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Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2003

Anne Bartlett is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago. She holds a degree in Sociology and Social Policy from the University of…

Abstract

Anne Bartlett is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of Chicago. She holds a degree in Sociology and Social Policy from the University of the West of England and Masters degree in Sociology from the University of Chicago. Prior to this, she worked in various capacities in the British government for over fifteen years. Her Ph.D. research centers on the changing nature of political subjectivity in London, particularly as it pertains to the lives of refugees and migrants. Her other areas of interest include sociological theory, globalization, human rights and evolving forms of political culture.Katie Cangemi is a student at DePaul University.Terry Nichols Clark is Professor of Sociology at the University of Chicago. He holds MA and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University, and has taught at Columbia, Harvard, Yale, the Sorbonne, University of Florence, and UCLA. He has worked at the Brookings Institution, The Urban Institute, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and US Conference of Mayors. His books include Citizen Politics in Post-Industrial Society, City Money, The New Political Culture, and Urban Innovation. Since 1982 he has been Coordinator of the Fiscal Austerity and Urban Innovation (FAUI) Project, which includes a data base of over 10,000 municipalities in up to 35 countries. It is the most extensive study to date of local government in the world, including data, some 700 participants, a budget exceeding $20 million, and 50 published books, much available on the website http://www.src.uchicago.edu/depts/faui/archive.htmlRichard Florida is the author of the groundbreaking book, The Rise of the Creative Class: And How Its Transforming Work, Leisure Community and Everyday Life Basic Books 2002, stressing the rise of creativity as an economic force. He is the H. John Heinz III Professor of Economic Development at Carnegie Mellon University, where he is founder and co-director of the Software Industry Center. He has been a visiting professor at MIT and Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is co-author of five other books, including Industrializing Knowledge; Beyond Mass Production and The Breakthrough Illusion, and more than 100 articles in academic journals. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from Rutgers College and Ph.D. from Columbia University.Gary Gates works in the Population Studies Center of The Urban Institute in Washington DC 20037. He completed his Ph.D. at Carnegie Mellon University, and is a leading researcher on gays in the U.S.Edward Glaeser is a Professor of Economics at Harvard University. He teaches urban and social economics and microeconomic theory. He has published dozens of papers on cities, economic growth, and law and economics. In particular, his work has focused on the determinants of city growth and the role of cities as centers of idea transmission. He also edits the Quarterly Journal of Economics. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1992.Pushpam Jain completed a Ph.D. at the University of Chicago.Jed Kolko is at the Department of Economics, Harvard University.Lauren Langman is Professor of Sociology at Loyola University, Chicago. His interests include alienation studies, Marxist sociology and cultural sociology. Recent publications include: Suppose They Gave a Culture War and No-one Came: Zippergate and the Carnivalization of Political Culture, American Behavioral Scientist (December, 2002); The Body and the Mediation of Hegemony: From Subject to Citizen to Audience, in Richard Brown (Ed.) Body, Self and Identity (University of Minnesota Press, 2002); From the Poetics of Pleasure to the Poetics of Protest, in Paul Kennedy (Ed.) Identity in the Global Age (Macmillan & Palmore, 2001); with Douglas Morris and Jackie Zalewski, Globalization, Domination and Cyberactivism, in Wilma A. Dunaway (Ed.) The 21st Century World-System: Systemic Crises and Antisystemic Resistance (Greenwood Press, 2002).Richard Lloyd teaches at Vanderbilt University, he completed his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. His research interests include urban culture. Postindustrial economy, and labor force participation.Dennis Merritt completed a BA at the University of Chicago and MA at DePaul University. He was Analysis Manager of the Fiscal Austerity and Urban Innovation Project for four years.Albert Saiz is in the Research Department, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. He completed a Ph.D. in Economics at Harvard.Lenka Siroky studied at the Universities of Prague and Budapest, spent two years at the University of Chicago, and is currently studying at Harvard University.Kenneth Wong is Professor of Public Policy and Education and Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University. He also serves as Associate Director of the Peabody Center for Education Policy at Vanderbilt University. He was Associate Professor in the Department of Education and the Social Sciences Division at the University of Chicago, where he earned his doctorate in political science. He has conducted research in American government, urban school reform, state finance and educational policies, intergovernmental relations, and federal educational policies (Title I). He is author of Funding Public Schools: Politics and Policy (1999), and City Choices: Education and Housing (1990), and a co-author of When Federalism Works (1986). He is currently the President of the Politics of Education Association.Alexei Zelenev is an Associate Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. He received his Bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Chicago.

Details

The City as an Entertainment Machine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-060-9

Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2003

Terry Nichols Clark, Dennis Merritt and Lenka Siroky

The International Mayor provides a quick but precise overview of mayors and their cities around the world. As the Fiscal Austerity and Urban Innovation (FAUI) Project is…

Abstract

The International Mayor provides a quick but precise overview of mayors and their cities around the world. As the Fiscal Austerity and Urban Innovation (FAUI) Project is unique in its extensive coverage, so is this report.

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The City as an Entertainment Machine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-060-9

Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2003

Abstract

Details

The City as an Entertainment Machine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-060-9

Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2003

Anne Bartlett, Terry Nichols Clark and Dennis Merritt

This paper charts new ground by first considering a paradigmatic shift in the nature of political decision making, driven by globalization and post-industrial trends…

Abstract

This paper charts new ground by first considering a paradigmatic shift in the nature of political decision making, driven by globalization and post-industrial trends. Second, it uses an original methodology to identify political culture and policy focus – a content analysis of some 60 websites of local authorities across Britain. We hope that the substantive results as well as the methodological lessons about how to study these issues systematically may interest British readers as well as persons confronting similar issues around the world. We particularly recommend the website analysis methodology as a relatively inexpensive procedure for conducting research globally. Many local governments worldwide now have websites – for instance over 80% of Korean local governments do, as Korean researchers reported in starting a similar content analysis.

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The City as an Entertainment Machine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-060-9

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Tao Sun, Marty Horn and Dennis Merritt

Based on a multi‐national lifestyle survey, this study investigated consumer lifestyle differences between individualist cultures (Britain and the USA) and collectivist…

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Abstract

Based on a multi‐national lifestyle survey, this study investigated consumer lifestyle differences between individualist cultures (Britain and the USA) and collectivist cultures (China and Japan). Congruent with previous findings on values and lifestyles differences between idiocentrics (individualists) and allocentrics (collectivists) at the emic level (USA), this etic‐level (cross‐cultural) study found that consumers in the individualist cultures, compared with those in the collectivist cultures, were more brand‐savvy, travel‐oriented, satisfied with their lives, financially satisfied and optimistic. They were also more likely to consider themselves better managers of finances. Findings that were incongruent with those at the emic level were also discussed (e.g. dressing behavior, opinion leadership and impulsive buying). Additional findings were provided as well (e.g. family orientation, gender roles, safety/security). The findings carry practical implications for international marketers whose products/services cut across both individualist and collectivist cultures.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Tao Sun, Marty Horn and Denny Merritt

The purpose of this research is to introduce and test a path model that explores the effects of Hofstede's cultural value dimensions on consumers' intention to eat a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to introduce and test a path model that explores the effects of Hofstede's cultural value dimensions on consumers' intention to eat a healthy diet, through the mediation of their public self‐consciousness.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 21,974 subjects from 25 nations were surveyed in this cross‐cultural consumer study.

Findings

As the model demonstrated, individualism and uncertainty avoidance had negative impacts on public self‐consciousness, while power distance and masculinity positively affected public self‐consciousness, which in turn had a positive influence on consumers' intention to eat a healthy diet.

Originality/value

The study measured each nation's cultural values by assigning the national culture index scores originally computed by Hofstede. This operational approach made it possible to develop and test a hierarchical path model on the relationships among cultural values, mediating variables and consumer behaviors. It also used the 3M model as a theoretical structure for investigating the nomological validity of two new constructs that are relevant to the field of consumer marketing (i.e. public self‐consciousness and intention to eat a healthy diet). Managerial implications are provided.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Abstract

Details

Gaming and the Virtual Sublime: Rhetoric, Awe, Fear, and Death in Contemporary Video Games
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-431-1

Book part
Publication date: 10 May 2017

Maya Manian

As numerous scholars have noted, the law takes a strikingly incoherent approach to adolescent reproduction. States overwhelmingly allow a teenage girl to independently…

Abstract

As numerous scholars have noted, the law takes a strikingly incoherent approach to adolescent reproduction. States overwhelmingly allow a teenage girl to independently consent to pregnancy care and medical treatment for her child, and even to give up her child for adoption, all without notice to her parents, but require parental notice or consent for abortion. This chapter argues that this oft-noted contradiction in the law on teenage reproductive decision-making is in fact not as contradictory as it first appears. A closer look at the law’s apparently conflicting approaches to teenage abortion and teenage childbirth exposes common ground that scholars have overlooked. The chapter compares the full spectrum of minors’ reproductive rights and unmasks deep similarities in the law on adolescent reproduction – in particular an undercurrent of desire to punish (female) teenage sexuality, whether pregnant girls choose abortion or childbirth. It demonstrates that in practice, the law undermines adolescents’ reproductive rights, whichever path of pregnancy resolution they choose. At the same time that the law thwarts adolescents’ access to abortion care, it also fails to protect adolescents’ rights as parents. The analysis shows that these two superficially conflicting sets of rules in fact work in tandem to enforce a traditional gender script – that self-sacrificing mothers should give birth and give up their infants to better circumstances, no matter the emotional costs to themselves. This chapter also suggests novel policy solutions to the difficulties posed by adolescent reproduction by urging reforms that look to third parties other than parents or the State to better support adolescent decision-making relating to pregnancy and parenting.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-344-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Dennis Sherwood

Is corporate culture a key to commercial success? The results of asurvey, carried out in 1989, in which senior executives of the largestretailers in the UK describe the…

1852

Abstract

Is corporate culture a key to commercial success? The results of a survey, carried out in 1989, in which senior executives of the largest retailers in the UK describe the key characteristics of their corporate cultures, and how their cultures are maintained and evolve, are outlined. They also rank “corporate culture” alongside 14 other key factors which strongly influence corporate strategy or competitive advantage. Three clusters emerge: those who rank people‐related values highly, those who are predominantly market‐led, and those who value “hard” factors such as financial control.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Jean Raar

Stakeholder theory provided the broad theoretical lens to explore environmental issues in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The diversity in issues examined ranged from…

1199

Abstract

Purpose

Stakeholder theory provided the broad theoretical lens to explore environmental issues in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The diversity in issues examined ranged from concern for immediate stakeholders, their industry group and the influence of global warming on their business activities, to the type of environmental information included within their internal information systems. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A mailed survey was used to obtain data from SMEs operating in Australia. The focus was primarily directed to medium size firms.

Findings

The findings indicate that SMEs were aware that their stakeholders, particularly their employees and customers were concerned with environmental issues. The respondent SMEs were also aware that global warming would influence their activities, for example, the design of their projects, occupational, health and safety, labour contracts and customer relations. Overall, the findings suggest that any tailored approach to regulate or self-regulate environmental management in SMEs, be industry and stakeholder driven.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research are primarily those applicable to the survey method, SME response rates, and the geographical location covered by the survey. The focus of this study is primarily medium size firms, rather than micro small business.

Originality/value

This study gains insights into some of the practical aspects of environmental management in SMEs and in so doing adds to the growing body of literature in this under researched area.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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