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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Denise D. Schoenbachler and Geoffrey L. Gordon

Observes that traditional retail, catalog, and online‐only businesses face a critical decision – to accept a new, yet unrefined business model that includes multiple…

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25700

Abstract

Observes that traditional retail, catalog, and online‐only businesses face a critical decision – to accept a new, yet unrefined business model that includes multiple channels or to retain their single channel model and risk becoming obsolete and left behind by new, multi‐channel competitors. The decision process and implementation of a multi‐channel strategy could be simplified if businesses understood what drives consumers to a single channel, multiple channels, and which channels are preferred. Outlines the key issues facing multi‐channel marketers, and encourages multi‐channel businesses to take a customer‐centric view rather than a channel focused view to work through the challenges unique to the multi‐channel marketer. A model of multi‐channel buyer behavior is proposed to help the multi‐channel marketer develop a customer‐centric view. Presents a series of propositions which serve to encourage and direct future research in this area.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Denise D. Schoenbachler, Geoffrey L. Gordon and Timothy W. Aurand

Building brand loyalty has become more important, yet more difficult to achieve in today's marketplace. This research investigates a possible avenue for building brand…

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17408

Abstract

Building brand loyalty has become more important, yet more difficult to achieve in today's marketplace. This research investigates a possible avenue for building brand loyalty that is not directly related to the marketing of the product – attracting individual investors in the brand's corporate parent. A survey of over 500 individual investors revealed that individual investors do tend to buy brands from companies in which they hold stock, and investors may buy stock in a company because they have experience with the brand. In contrast with brand loyalty, where consumers will not buy competitive offerings, individual investors indicated they would buy competitive offerings, suggesting that stock ownership is more likely to lead to repeat purchase behavior, but not brand loyalty.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Kimberly Judson, Denise D. Schoenbachler, Geoffrey L. Gordon, Rick E. Ridnour and Dan C. Weilbaker

The purpose of this research is to provide an empirical examination of the role of the salesperson in the new product/service development process.

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4190

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to provide an empirical examination of the role of the salesperson in the new product/service development process.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was mailed to 2,650 sales managers representing US firms across the nation, and the resulting sample size consisted of 246 respondents with a response rate of 9.3 percent. The survey sample included firms with a business‐to‐business emphasis, and those with a minimum of 50 employees.

Findings

The majority of the respondents reported that salespeople are indirectly or directly involved in the new product/service development process. In spite of this contribution, many firms do not directly reward salespeople for their involvement. Offering appropriate incentives could greatly increase their efforts to collect information for new product/service idea generation.

Research limitations/implications

Suggested future research includes the perspectives of salespeople, new product development directors, etc. In addition, the study was strictly domestic and could benefit from an international focus, as well as a comparison of products versus services sectors.

Practical implications

The findings from this study can be used by managers as a benchmark for assessing sales force participation in the new product/service development, and to identify ways to encourage increased participation by the sales force with incentives.

Originality/value

Little formalized research has been conducted on the specific role that salespeople play in the new product/service development process. The findings from this study may provide strategic guidance to organizations with respect to the role of salespeople in the critical new product/service development process.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Denise D. Schoenbachler, Geoffrey L. Gordon, Dawn Foley and Linda Spellman

As consumer marketers have become increasingly disenchanted with traditional “shotgun” mass‐media approaches to reaching customers, database marketing has emerged as the…

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32656

Abstract

As consumer marketers have become increasingly disenchanted with traditional “shotgun” mass‐media approaches to reaching customers, database marketing has emerged as the answer to marketers’ woes. Despite its widespread use by direct marketers, database marketing is relatively new to consumer marketers and, as such, leaves some consumer marketers confused as to why it works and how to implement a database program. Presents a managerially relevant introduction to database marketing. Defines database marketing, outlines its advantages and disadvantages and describes application examples. Provides managers with a practical approach to developing a database marketing program. Reviews some trends in database marketing to prepare the consumer marketer for changes in the database marketing program.

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Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Geoffrey L. Gordon, Denise D. Schoenbachler, Peter F. Kaminski and Kimberly A. Brouchous

The development process for new products is critically dependent on customer‐generated new product ideas. Although several conduits exist for identifying and communicating…

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2716

Abstract

The development process for new products is critically dependent on customer‐generated new product ideas. Although several conduits exist for identifying and communicating these ideas, by far the most productive one is the organization’s salesforce. While the integral role of salespeople as the linkage between buyers and sellers is generally acknowledged by many researchers, little empirical evidence exists which explores this role. This paper explores the role of the salesforce as an information source in the opportunity identification phase of the new product development process. It presents results of an empirical study of 223 sales managers concerning actual use and effectiveness of the salesforce as a source of new product ideas and proposes specific recommendations concerning improved utilization of the salesforce as a source of new product ideas generated from customers.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Timothy W. Aurand, Denise D. Schoenbachler and Geoffrey L. Gordon

One of the most popular topics in American business today is reengineering. Rarely has such a misunderstood term been embraced so widely in theory and in practice…

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1415

Abstract

One of the most popular topics in American business today is reengineering. Rarely has such a misunderstood term been embraced so widely in theory and in practice. Numerous definitions and lists of key components to successful reengineering have confused managers as to what reengineering is in theory and in practice. Brings together the diverse literature and identifies clearly the activities, questions and process changes theorized to be necessary in reengineering efforts. In addition, reports the results of a survey designed to assess which of these purported activities, questions and process changes are, in practice, part of reengineering efforts as perceived by marketing professionals. Over 200 marketing professionals revealed their perception of firms’ involvement in reengineering, and evaluated involvement in key activities, process changes and asking of fundamental questions. The results reveal interesting discrepancies between theoretical reengineering and reengineering in practice. Implies that reengineering may not be a black‐and‐white issue, but rather exist on a gray continuum.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Terrence V. O′Brien, Denise D. Schoenbachler and Geoffrey L. Gordon

Knowledge about the external environment is essential for anorganization to remain competitive in the marketplace. To this end, amarketing information system (MKIS) can be…

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3622

Abstract

Knowledge about the external environment is essential for an organization to remain competitive in the marketplace. To this end, a marketing information system (MKIS) can be used as a powerful tool for translating raw data into useful information to assist managers in making strategic and operational decisions. However, even with the vast technological advances of the past decade, research has found that current information systems, in many instances, still exist in rudimentary stages of development, exhibiting disappointing degrees of success. Focusses on examining reasons for this state of affairs and then proceeds to present the knowledge, in a managerially relevant and understandable format, needed to develop and implement an MKIS effectively. Presents applications of effective MKISs along with managerial implications.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Justin L. Davis, R. Greg Bell, G. Tyge Payne and Patrick M. Kreiser

Organizational researchers have long recognized the important role that top managers play within entrepreneurial firms (Ireland, Hitt and Sirmon 2003). Utilizing Covin and…

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1975

Abstract

Organizational researchers have long recognized the important role that top managers play within entrepreneurial firms (Ireland, Hitt and Sirmon 2003). Utilizing Covin and Slevin’s (1989) conceptual framework, the current study explores three key entrepreneurial characteristics of top managers and the impact these characteristics have on firm performance. Specifically, we argue that top managers with a high tolerance of risk, those who favor innovative activities and those who display a high degree of proactiveness will positively impact firm performance. In addition, this study examines the influence of top managers’ prestige, structural and expert power on the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation and firm performance. We conclude the study with a discussion of theoretical and practical implications of our findings and suggestions for future research in this area of study.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2009

Jie Zhang and Terry Daugherty

Few studies have explored the direct influence of social networking websites (SNWs), and to the best of our knowledge, none have examined the indirect influence of SNWs on…

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4454

Abstract

Few studies have explored the direct influence of social networking websites (SNWs), and to the best of our knowledge, none have examined the indirect influence of SNWs on users and how that indirect influence leads to word‐of‐mouth related behaviors in SNWs. This study employs the theoretical framework of the third‐person effect theory, which is grounded in psychology, to examine the indirect influence of SNWs and how that indirect influence may potentially contribute to marketing research and practice. Davison’s (1983) third‐person effect (TPE) theory proposes that individuals tend to expect mass media to have a greater effect on others than on themselves. After the analysis of survey data, the current research first explores whether a third‐person effect exists in the SNW context and if it does, how it differs from that in traditional media context. Based on theory and numerous empirical findings, the current research also investigates how the thirdperson effect varies with different referent “others”. Finally, based on the theoretical propositions of previous studies, this study links third‐person effect to behavioral consequences related to word‐of‐mouth communication via SNWs. The results support all hypotheses. This work contributes to consumer psychology and word‐of‐mouth communication research, and generates implications for marketers targeting young consumers and/or those interested in stimulating word‐of‐mouth communication in the SNW context. Limitations are also addressed.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2007

Mari W. Buche and Joanne L. Scillitoe

New technology‐based ventures (NTBVs) gain access to beneficial social capital through their affiliation with technology incubators, organizations created to facilitate…

Abstract

New technology‐based ventures (NTBVs) gain access to beneficial social capital through their affiliation with technology incubators, organizations created to facilitate learning leading to the successful development of nascent firms. Scillitoe and Chakrabarti (2005, 2) identified three sources of beneficial social capital within human networks, “historical ties, organizational facilitation, and trustbased shared pursuit of common goals”, with organizational facilitation identified as the primary source of beneficial social capital for ventures within technology incubators. The current study extends this prior research investigating the development of social capital of NTBVs through incubator facilitation, focusing on the influence of female founders. Results are based on surveys collected from fifty‐four technology‐based firms affiliated with technology incubators in the United States and Finland. The results from this exploratory study show that the speed of technological learning is negatively affected by the interpersonal network access in firms with female founding management team members. Technological learning includes acquiring knowledge of legal protection of intellectual property, complex technological and scientific knowledge, and design and production skills that enable the development and commercialization of NTBV products and services (Deeds, DeCarolis, and Coombs, 1999). This finding contradicts prior research that suggests technological development of ventures is positively influenced by interpersonal network access through incubators (Hansen, Chesbrough, Nohria, and Sull 2000; Scillitoe and Chakrabarti 2005). Implications for technology incubator managers, NTBV founders, and economic development agencies that support technology incubators are discussed.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

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