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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Denise E. Agosto

This paper aims to provide a reflection on youth information behaviors and practices in the research literature and suggest future directions for scholarship in this area.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a reflection on youth information behaviors and practices in the research literature and suggest future directions for scholarship in this area.

Findings

The author identifies areas for strengthening the impact of research and scholarship in the area of youth information behaviors and practices, including standardizing the age groups of research subjects, diversifying data collection methods, broadening the participation of marginalized groups and working to understand youth information behaviors and practices from youths’ own perspectives.

Originality/value

This paper offers a personal assessment of the current state of the field, provides a broad overview of the author’s research in this area and suggests ideas for moving this work forward. It also highlights the importance of making research results readily available to adults who work with and care for youth, including teachers, librarians, product designers, parents and other caregivers.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 September 2022

Suzanne Grossman, Lisa Jane Erwin, Ana Martinez-Donate, Denise E. Agosto, Mark Winston, Nancy Epstein and Ann C. Klassen

Public libraries can help immigrants adjust to life in the USA, including maintaining health and well-being. The purpose of this study was to understand how immigrants use public…

Abstract

Purpose

Public libraries can help immigrants adjust to life in the USA, including maintaining health and well-being. The purpose of this study was to understand how immigrants use public libraries and how library staff provide health-related information and services for immigrant audiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used semistructured interviews with library staff (n = 9) and immigrant library patrons (n = 10), representing multiple first languages and countries of origin from two different library locations within a large public library system in a US mid-Atlantic city.

Findings

Staff reported offering many health-related programs and services, but only one of the 10 patron respondents had used them. Patrons more commonly used the library in ways indirectly related to health (e.g. learning English) than direct health-related services. Staff reported comfort interacting with immigrant patrons, but lacked consensus on navigating language barriers and determining community needs.

Research limitations/implications

This qualitative study provides insights from a specific geographic and cultural setting. It focused on immigrants using the library and may have excluded vulnerable populations of immigrants who encounter barriers to using the library. Future research and practice should focus on how public libraries can better meet the health information needs of immigrant populations, including navigating controversial social and political topics, as well as emerging health-related information during a pandemic.

Originality/value

Public health practitioners often overlook public libraries as community collaborators. This research identifies that while there is important and essential work happening in public libraries to improve immigrant health, more can be done, especially in collaboration with public health professionals.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2022

Denise E. Agosto

This paper aims to discuss the concept of “literacy” within the new literacy, new literacies and library and information science (LIS) discourses. It proposes widening the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the concept of “literacy” within the new literacy, new literacies and library and information science (LIS) discourses. It proposes widening the prevailing LIS conceptualization of adolescent literacy, which focuses largely on information literacy in academic settings, to a broader, information practice-based, sociocultural framing that encompasses the full range of adolescents’ everyday life contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The author presents a literature review and personal reflection on a series of adolescent information activities to show the value of framing the LIS discourse on adolescent literacy within a broader sociocultural perspective.

Findings

Based on the discussion, the author proposes a framework for future investigations of adolescents’ literacy practices that views adolescent literacy as fundamentally social and communicative; multiformat; multicontextual; multigenerational; and culturally situated.

Originality/value

A broader sociocultural approach to the LIS information literacy discourse can lead to deeper understanding of the co-constructed and collaborative nature of adolescents’ new literacies practices. It can also enable stronger recognition of the impact of power and privilege on adolescent literacy practices. Finally, this essay shows the value of reflecting on adolescent information activities for challenging narrow views of literacy and highlights the social embeddedness of new literacies activities in adolescents’ everyday lives.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 February 2022

Denise E. Agosto and Shannon M. Oltmann

Abstract

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 123 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Yuanyuan Feng and Denise E. Agosto

Building on theoretical foundation of personal information management (PIM) in information science, this paper seeks to understand how activity tracker users manage their personal…

2110

Abstract

Purpose

Building on theoretical foundation of personal information management (PIM) in information science, this paper seeks to understand how activity tracker users manage their personal health information generated by their devices and to elucidate future activity tracking technology in support of personal health information management (PHIM). This paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a web survey study with a specific group of activity tracker users – amateur runners. This survey collected both quantitative and qualitative data on participants’ engagement with activity tracking technology, their PHIM practices with the information generated by the technology and how their needs were being met by their activity tracking technology use and PHIM practices.

Findings

Amateur runners surveyed in this study exhibit long-term engagement and frequent interaction with activity tracking technology. They also engage in PHIM practices by using a range of PHIM tools and performing various PHIM activities. Furthermore, they use activity tracking technology and engage in PHIM practices to meet various health/fitness-related needs and information needs, while some of these needs such as performance needs and overarching needs are only partially met or unmet.

Originality/value

This research discusses amateur runners as power users of activity tracking technology, provides timely updates to PIM and PHIM research in light of a new type of personal health information, and generates design considerations for future activity tracking technology in support of PHIM. It also brings together previously disparate research regarding everyday life PHIM in information science, human–computer interaction and health informatics.

Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2008

Denise E. Agosto

In response to recent public library funding deficiencies, many people both inside and outside the field of librarianship have suggested that public libraries need to rely less on…

Abstract

In response to recent public library funding deficiencies, many people both inside and outside the field of librarianship have suggested that public libraries need to rely less on traditional government funding and more on alternative funding sources. This chapter reports the results of a review of the research and professional literature relating to government and alternative funding for US public libraries and presents a case study of the West Chester (PA) Public Library, which relies heavily on non-tax funds for its operations. It concludes with an analysis of the major arguments for and against alternative funding for public libraries and a consideration of the implications for public librarianship in the United States.

Details

Influence of Funding on Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-373-6

Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2023

Amber Matthews and Sandie Thomas

Neutrality and diversity are the bedrock of public libraries. Yet, public libraries are also steeped in white privilege and many have yet to examine the effects of anti-Black…

Abstract

Neutrality and diversity are the bedrock of public libraries. Yet, public libraries are also steeped in white privilege and many have yet to examine the effects of anti-Black racism. Amidst an ever-growing crisis of inequity, this chapter explores the development of the Black Community Public Library and its roots in Black-centered and community-based perspectives. It provides important insights into how public libraries can transgress the centrality of whiteness in traditional public libraries through community-led and community-based partnerships within collaborative anti-racism and justice frameworks. Opening in January 2022, the Black Community Public Library is the first of its kind to conceptualize and highlight the need for Black-centered services and collections in Canadian public libraries. Located in the Where We Are Now Black Community Centre, the library is the result of a year-long partnership between the Black Community Centre, local higher education institutions, and the municipal library system. It holds an initial circulating collection of 600 titles representing a variety of equity-seeking perspectives. Detailing the development and launch of the Black Community Public Library, this case study demonstrates how to re-envision library spaces with and for communities that have been historically under-represented and provides invaluable insight into how the public library sector can support and engage with Black communities through meaningful partnership and collaboration. Furthermore, it will substantially contribute to the growing body of collaborative knowledge on advancing anti-racism in LIS.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2016

Abstract

Details

Perspectives on Libraries as Institutions of Human Rights and Social Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-057-2

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2008

Abstract

Details

Influence of Funding on Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-373-6

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Abstract

Details

Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities and the Inclusive Future of Libraries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-652-6

1 – 10 of 28