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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2021

Redvin Bilu, Faizah Darus, Haslinda Yusoff and Intan Salwani Mohamed

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of environmental offences committed in Malaysia charged under the Environmental Quality Act 1974 (EQA1974).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of environmental offences committed in Malaysia charged under the Environmental Quality Act 1974 (EQA1974).

Design/methodology/approach

This study used secondary data of the environmental court cases report by the Department of Environment (DOE) Malaysia from 2008 until 2016 to examine the nature of environmental offences based on the Treadmill of Production (ToP) approach.

Findings

In comparison with the GDP growth (Department of Statistic Malaysia, 2016), the findings support ToP argument that as far as the treadmill accelerates, the more would be the environmental crime committed. However, all offences charged were weighted more on the ecological additions rather than ecological withdrawn. The trend analysis showed a decreasing trend for all types of offences committed, reflecting that Malaysia's regulatory authorities are committed to fighting against environmental crime perpetrators. Therefore, all parties must be made to internalise the values of conducting business sustainably.

Originality/value

This paper is the first that examines the environmental offences committed in Malaysia using the ToP approach to analyse the nature of the crime committed in Malaysia associated with the growing literature of Green Criminology.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Abstract

Details

Improving Flood Management, Prediction and Monitoring
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-552-4

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Dayana Jalaludin, Maliah Sulaiman and Nik Nazli Nik Ahmad

The purpose of this research paper is to report the results of a study that explains the relationship between institutional pressure and environmental management…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to report the results of a study that explains the relationship between institutional pressure and environmental management accounting (EMA) adoption. Specifically, it looks at the pressure of government and other parties in society concerning EMA adoption among manufacturing companies in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the new institutional sociology theory, the paper seeks to identify the extent to which institutional pressure influences EMA adoption level. A total of 74 accountants from manufacturing companies in Malaysia participated in the survey. Institutional pressure (coercive isomorphism, normative pressure and mimetic processes) was tested against the level of EMA adoption via multiple regression analysis. Next, semi‐structured interviews were employed with four survey participants to gain further insights into the survey results.

Findings

The findings of this study reveal some influence of institutional pressure on EMA adoption. Of these, normative pressure in terms of training and accounting body membership was found to be the most forceful.

Practical implications

Recognising the important role of accountants in managing environmental issues in organisations, this study highlights the influence of education and training as determinants of EMA adoption.

Originality/value

This paper offers a preliminary understanding from the new institutional sociology perspective concerning the type of pressure that influences manufacturing companies in Malaysia to adopt EMA.

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2014

Zalina Shari and Veronica Soebarto

Economically, Malaysia has one of the fastest growing construction industries in the world; however, the necessary balance between socio-economic and ecological systems …

2193

Abstract

Purpose

Economically, Malaysia has one of the fastest growing construction industries in the world; however, the necessary balance between socio-economic and ecological systems – to avoid further environmental damage – has not yet been reached by the industry. This paper aims to explore the extent of sustainable development practices (socially, environmentally and economically) in the Malaysian construction industry, focusing on the office building sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured in-depth interviews with 30 stakeholders from various backgrounds of the Malaysian construction industry are used to explore their challenges and motivations for pursuing sustainable outcomes.

Findings

The study finds that economic issues are the first priorities among stakeholders in any decision-makings for building projects and cost becomes one of the major reasons for the slow progress in implementing sustainable practices in building projects. Socially, there is still a wide gap of knowledge and awareness on sustainability issues among stakeholders, explaining the lack of commitment in achieving sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is only adequate to enable internal generalisation; hence, further research is required to test the generalisability of the findings in this research.

Practical implications

This paper informs the government and regulatory stakeholders, research and education sector, private sector, and clients of the building industry, where the authors currently are and the gaps that the authors have to bridge in order to make sustainability more socially acceptable and integral in the local construction industry.

Originality/value

There have been very limited studies on exploring the views from various groups of stakeholders regarding all the three components of sustainable development in the Malaysian construction industry.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Ngai Weng Chan

Malaysia is an ex‐colonial, newly‐industrialising country, with a sustained high economic growth rate averaging eight per cent GDP per annum over the past ten years…

6443

Abstract

Malaysia is an ex‐colonial, newly‐industrialising country, with a sustained high economic growth rate averaging eight per cent GDP per annum over the past ten years. Within such a rapidly booming economy, the pace of social, economic and political change is fast, as is the pace of technological change. Other things being equal, these are the changes in which environmental hazards can be magnified. As a result of rapid economic development, physical systems are disturbed and changed. For example, the modification of the hydrological cycle due to deforestation, urbanisation, development of hill slopes and other human land use have given rise to increased risks of landslides. In recent years, the collapse of a block of luxury condominiums in Kuala Lumpur, the Genting Highland and Pos Dipang landslide tragedies as well as other landslide disasters have caused substantial loss of life and damage to property and infrastructure. Combined with intensive development of hill slopes and hill land for housing, recreation, tourism, agriculture, highway and dam construction, and other human induced land use changes, the exposure and vulnerability of human populations to landslide hazards have also increased. Other reasons, largely structural, such as persistent poverty, low residential and occupational mobility, and landlessness, manifested in illegal squatting and farming on hill slopes and foothills have also contributed to increased vulnerability of large communities to landslide hazards in many parts of the country. As Malaysia pushes ahead to meet its target of becoming a fully industrialised country by the year 2020, further environmental degradation is expected to occur. Notwithstanding other aspects of environmental degradation, the occurrence of landslide hazards is expected to become a common feature of Malaysian life.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 November 2010

A.M. Leman, M.Z.M. Yusof, A.R. Omar and W. Jung

The purpose of this paper is to define an environmental quality index (EQI) for a clean manufacturing process. The categorized clean and sustainable manufacturing process…

2623

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define an environmental quality index (EQI) for a clean manufacturing process. The categorized clean and sustainable manufacturing process in a small and medium enterprise, and the indoor air quality (IAQ) parameter and air pollution in manufacturing were monitored and evaluated using the EQI index.

Design/methodology/approach

Two main methods of measurements used are subjective measurements and physical measurements. Questionnaires were used to gauge subjects' level of understanding in issues related to IAQ and to determine types of activities, process and material involved in each working section. Physical measurements and testing methods employed were based on widely used and accepted scientific practice, as described in standards. The Malaysian code of practice on IAQ was also used as a reference.

Findings

The EQI in various workstations were calculated and ranged between four and 16 (i.e. four to 16, from good to unhealthy) depending on the nature of activities taking place in those work stations.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper, the monitoring of pollutants used a scale of one to five to denote the level of pollution by individual pollutants and assumed those pollutants are additive in the mixture of the EQI. The working environment is important to productivity and has a direct impact on human health.

Originality/value

The paper shows how the EQI will have a significant impact on occupational safety and health in the workplace and how an uncondusive work environment will be a potential health hazard and result in less productivity.

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Mohamad Mahathir Amir Sultan, Choo Ta Goh, Sharifa Ezat Wan Puteh and Mazlin Mokhtar

Mercury is widely used in medical and healthcare facilities as dental amalgam, mercury-added medical devices, thiomersal-containing vaccines, laboratory analysis and for…

Abstract

Purpose

Mercury is widely used in medical and healthcare facilities as dental amalgam, mercury-added medical devices, thiomersal-containing vaccines, laboratory analysis and for other general applications despite the hazards. Various agencies consistently promote mercury-free medical facilities through mercury-free alternatives and better management practices, which are in line with the Minamata Convention on Mercury that aims to protect human health and environment from anthropogenic mercury release. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a gap analysis on recommended practices gathered from the literature and current practices gathered through semi-structured interviews with Malaysian medical personnel. A life cycle approach was adopted covering mercury use: input, storage, handling, accident, waste disposal and governance phases.

Findings

The authors found that there are significant gaps between recommended and current mercury management practices. Analysis indicates improper mercury management as the main contributor to these gaps. The authors found from recommended practices that core components needing improvement include: mercury management action plan, mercury use identification team, purchasing policy, proper guidelines and monitoring systems.

Practical implications

This study helps us to understand mercury management practices and suggests essential steps to establish a mercury-free medical facility.

Originality/value

This study explored the gaps between recommended and current mercury management practices in a medical facility and contributes to the Minamata Convention on Mercury aspirations.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Haslinda Yusoff and Glen Lehman

The purpose of this paper is to understand the motives behind corporate environmental reporting in Malaysia and Australia from an alternative perspective, i.e. through semiotics.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the motives behind corporate environmental reporting in Malaysia and Australia from an alternative perspective, i.e. through semiotics.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews are made on the annual reports of the top 50 public companies in both countries, and the uses of business languages in those reports are investigated. The research concentrates on the significations of environmental messages made through paradigmatic and syntagmatic tests.

Findings

Corporate environmental disclosures made by the public companies in Malaysia and Australia signify similar form of motives. The tones, orientations, and patterns of environmental disclosures indicate that environmental information is a strategic mechanism used towards enhancing good corporate reputation.

Research limitations/implications

Environmental reporting plays a significant role in promoting corporate “green” image in conjunction with the aims for better social integration.

Practical implications

Semiotics offers a useful basis that enables a greater understanding of why companies prepare and disclose environmental information. Such an understanding holds the potential to provide ideas and guide policy‐makers, and other stakeholders (and users) of corporate environmental information.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to comparatively investigate the corporate motives and intention of environmental reporting practices via the application of semiotics on a two‐country data, specifically Malaysia and Australia.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Yap Wing Fen and W. Mahmood Mat Yunus

The purpose of this paper is to review the novel application of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in sensing heavy metal ions and the development of SPR to become an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the novel application of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in sensing heavy metal ions and the development of SPR to become an alternative heavy metal ions sensor.

Design/methodology/approach

The possible dangerous toxic effects of heavy metal ions are revealed in the short introduction. The existing conventional methods for sensing heavy metal ions and their drawbacks are also discussed. To overcome these drawbacks, SPR has been investigated from the basic principle to the potential alternative in sensing heavy metal ions.

Findings

Application of SPR in sensing heavy metal ions emerged a decade ago. A wide range of active layers or recognition elements (e.g. polymer, protein, nanoparticles) have been developed to combine with SPR. The detection limit, sensitivity and selectivity of SPR sensing in heavy metal ions have been improved from time to time, until the present.

Originality/value

This paper provides up-to-date and systematic information on SPR sensing for heavy metal ions. Different advancements on active layers or recognition molecules have been discussed in detail and arranged in the order of their chronological evolution. The present review may provide researchers with valuable information regarding novel heavy metal ions sensor using SPR and encourage them to take this area for further research and development.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2015

Azizah Ahmad

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive…

Abstract

The strategic management literature emphasizes the concept of business intelligence (BI) as an essential competitive tool. Yet the sustainability of the firms’ competitive advantage provided by BI capability is not well researched. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for successful BI deployment and empirically examines the association between BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage. Taking the telecommunications industry in Malaysia as a case example, the research particularly focuses on the influencing perceptions held by telecommunications decision makers and executives on factors that impact successful BI deployment. The research further investigates the relationship between successful BI deployment and sustainable competitive advantage of the telecommunications organizations. Another important aim of this study is to determine the effect of moderating factors such as organization culture, business strategy, and use of BI tools on BI deployment and the sustainability of firm’s competitive advantage.

This research uses combination of resource-based theory and diffusion of innovation (DOI) theory to examine BI success and its relationship with firm’s sustainability. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and a two-phase sequential mixed method consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches are employed. A tentative research model is developed first based on extensive literature review. The chapter presents a qualitative field study to fine tune the initial research model. Findings from the qualitative method are also used to develop measures and instruments for the next phase of quantitative method. The study includes a survey study with sample of business analysts and decision makers in telecommunications firms and is analyzed by partial least square-based structural equation modeling.

The findings reveal that some internal resources of the organizations such as BI governance and the perceptions of BI’s characteristics influence the successful deployment of BI. Organizations that practice good BI governance with strong moral and financial support from upper management have an opportunity to realize the dream of having successful BI initiatives in place. The scope of BI governance includes providing sufficient support and commitment in BI funding and implementation, laying out proper BI infrastructure and staffing and establishing a corporate-wide policy and procedures regarding BI. The perceptions about the characteristics of BI such as its relative advantage, complexity, compatibility, and observability are also significant in ensuring BI success. The most important results of this study indicated that with BI successfully deployed, executives would use the knowledge provided for their necessary actions in sustaining the organizations’ competitive advantage in terms of economics, social, and environmental issues.

This study contributes significantly to the existing literature that will assist future BI researchers especially in achieving sustainable competitive advantage. In particular, the model will help practitioners to consider the resources that they are likely to consider when deploying BI. Finally, the applications of this study can be extended through further adaptation in other industries and various geographic contexts.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-764-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 17000