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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2007

Rosemary Stockdale and Sven Kühne

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the growing body of research into virtual teams by using empirical data to validate existing theory. It analyses a project in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the growing body of research into virtual teams by using empirical data to validate existing theory. It analyses a project in the travel and tourism industry to determine the key elements that contributed to a successful outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethnographic approach is used in this case of a multi‐national, multi‐organisational virtual project tasked with market validation of an ontology management system. Participant observation is supported by a range of primary and secondary data.

Findings

The importance of key factors changes over the time of the project. The early emphasis on constructs relating to technology and purpose moves towards those related to people as the project matured. The caretaker/gatekeeper role of the project leader made a significant contribution to overcoming problems of complexity. A lack of commitment to a range of information technologies heightened the reliance on periodic face‐to‐face meetings to support team interactions.

Research limitations/implications

Cultural diversity is common in the travel sector and related issues may play a more significant role in other industries. Further research is needed to fully assess the impact of context on virtual team outcomes.

Practical implications

Recommendations for practitioners include the need to establish a framework of rules and identify training needs. A socialising period, virtual or face‐to‐face, is an essential requirement for successful virtual teamwork.

Originality/value

A conceptual framework, drawn from previous studies, adds clarity to the importance and relevance of the constructs of people, purpose and technology in virtual teamwork.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Michael Hallett and Dennis Powell

Examines the meanings of television programs for actor/police officers who acted in “reality TV” programs. Police engage in “legitimation work” to enhance public relations…

Abstract

Examines the meanings of television programs for actor/police officers who acted in “reality TV” programs. Police engage in “legitimation work” to enhance public relations and achieve favorable publicity. The media is increasingly prominent in areas where previously it was unseen. Presents results of a questionnaire in which police actors give mixed reactions to the usefulness of infotainment. Concludes that police participation in the production of infotainment subverts the goal of promoting “realistic” public expectations of police work.

Details

American Journal of Police, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0735-8547

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1966

The mechanical properties of carbon and graphite as structural materials have been improved considerably since the 1940s, and graphite equipment is widely used in chemical…

Abstract

The mechanical properties of carbon and graphite as structural materials have been improved considerably since the 1940s, and graphite equipment is widely used in chemical and other plant. Here is part of a talk given at the recent British industrial exhibition in Moscow by Dennis Hills, sales director of Powell Duffryn Chemical Engineering Ltd., who have specialised in carbon/graphite equipment under the trade name Delanium.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 13 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2012

Mirella M.N. Minkman

Although a large amount of literature about the levels, aims, and relevance of integrated care is present, to realise change in practice knowledge about the implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

Although a large amount of literature about the levels, aims, and relevance of integrated care is present, to realise change in practice knowledge about the implementation and development process of integrated care is also crucial. Instruments such as quality management models can facilitate improvement, but are not frequently used in integrated care practice. The purpose of this paper, therefore, is to present further insight into these models and into the related literature about network and organisational development.

Design/methodology/approach

An overview of the recent literature is presented.

Findings

The improvement of integrated care is complex and there is no consensus about a set of relevant elements for integrated care. Available quality management models vary in their underlying evidence and do not have integrated care as their central focus or are aimed at specific patient groups such as the chronically ill. The lack of a consistent set of elements and the need for a generic, evidence‐based quality management model for integrated care is important for integrated care improvement. It can be assumed that, as described in the literature about networks and organisations, dynamic stages or phases could be relevant for integrated care. These issues raise important next questions for further research and for facilitating organisational change.

Originality/value

The paper presents a current overview of the available literature about the concept of integrated care, with a special focus on integrated care improvement and its dynamics. It raises the relevant questions and challenges for the further expansion of knowledge about these topics, which will be addressed in a second article in a later issue of Journal of Integrated Care.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

John Rule, Roger Dunston and Nicky Solomon

This paper aims to provide an account of learning and change in the redesign of a primary health-care initiative in a large metropolitan city in Australia.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an account of learning and change in the redesign of a primary health-care initiative in a large metropolitan city in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on research exploring the place and role of learning in the re-making of health professional practices in a major New South Wales Government health reform called HealthOne. The analysis and findings presented here make reference to data drawn from a longitudinal ethnographic study (2011-2014) conducted by an inter-disciplinary team of researchers from the University of Technology Sydney. Socio-material and practice-based approaches for understanding learning are used in working with the data.

Findings

There were substantial changes in professional practice, especially in the role of the General Practice Liaison Nurse. Changes, and the learning connected to the changes, were dynamically influenced by the macro-context. HealthOne was a reform initiative with a strong focus on achieving health service redesign and a consistent focus on staff developing new ways of thinking and operating. Although learning was often discussed, it was, for the most part, expressed in general terms, and there was a lack of a formal and well-developed approach to learning collectively and individually.

Originality/value

This research paper will inform future attempts at service redesign in community and primary health contexts and provides a site-specific examination of workplace learning in a context of rapid change.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2005

Patricia H. Thornton, Candace Jones and Kenneth Kury

We contribute to the literature on institutional and organizational change by integrating two related areas of study: the theory and methods of analysis informed by the…

Abstract

We contribute to the literature on institutional and organizational change by integrating two related areas of study: the theory and methods of analysis informed by the research on institutional logics and historical-event sequencing. Institutional logics provide the theory to understand how the content of culture influences organizational change; historical-event sequencing reveals the underlying patterns of cultural transformation. We apply this dual perspective to the cases of institutional stability and change in organizational governance in three industries: accounting, architecture, and higher-education publishing. Research on governance has focused on changes in organizational design between markets, hierarchies, and networks. Missing from this research is an understanding of how institutions at the wider societal level motivate organizations to adopt one of these governance forms over another. We examine how the governance of firms in these industries has been influenced by the institutional logics of the professions, the market, the state, and the corporation by focusing on three mechanisms – institutional entrepreneurs, structural overlap, and historical-event sequencing. Overall, our findings reveal how accounting was influenced by state regulation producing a punctuated equilibrium model, architecture by professional duality producing a cyclical model, and publishing by market rationalization producing an evolutionary model of institutional change in organizational governance.

Details

Transformation in Cultural Industries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-365-5

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2017

Grégoire Croidieu, Birthe Soppe and Walter W. Powell

We analyze how institutional persistence unfolds. Building on an historical analysis of 3,307 bottle labels in the Bordeaux wine community, France, between 1924 and 2005…

Abstract

We analyze how institutional persistence unfolds. Building on an historical analysis of 3,307 bottle labels in the Bordeaux wine community, France, between 1924 and 2005, we find that the persistence of a chateau tradition requires considerable effort at maintenance. Instead of greater compression and taken-for-grantedness, we propose that expansion along multimodal carriers provides a marker of a deepening institutionalization. We underscore the role of community organizations in enabling a wine tradition to persist. The implications of our findings for institutional theory and multimodality research are discussed.

Details

Multimodality, Meaning, and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-332-8

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Matthew C. Sonfield and Robert N. Lussier

While family firms constitute a highly important component of most countries' economies, and in many countries a sizable portion of these family businesses are owned and…

Abstract

Purpose

While family firms constitute a highly important component of most countries' economies, and in many countries a sizable portion of these family businesses are owned and managed by women, there has been minimal study of gender issues in family business ownership and management. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design was self‐reported survey research, which is the most commonly used methodology in family business research and for small business and entrepreneurship quantitative research.

Findings

In contrast to early (pre‐1980) gender comparisons in management and entrepreneurship, and in support of the majority of more recent studies, this investigation found no significant relationships between the gender of family business owner‐managers and ten management characteristic variables in a sample of 593 family businesses in six countries.

Originality/value

These findings add to the limited and currently inconclusive body of knowledge regarding gender issues specifically in family business, and more generally in entrepreneurship and management.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Martin Loosemore, George Denny-Smith, Jo Barraket, Robyn Keast, Daniel Chamberlain, Kristy Muir, Abigail Powell, Dave Higgon and Jo Osborne

Social procurement policies are an emerging policy instrument being used by governments around the world to leverage infrastructure and construction spending to address…

Abstract

Purpose

Social procurement policies are an emerging policy instrument being used by governments around the world to leverage infrastructure and construction spending to address intractable social problems in the communities they represent. The relational nature of social procurement policies requires construction firms to develop new collaborative partnerships with organisations from the government, not-for-profit and community sectors. The aim of this paper is to address the paucity of research into the risks and opportunities of entering into these new cross-sector partnerships from the perspectives of the stakeholders involved and how this affects collaborative potential and social value outcomes for intended beneficiaries.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study research is based on a unique collaborative intermediary called Connectivity Centre created by an international contractor to coordinate its social procurement strategies. The findings draw on a thematic analysis of qualitative data from focus groups with 35 stakeholders from the construction, government, not-for-profit, social enterprise, education and employment sectors.

Findings

Findings indicate that potentially enormous opportunities which social procurement offers are being undermined by stakeholder nervousness about policy design, stability and implementation, poor risk management, information asymmetries, perverse incentives, candidate supply constraints, scepticism, traditional recruitment practices and industry capacity constraints. While these risks can be mitigated through collaborative initiatives like Connectivity Centres, this depends on new “relational” skills, knowledge and competencies which do not currently exist in construction. In conclusion, when social procurement policy requirements are excessive and imposed top-down, with little understanding of the construction industry's compliance capacity, intended social outcomes of these policies are unlikely to be achieved.

Originality/value

This research draws on theories of cross-sector collaboration developed in the realm of public sector management to address the lack of research into how the new cross-sector partnerships encouraged by emerging social procurement policies work in the construction industry. Contributing to the emerging literature on cross-sector collaboration, the findings expose the many challenges of working in cross-sector partnerships in highly transitionary project-based environments like construction.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2018

Daniel B. Cornfield, Jonathan S. Coley, Larry W. Isaac and Dennis C. Dickerson

As a site of contestation among job seekers, workers, and managers, the bureaucratic workplace both reproduces and erodes occupational race segregation and racial status…

Abstract

As a site of contestation among job seekers, workers, and managers, the bureaucratic workplace both reproduces and erodes occupational race segregation and racial status hierarchies. Much sociological research has examined the reproduction of racial inequality at work; however, little research has examined how desegregationist forces, including civil rights movement values, enter and permeate bureaucratic workplaces into the broader polity. Our purpose in this chapter is to introduce and typologize what we refer to as “occupational activism,” defined as socially transformative individual and collective action that is conducted and realized through an occupational role or occupational community. We empirically induce and present a typology from our study of the half-century-long, post-mobilization occupational careers of over 60 veterans of the nonviolent Nashville civil rights movement of the early 1960s. The fourfold typology of occupational activism is framed in the “new” sociology of work, which emphasizes the role of worker agency and activism in determining worker life chances, and in the “varieties of activism” perspective, which treats the typology as a coherent regime of activist roles in the dialogical diffusion of civil rights movement values into, within, and out of workplaces. We conclude with a research agenda on how bureaucratic workplaces nurture and stymie occupational activism as a racially desegregationist force at work and in the broader polity.

Details

Race, Identity and Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-501-6

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