as it has always been, a historical portrait. The town grew out of the village, sometimes a conglomerate of several adjacent villages. In the days before cheap transport, the corner shop, in euphoric business terms, would be described as “a little gold mine”, able to hold its own against the first introduction of multiple chain stores, but after 1914 everything changed. Edwardian England was blasted out of existence by the holocaust of 1914–18, destroyed beyond all hope of recovery. The patterns of retail trading changed and have been continuously changing ever since. A highly developed system of cheap bus transport took village housewives and also those in the outlying parts of town into busy central shopping streets. The jaunt of the week for the village wife who saw little during the working days; the corner shop remained mainly for things they had “run out of”. Every village had its “uppety” madames however who affected disdain of the corner shop and its proprietors, preferring to swish their skirts in more fashionable emporia, basking in the obsequious reception by the proprietor and his equally servile staff.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 81 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1936

AT intervals the rules and regulations of libraries should be scrutinized. They are not in themselves sacrosanct as is the constitution of the Realm, but many exist which…

Abstract

AT intervals the rules and regulations of libraries should be scrutinized. They are not in themselves sacrosanct as is the constitution of the Realm, but many exist which no longer have serviceable qualities. Nevertheless, so long as a rule remains in force it should be operative and its application be general and impartial amongst readers; otherwise, favouritism and other ills will be charged against the library that makes variations. This being so, it is imperative that now and then revision should take place. There is to‐day a great dislike of discipline, which leads to attacks on all rules, but a few rules are necessary in order that books may be made to give the fullest service, be preserved as far as that is compatible with real use, and that equality of opportunity shall be given to all readers. What is wanted is not “no rules at all,” but good ones so constructed that they adapt themselves to the needs of readers. Anachronisms such as: the rule that in lending libraries forbids the exchange of a book on the day it is borrowed; the illegal charge for vouchers; insistence that readers shall return books for renewal; the rigid limiting of the number of readers' tickets; or a procrustean period of loan for books irrespective of their character—here are some which have gone in many places and should go in all. Our point, however, is that rules should be altered by the authority, not that the application of rules should be altered by staffs. The latter is sometimes done, and trouble usually ensues.

Details

New Library World, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

R.E. Bell

Over the last two decades in particular, national legislatures have passed legislation aimed at ensuring that criminals do not profit from crime. This has been in response…

Abstract

Over the last two decades in particular, national legislatures have passed legislation aimed at ensuring that criminals do not profit from crime. This has been in response to the rise of organised crime and to the massive amounts of money being generated, in particular, by drug trafficking. It has been an attempt to destroy ‘the heart of the monster, its financial base’. This paper seeks to demonstrate that the proceeds of crime response by national governments can be perceived as evolving through a series of different models, thus allowing a comparative approach amongst different jurisdictions. Each model is composed of elements from three different strands: money‐laundering legislation, confiscation legislation and organisational structures and arrangements. These strands have each gone through their own evolution, which will now be examined.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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