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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Arthur Kearney, Denis Harrington and Tazeeb Rajwani

Using a state of the art CIMO literature review the paper develops a framework of the relationship between strategy making in the small tourism firm context and four…

Abstract

Purpose

Using a state of the art CIMO literature review the paper develops a framework of the relationship between strategy making in the small tourism firm context and four performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the CIMO literature review method, adapted from the wider management literature to structure and integrate the existing fragmented literature base.

Findings

Premised on the literature review, a framework of the relationship between strategy making and firm performance in context is posited. Emerging from a dominant owner/manager in a deeply embedded context strategy making influences firm performance across four dimensions. The influence is dynamic, continually subject to modification in a changing environment often mediated through emerging technology.

Research limitations/implications

The CIMO method provides an integrated framework of the relationship between strategy making and small firm performance in context hence overcoming limitations of the fragmented nature of the research landscape. Emerging from the review key future research trajectories is posited.

Practical implications

While highlighting the relationship between strategy making and performance, the proposed framework implies owner/managers play the key role in strategy making with opportunities and challenges in modifying existing strategy making emerging from owner/manager embeddedness. Opportunities for improved policy interventions are posited.

Originality/value

The paper applies the systematic review to the relationship between strategy making and the small tourism firm.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Mary Keating and Denis Harrington

This paper reviews the literature on the implementation of quality programs in the Irish hotel industry. Through a review of the literature in service quality…

Abstract

This paper reviews the literature on the implementation of quality programs in the Irish hotel industry. Through a review of the literature in service quality, empowerment, and strategy implementation, key issues that affect the achievement of quality are identified. Many quality programs fail from lack of commitment on the part of senior management, middle management, and front‐line employees. Quality management is focused on involvement, communication, and teamwork; but studies show that the management of quality in contemporary hospitality organisations is lacking in these dimensions. The integrative nature of the European Foundation for Quality Management model for business excellence might provide a useful framework for quality implementation in Irish hotels, and it is concluded that further research should be conducted to consider the potential of such frameworks in an Irish context.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Sinead Mellett, Felicity Kelliher and Denis Harrington

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate key criteria underpinning network-facilitated green innovation capability development in micro-firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate key criteria underpinning network-facilitated green innovation capability development in micro-firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Micro-firms, those firms with less than ten full-time employees, need to continuously innovate in order to sustain their business in the emerging green economy. This study uses an interpretive multiple case approach to explore micro-firm owner-manager (O/M) green innovation activities, encompassing O/M views on facilitated network engagement in Ireland and Canada over a 12-month period.

Findings

The findings show that proactive implementation of green innovation is influenced by the O/M’s natural environment orientation and the potential for economic gain, while facilitated networks provide an additional resource that the O/M can draw from that allows the O/M to test new ideas, comprehend new and existing legislation and identify potential supports in pursuit of green innovation capability development within the micro-firm.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers a contribution to knowledge in the areas of green innovation, micro-firm capabilities and facilitated network engagement. However, the sample size is small and distance was a challenge, yet data and case protocols are in place which allow for replication of the study. As the research is embedded in the resource and capability theories, alternative theoretical frameworks may shed a different light on the research question.

Originality/value

Prior studies have found that facilitated networks have a positive impact on micro-firm sustainability as these networks enhance the firm’s constrained resource base. The proposed framework can be used as a guideline for support organisations including facilitated networks in assisting micro-firms in reaching their green innovation goals and objectives. It can also be used by micro-firms in the attainment of the green innovation capability.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Kay Ennis and Denis Harrington

Hospitals and healthcare institutions are today clamouring to find ways to ensure that their organisations will become more efficient and cost effective. With TQM defined…

Abstract

Hospitals and healthcare institutions are today clamouring to find ways to ensure that their organisations will become more efficient and cost effective. With TQM defined as managing the entire organisation so that it excels in all dimensions of the services that are important to its customers, it appears to be the solution to the challenge that many hospitals are faced with. This article presents the findings from a quantitative research study focusing on the factors surrounding quality implementation in the Irish healthcare sector and is part of a larger research project.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Kay Downey‐Ennis and Denis Harrington

The effective management of health services and the delivery of quality systems in Irish health‐care institutions have increased in significance in recent years. Consumers…

Abstract

The effective management of health services and the delivery of quality systems in Irish health‐care institutions have increased in significance in recent years. Consumers (patients) are expecting more of health‐care providers and are demanding higher standards of care and service. Simultaneously, those paying for health services have become more concerned about rising health costs and possible inefficiencies. As a result there is widespread interest in understanding what makes for an effective health service and in developing better practices to improve existing approaches to health‐care management and delivery. Reviews developments in quality‐service management in the Irish health‐care sector and focuses attention on the need for the development of a model for quality implementation in health‐care institutions.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Louise Doyle, Felicity Kelliher and Denis Harrington

This study explores how individual, dyad and team levels of learning interact in public healthcare medical teams.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores how individual, dyad and team levels of learning interact in public healthcare medical teams.

Design/methodology/approach

A single interpretive case study is carried out in the public Health Service Executive (HSE) in Ireland, involving three rounds of semi-structured interviews with non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs), supported by relevant professional documentation and researcher log entries.

Findings

An experience hierarchy, interpersonal relationships and social dynamics form the backdrop to learning interactions within public healthcare medical teams. Individual and team learning primarily occur in informal settings where interpreting and developing understanding takes place either in dyads, small groups or with the whole team. NCHD learning may vary depending on how effectively they build interpersonal relationships, take advantage of informal learning opportunities and manage the social dynamics within their team. Willingness and confidence to share insights and asking questions are triggers for individual and team learning.

Research limitations/implications

As a single case study focused on the HSE NCHD individual and team learning experience, this research study represents a relatively small exploration of individual and team learning interplay in the public healthcare medical team environment. The development of learning theory in this domain presents an intriguing avenue of further research, including observation of interactions within a team.

Practical implications

The findings have practical relevance to those who are interested in the effectiveness of post-graduate/ NCHD learning in the public healthcare system. Interpersonal relationships and social norms play strong roles in how interaction and learning occurs in a team. These findings highlight the challenge of ensuring consistent quality across individual NCHDs or across hospital sites when training is heavily influenced by the approach of senior colleagues/ consultants to their more junior colleagues and the degree to which they take an active interest in NCHD learning.

Originality/value

The proposed learning framework is a key theoretical contribution, which draws upon the multi-levels of learning and provides greater insight into how individual, dyad and team learning interact in public healthcare medical teams when managing patient care. The findings have practical relevance in how to facilitate effective teamwork and learning interactions and for those who are interested in the consistency and quality of the training experience for NCHDs.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Felicity Kelliher, Monica Murphy and Denis Harrington

This paper explores the role of goal setting and external accountability mechanisms in embedding strategic learning plans in small firms. The research question asks, does…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the role of goal setting and external accountability mechanisms in embedding strategic learning plans in small firms. The research question asks, does an external learning intervention influence how strategic learning plans are embedded in small firms?

Design/methodology/approach

Insights from in-depth action research carried out with three small firm owner-managers (OMs) inform the study.

Findings

Findings present valuable insights into how small firms learn strategically, and the link between OM goal setting and external accountability mechanisms in pursuit of embedded learning. A framework for embedding strategic learning plans in small firms is presented.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers a contribution to knowledge in the areas of small firm learning, strategic planning and social learning theory. While the sample size is small, data and case protocols are in place which allow for replication of the study. As the research is embedded in social learning theory, alternative theoretical frameworks may shed a different light on the research question.

Practical implications

The study will be of interest to practitioners working in the design, development, delivery and evaluation of learning interventions for small service firms. Given the importance of the small firm sector to the global economy, the research may also be of interest to government agencies, who strive to protect the survival and growth of small firms generally and who set aside resource amounts each year to fund training programmes for small firm OMs.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the body of existing knowledge in the small firm setting concerning social learning theory and small firm learning strategies. It has identified a link between OM goal setting and external accountability mechanisms in pursuit of sustainable organisational learning in small firms and offers a framework for embedding strategic learning plans in small firms. The study answers calls for a more robust framework to advance understanding of how OMs learn and whether that learning is consequently embedded in the organisation. The proposed framework can be used as a guideline for support organisations in assisting small firms in reaching their learning potential. It can also be used by small firms in the attainment of strategy learning capability.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Felicity Kelliher, Monica Murphy and Denis Harrington

This paper explores the role of goal setting and external accountability mechanisms in embedding strategic learning plans in small firms. The research question asks, how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the role of goal setting and external accountability mechanisms in embedding strategic learning plans in small firms. The research question asks, how are strategic learning plans embedded in small firms?

Design/methodology/approach

Insights from in-depth action research carried out with three small firm owner-managers (OMs) inform the study.

Findings

Findings present valuable insights into how small firms learn strategically, and the link between OM goal setting and external accountability mechanisms in pursuit of embedded learning. A framework for embedding strategic learning plans in small firms is presented.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers a contribution to knowledge in the areas of small firm learning, strategic planning and social learning theory. While the sample size is small, data and case protocols are in place which allow for replication of the study. As the research is embedded in social learning theory, alternative theoretical frameworks may shed a different light on the research question.

Practical implications

The study may be of interest to practitioners working in the design, development, delivery and evaluation of learning interventions for small service firms. Given the importance of the small firm sector to the global economy, the research may also be of interest to government agencies, who strive to protect the survival and growth of small firms generally and who set aside resource amounts each year to fund training programmes for small firm OMs.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the body of existing knowledge in the small firm setting concerning social learning theory and small firm learning strategies. It has identified a link between OM goal setting and external accountability mechanisms in pursuit of sustainable organisational learning in small firms and offers a framework for embedding strategic learning plans in small firms. The study answers calls for a more robust framework to advance understanding of how OMs learn and whether that learning is consequently embedded in the organisation. The proposed framework can be used as a guideline for support organisations in assisting small firms in reaching their learning potential. It can also be used by small firms in the attainment of strategy learning capability.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2020

Marie Gubbins, Denis Harrington and Peter Hines

The purpose of this paper is to draw on literature underpinning social support to explore individual level considerations when designing social support systems for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on literature underpinning social support to explore individual level considerations when designing social support systems for academic entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from literature in the fields of entrepreneurship, organisational support, stress and coping, and conservation of resources theory to conceptualise social support in an academic entrepreneurship setting.

Findings

Provides an expanded definition and a framework of social support. The definition signals the complex nature of delivering social support by considering mechanisms through which the concept is operationalised. These include the content of social support, relationships it occurs within, mode of delivery of support and finally outcomes of such support. A social support influencer pentagram is presented of elements that, together, or separately may affect how individuals seek, receive or perceive support in the academic entrepreneurship context. The framework may also have implications for organisations in other contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should explore the content, delivery mode and timing of support sought and/or received and perceived as helpful and the types of relationships within which these might occur. The impact of this on academic entrepreneurship and variation of these inputs and outputs with respect to the types of actors involved should be considered. It underscores the need, in empirical research, for in-depth understanding of the context of each incident of support regardless of organisational context.

Practical implications

This paper illustrates the challenges of designing a supportive culture and the conceptual contribution forewarns policy makers of the need to design multi-faceted, flexible and adaptive social support systems.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to establish the value and complex nature of social support as a medium to encourage academic entrepreneurship by providing a broader definition of social support and a framework of elements that may affect whether individuals seek, receive or perceive support within the academic entrepreneurship setting. To our knowledge, it is one of the first papers in an academic entrepreneurship setting which recognises the dual separate paths [based on stress and coping theory (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984) and conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989)] from the perception of support and the objective support itself to entrepreneurial outcomes. The proposed framework also seeks to contribute to a greater understanding of the ways in which social systems might influence the success of an individual academic’s entrepreneurial endeavours and those of others with whom they interact. It also contributes to the wider social support literature by providing a better understanding of how individuals might break resource loss spirals (Hobfoll et al., 2018).

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2020

Aidan P. Walsh, Denis Harrington and Peter Hines

Hospital organisations are currently experiencing significant challenges that have encouraged a move towards a value-based approach to health care. However, such a…

Abstract

Purpose

Hospital organisations are currently experiencing significant challenges that have encouraged a move towards a value-based approach to health care. However, such a transition requires understanding the underlying competencies required to enable such a focus. This paper aims to undertake a systematic review of the available literature on managerial competencies in hospitals and considers these in a value-based health-care context.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was conducted to identify research studies that describe the characteristics of management competence in hospital environments.

Findings

Categories and sub-categories of management competence in hospitals were identified and considered in a value-based health-care context.

Research limitations/implications

The systematic literature review identifies a need for further research regarding managerial competencies of managers of hospitals. Competencies for managing in a value-based health-care model also require deeper investigation.

Practical implications

The categories of management competence provide guidance to organisations transitioning towards value-based health care in terms of identifying and developing management competencies. Hospitals should consider the development of a competency model that includes broader categories of competencies than purely clinical or professional competencies.

Originality/value

This study builds upon and advances previous reviews of management competence in hospitals, and the competency categories presented can be used as a basis to identify management competency requirements in hospitals.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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