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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Savannah Spivey Young, Denise C. Lewis, Assaf Oshri, Peter Gilbey, Arie Eisenman, Richard J. Schuster and Desiree M. Seponski

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings on interpersonal relational processes of Israeli healthcare providers (HCPs) and Syrian patients and caregivers using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings on interpersonal relational processes of Israeli healthcare providers (HCPs) and Syrian patients and caregivers using data collected in two Israeli hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a parallel mixed-methods design, data were integrated from observations, interviews, and surveys. In total, 20 HCPs and three Syrian patient caregivers provided interview data. Quantitative data were collected from 204 HCPs using surveys. The qualitative component included the phenomenological coding. The quantitative analysis included factor analysis procedures. Throughout parallel analysis, data were mixed dialogically to form warranted assertions.

Findings

Results from mixed analyses support a three-factor model representing the HCPs’ experiences treating Syrian patients. Factors were predicted by religious and occupational differences and included professional baseline, humanitarian insecurity, and medical humanitarianism.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study included issues of power, language differences, and a small Syrian caregiver sample.

Practical implications

As the fearful, injured, and sick continue to flee violence and cross geopolitical borders, the healthcare community will be called upon to treat migrants and refugees according to ethical healthcare principles.

Originality/value

The value of this research is in its critical examination of the HCPs’ interactions with patients, a relationship that propels humanitarian healthcare in the face of a global migrant crisis.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Sarah E. DeYoung, Denise C. Lewis, Desiree M. Seponski, Danielle A. Augustine and Monysakada Phal

Using two main research questions, the purpose of this paper is to examine well-being and preparedness among Cambodian and Laotian immigrants living near the Gulf Coast of…

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1046

Abstract

Purpose

Using two main research questions, the purpose of this paper is to examine well-being and preparedness among Cambodian and Laotian immigrants living near the Gulf Coast of the USA, and the ways in which indicators such as sense of community and risk perception are related to these constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a cross-sectional prospective design to examine disaster preparedness and well-being among Laotian and Cambodian immigrant communities. Quantitative survey data using purposive snowball sampling were collected throughout several months in Alabama, Mississippi, Florida and Louisiana.

Findings

Results from two multiple regressions revealed that sense of community and age contributed to well-being and were significant in the model, but with a negative relationship between age and well-being. Risk perception, confidence in government, confidence in engaging household preparedness and ability to cope with a financial crisis were significant predictors and positively related to disaster preparedness.

Practical implications

Well-being and disaster preparedness can be bolstered through community-based planning that seeks to address urgent needs of the people residing in vulnerable coastal locations. Specifically, immigrants who speak English as a second language, elder individuals and households in the lowest income brackets should be supported in disaster planning and outreach.

Originality/value

Cambodian and Laotian American immigrants rely upon the Gulf Coast’s waters for fishing, crab and shrimp income. Despite on-going hazard and disasters, few studies address preparedness among immigrant populations in the USA. This study fills a gap in preparedness research as well as factors associated with well-being, an important aspect of long-term resilience.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2015

Kelly Chermack, Erin L. Kelly, Phyllis Moen and Samantha K. Ammons

The purpose of this chapter was to examine the implementation of a flexible work initiative that attempted to challenge two institutionalized precepts of contemporary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter was to examine the implementation of a flexible work initiative that attempted to challenge two institutionalized precepts of contemporary white-collar workplaces: the gendered ideal worker norm, with its expectation of the primacy of paid work over family and personal life, and the assumption of managerial control over employees’ schedules and work location.

Methodology/approach

Using ethnographic and interview data, how the Results Only Work Environment (ROWE) was experienced by employees in four different teams within the Best Buy, Co., Inc. corporate headquarters was explored.

Findings

Comparing more and less successful implementation across teams, results suggested that collective institutional work is required for the emergence of new norms, expectations, and legitimated practices. Findings indicated that managers’ task-specific knowledge – their deep experience with the tasks that the team is charged with completing – is a structural condition that facilitates managers’ trust in employees and encourages team experimentation with new practices.

Research limitations

Data for this study was limited to one organization and four teams. Future research should include similar organizational change efforts in other organizations and in larger teams.

Practical/social implications

These findings may promote a better understanding, among researchers and practitioners, of the importance of manager knowledge and background and how this appears to be key to achieving institutional change.

Originality/value

This research is an example of an innovative approach to workplace flexibility and applies an institutional theory lens to investigate variation in the implementation of organizational change.

Details

Work and Family in the New Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-630-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Denise S. Saxon and Beth D. Kieswetter

Late last year, the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) and the National Association of Securities Dealers (“NASD”) proposed rule changes designed to strengthen the…

Abstract

Late last year, the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) and the National Association of Securities Dealers (“NASD”) proposed rule changes designed to strengthen the requirements relating to supervision and internal controls. Through these rule proposals, the NASD and NYSE appear to be emphasizing the need for brokerage firms to have in place internal controls separate and distinct from supervisory systems. In speeches, the staff of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) also has emphasized that internal controls are integral to a brokerage firm’s operations. But, where did the concepts of “supervision” and “internal controls” come from? How has the concept of “internal controls” evolved in the brokerage industry? Do the NYSE and NASD proposals change the substantive supervisory obligations of broker‐dealers? What steps can brokerage firms take now to prepare for, and respond to, regulatory scrutiny of their systems for supervision and internal controls? This article explores these issues.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Nikola Djurkovic, Darcy McCormack, Helge Hoel and Denise Salin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perspectives of human resource professionals (HRPs) and employee representatives (ERs) on the role of HRPs in managing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the perspectives of human resource professionals (HRPs) and employee representatives (ERs) on the role of HRPs in managing workplace bullying.

Design/methodology/approach

Individual interviews were conducted with 12 HRPs and five ERs from a wide range of industries. Interview questions were open-ended and sought to gain insight on the views of the individual interviewees.

Findings

The findings address the role of HRPs in bullying scenarios and in the prevention of bullying. Regarding the role of HRPs in bullying, the responses of the participants suggest confusion and ambiguity, with a variety of roles being described ranging from a support-based role through to a protector of management. The participants also noted the importance of the HRP task of policy development, while a distrust of HRPs in bullying scenarios was mentioned. Regarding the effective management and prevention of bullying, the findings demonstrate that HRPs are viewed as having a central role through their particular responsibilities of creating and nurturing a positive organisational culture, as well as through engaging employees in the development of anti-bullying policies.

Practical implications

HRPs believe that they can contribute significantly to reducing workplace bullying through organisational culture (including educating staff and as role models of behaviour) and by engaging staff in the design of anti-bullying policies.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on workplace bullying by examining within the Australian context the perspectives of HRPs and ERs on how HRPs can prevent and manage workplace bullying.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2019

Kari Einarsen, Denise Salin, Ståle Valvatne Einarsen, Anders Skogstad and Reidar Johan Mykletun

Drawing on the resource-based view, the purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which the level of the organization’s human resource management (HRM) practices…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the resource-based view, the purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which the level of the organization’s human resource management (HRM) practices, perceived financial resources and organizational size predict the existence of a well-developed ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying.

Design/methodology/approach

The human resource (HR) managers or the main health and safety representatives (HSRs) in 216 Norwegian municipalities responded to an electronic survey, representing some 50 percent of the municipalities.

Findings

The level of high-quality HRM practice predicted the existence of an ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying, particularly informal systems represented by a strong conflict management climate. Perceived financial resources did not predict the existence of such ethical infrastructure. Organizational size predicted the existence of policies and having training against bullying.

Practical implications

This study informs practitioners about organizational resources associated with organization having a well-developed ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying. A high level of high-quality HRM practices seems to be more important for the existence of a well-developed ethical infrastructure against workplace bullying compared to financial resources and organizational size, at least as perceived by HR managers and HSRs.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence for the importance of having a high level of high-quality HRM practices as predictors of the existence of ethical infrastructure to tackle workplace bullying. An essential finding is that the existence of such an infrastructure is not dependent on distal resources, such as organizational size and perceived financial resources.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Learning Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-431-9

Abstract

Details

Critical Capabilities and Competencies for Knowledge Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-767-7

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2009

Denise Whitehouse

This article explores the little understood practice of school interior design and the manner in which school interiors give form to ideas about what the work of children…

Abstract

This article explores the little understood practice of school interior design and the manner in which school interiors give form to ideas about what the work of children and teachers could and should look like. Its focus is a perceived link between the concepts of school work made material in the design of new twenty‐first century learning environments and those expressed in the design of Modernist progressive schools such as Richard Neutra’s Corona Ave, Elementary School, California. The article’s impetus comes from current interest in the inter‐relationship between the design of physical learning environments and pedagogy reform as governments in Australia and internationally, work to transform teaching and learning practices through innovative school building and refurbishment projects. Government campaigns, for example the UK’s Schools for the Future Program and Australia’s Victorian Schools Plan, use a promotional rhetoric that calls for the final dismantling of the cellular classroom with its industrial model of work so that ‘different pedagogical approaches and the different ways that children learn [can] be represented in the design of new learning environments’, in buildings and interiors designed to support contemporary constructivist‐inspired pedagogies.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Mitch Blair and Denise Alexander

Equity is an issue that pervades all aspects of primary care provision for children and as such is a recurring theme in the Models of Child Health Appraised project. All…

Abstract

Equity is an issue that pervades all aspects of primary care provision for children and as such is a recurring theme in the Models of Child Health Appraised project. All European Union member states agree to address inequalities in health outcomes and include policies to address the gradient of health across society and target particularly vulnerable population groups. The project sought to understand the contribution of primary care services to reducing inequity in health outcomes for children. We focused on some key features of inequity as they affect children, such as the importance of good health services in early childhood, and the effects of inequity on children, such as the higher health needs of underprivileged groups, but their generally lower access to health services. This indicates that health services have an important role in buffering the effects of social determinants of health by providing effective treatment that can improve the health and quality of life for children with chronic disorders. We identified common risk factors for inequity, such as gender, family situation, socio-economic status (SES), migrant or minority status and regional differences in healthcare provision, and attempted to measure inequity of service provision. We did this by analysing routine data of universal primary care procedures, such as vaccination, age at diagnosis of autism or emergency hospital admission for conditions that can be generally treated in primary care, against variables of inequity, such as indicators of SES, migrant/ethnicity or urban/rural residency. In addition, we focused on the experiences of child population groups particularly at risk of inequity of primary care provision: migrant children and children in the state care system.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

Keywords

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