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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Dana W.R. Boden

The purpose of this study was to determine not-yet-tenured university library faculty members’ views of 27 methods their department chair may use to support and enhance…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine not-yet-tenured university library faculty members’ views of 27 methods their department chair may use to support and enhance the faculty member's professional development. The methods were derived from earlier qualitative research on department chairs in higher education. While academic teaching department chair roles have been the subject of the research literature for many years, little research has addressed library faculty perceptions of the department chair's role. The survey instrument used consisted of two parts: (1) a demographics section, consisting of five questions; and (2) a researcher-developed survey of faculty perceptions of the department chairs’ role in faculty development. Survey participants were asked to rate the importance of methods chairs may use in enhancing the professional activities of faculty. According to the not-yet-tenured library faculty members responding to this study, a chair engaging in the most important practices to enhance their faculty's professional development would be one who utilizes good communication, while acting as an administrative advocate.

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Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1410-2

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2014

Anthony H. Normore and Jeffrey S. Brooks

Leadership and management are concepts regularly used in organizational change and reform literature. This is particularly evident in educational settings and oftentimes…

Abstract

Leadership and management are concepts regularly used in organizational change and reform literature. This is particularly evident in educational settings and oftentimes understood as interchangeable. The school administrator is considered a leadership position, as is department chair in an institution of higher education. Yet, most are engaged daily in management tasks with little to no time spent on leadership (Bush, 2008). In higher education, the complex role of department chair necessitates a multi-task oriented individual (Hecht, Higgerson, Gmelch, & Tucker, 1999) who can both serve and coordinate multiple constituencies and ultimately balance the role of chair with the continuing roles of teacher and scholar. Although they are pulled in many directions there may be no more important leadership position in the institution for those interested in affecting the future of young people as well as their colleagues. In this chapter we discuss the commonalities and differences between leadership and management across the PreK-16 continuum; present the general roles and responsibilities of school-based administrators and university-level department chairs, and; compare leadership readiness and transition processes of school-based and university-level department chairs. Implications for theory and practice are presented.

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Pathways to Excellence: Developing and Cultivating Leaders for the Classroom and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-116-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Walter H. Gmelch and John S. Burns

Seeks to answer the following research questions: What job dimensionsare perceived as stressful by department chairs? To what degree dochairs exhibit stress from their…

Abstract

Seeks to answer the following research questions: What job dimensions are perceived as stressful by department chairs? To what degree do chairs exhibit stress from their dual faculty and administrator roles? What influence does academic discipline have on chair stress? and What influence do personal attributes have on chair stress? Over 800 department chairs, stratified by discipline, were selected from research and doctorate granting institutions and completed the Department Chair Stress Index along with demographic questions. A response rate of 70.2 per cent was achieved. The results of the study indicate that, overall, stress among department chairs appears to be monolithic in its effect. Also chairs expressed high stress both in faculty and in administrative areas of concern.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Joyce Yen, Eve A. Riskin, Cara Margherio, Jan H. Spyridakis, Coleen M. Carrigan and Ana Mari Cauce

The advancement of equity, diversity and inclusion in higher education is dependent on institutional culture changes in academia. Faculty equity, diversity and inclusion…

Abstract

Purpose

The advancement of equity, diversity and inclusion in higher education is dependent on institutional culture changes in academia. Faculty equity, diversity and inclusion efforts must engage departmental leadership. The purpose of this paper is to describe the growth and expansion of the ADVANCE leadership program at the University of Washington (UW) for department chairs that was designed to provide department chairs the skills, community and information needed to be agents of change within the academy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper chronicles the program’s growth from a campus-based workshop program to national workshops (LEAD) to a web-based toolkit (LiY!) to support institutions in running their own UW ADVANCE-inspired leadership workshops.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the success of each growth stage and the expansion of program impact.

Practical implications

The paper offers recommendations for growing a model from a local to national scale and adapting the described leadership development model at other institutions.

Originality/value

The paper shares a successful model for equipping department chairs to be advocates of gender equity, diversity and inclusion in STEM and to be change agents in higher education.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Thomas G. Noland, Shawn Mauldin and Robert L. Braun

The purpose of this study is twofold. The first purpose is to inform faculty who are thinking of becoming a department head about the challenges they face if they choose…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is twofold. The first purpose is to inform faculty who are thinking of becoming a department head about the challenges they face if they choose to pursue a department head opportunity. The second purpose is to provide insight into the leadership of the accounting departments by looking at various workload aspects of department heads. The authors surveyed accounting department heads from programs with the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accounting accreditation, AACSB business only accreditation, and non-AACSB accreditation. Surveys were sent to 918 individuals listed as the leader of an accounting program in the 2016–2017 Hasselback Accounting Directory with 144 individuals responding (15.7% response rate). In addition to the workload of the department head in the areas of teaching, research, and service, the study analyzed the major challenges and difficulties the department head faces. The study also sought responses from survey participants on additional issues such as the benefits of AACSB accreditation and compensation.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 October 2014

Amy S. Wharton and Mychel Estevez

We examine chairs’ beliefs about the role of gender and gender inequality in their departments. Because work-family concerns have been central to explanations of gender…

Abstract

Purpose

We examine chairs’ beliefs about the role of gender and gender inequality in their departments. Because work-family concerns have been central to explanations of gender inequality in the academy, we pay special attention to these issues.

Methodology/approach

We analyze interview data collected from 52 department chairs at one research-intensive, public university.

Findings

Although the chairs we interviewed were sympathetic and aware in many respects, their views on gender, work, and family were filtered through the lens of personal responsibility and choice, an outmoded view of work as separate and distinct from family life, and a notion of gender as a personal characteristic rather than an entrenched feature of academic work and careers.

Originality/value

Our focus on departmental leaders fills an important gap in the literature, which has focused more on the perspectives of faculty and less on those with the power to frame gender issues.

Details

Gender Transformation in the Academy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-070-4

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Moldir Yelibay

The study explores factors affecting workplace–mentoring relationships of young female faculty members and their department chairs.

Abstract

Purpose

The study explores factors affecting workplace–mentoring relationships of young female faculty members and their department chairs.

Design/methodology/approach

The author used a qualitative interview research design to answer the research questions of the study. Semi-structured interviews of ten female faculty members from Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan were analyzed with the help of thematic coding and its interpretation.

Findings

The study suggests implementing women-only formal mentorship programs with Kochan's (2013) cultural framework for an organizational culture change. The reason is that study provides some insights into the traditional values that underpin age and gender biases in the professional community of Kazakhstani academia. However, but the results differ for participants who are informally mentored by department chairs with modern values. The author acknowledges that the small sample limits the findings and it's interpretation. Hence more research in the interdisciplinary field of gender, education and workforce in the context is required.

Originality/value

The study presents new evidence to support existing Western research on factors influencing workplace relationships and mentorship for young female faculty members. This empirical research adds on findings to the existing data from the Central Asian context, particularly to the sector of women studies and organizational culture in higher education institutions.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2017

Carl J. Couch

Abstract

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Carl J. Couch and The Iowa School
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-166-9

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Terence M. Hancock

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to analyze traditional duties of academic administrators in light of fundamental changes in the ways universities operate…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to analyze traditional duties of academic administrators in light of fundamental changes in the ways universities operate, increasing demands in teaching, research and costs management, and a looming shortage of qualified faculty, to determine need and opportunity for a better administrative design. Design/methodology/approach – Survey, interview and budget data are collected across a major public university. Findings – Across seven categories of chair duties, 71.3 percent of time demands, more than 3.5 of 5 days in a typical week, involve general managerial tasks that require no discipline‐specific academic credentials. Costs of performing these tasks, both in the way of lost productivity and extra pay, are compiled. Research limitations/implications – While the personal and institutional costs of placing senior faculty in managerial roles has been well‐discussed, prior research has not been directed toward quantifying those costs to suggest remedy. Practical implications – Delegating appropriate duties to committee and non‐academic staff could free senior faculty in leadership roles to remain fully active in teaching and research, the productive work of colleges they're highly trained and most needed to do. Originality/value – This paper builds foundations for restructuring academic leadership more in tune with current realities within higher education so senior faculty are not consumed with duties more efficiently done other ways.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2017

Carl J. Couch

Abstract

Details

Carl J. Couch and The Iowa School
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-166-9

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