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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2018

Kodjo Atiso, Jenna Kammer and Denice Adkins

This study aims to examine the information needs of Ghanaian immigrants who have settled in Maryland in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the information needs of Ghanaian immigrants who have settled in Maryland in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an ethnographic approach, immigrants from Ghana shared their information needs, challenges and sources they rely upon for information. In total, 50 Ghanaian immigrants participated in this study.

Findings

Findings indicate that like many immigrant populations, Ghanaians who have immigrated to the USA primarily rely on personal networks, mediated through social media, as their primary sources of information. Despite the availability of immigration resources in the library, Ghanaian immigrants may not view it as a useful resource.

Social implications

While this study examines a single immigrant population, its social implications are important to libraries who aim to serve immigrant populations in their community.

Originality/value

This study provides new information about African immigrant population, a population whose information needs have rarely been covered in the literature.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Denice Adkins

This chapter provides a review of diversity management as framed in business and organizational management literature, and relates that literature to the current state of…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides a review of diversity management as framed in business and organizational management literature, and relates that literature to the current state of diversity theory development in library and information science (LIS).

Methodology/approach

This review begins with a theoretical orientation, focusing on organizational theories, diversity management models, and diversity conflict frameworks. It then summarizes some empirical literature for organizations seeking to create a diverse environment. It concludes with a discussion of diversity models developed in and for LIS.

Findings

Library and information science has lagged behind organizational science in research and theory development related to diversity. Most of the LIS research that has been done has focused on individuals rather than library systems or the larger organizational systems in which they are embedded. Practical questions are raised about the extent of diversity concerns in the day-to-day operations and practices of libraries, and where diversity concerns come into conflict with librarians’ professional values.

Details

Celebrating the James Partridge Award: Essays Toward the Development of a More Diverse, Inclusive, and Equitable Field of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-933-9

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Musa Wakhungu Olaka and Denice Adkins

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Kenyan academic librarians, with varying education levels, solve and handle copyright issues when presented to them by library users.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how Kenyan academic librarians, with varying education levels, solve and handle copyright issues when presented to them by library users.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was administered to 253 librarians in 14 universities in Nairobi, Kenya. Of those who responded to the survey, a think aloud protocol and critical incident technique interview were administered to a convenience sample of 32 librarians.

Findings

Learned helplessness was found to exist among librarians who were Certificate and Diploma holders when faced with copyright queries. Librarians from the different education levels differed in their ranking of problem‐solving strategies they employ when it comes to stopping copyright infringement in libraries.

Practical implications

This study helps to inform internal library policies regarding copyright and the type of staff member a library can utilize to serve library users whenever they present queries on copyright issues. The study supports the need for thorough copyright education for librarians.

Originality/value

This is the first time that a study has tried to compare how academic librarians in Africa with varying education levels in Library Science respond to copyright queries presented to them and approaches they use to fight copyright infringement.

Details

Library Review, vol. 62 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Anne M. Dannerbeck Janku, Jenny Bossaller, Denice Adkins and Rachel Thudium

Drug Treatment Courts (DTCs) offer a form of alternative sentencing for people who have been convicted of a crime related to drug or alcohol abuse. The work of…

Abstract

Drug Treatment Courts (DTCs) offer a form of alternative sentencing for people who have been convicted of a crime related to drug or alcohol abuse. The work of rehabilitation in DTCs is client-centered, meaning that it takes into account all of the client’s needs that affect their life in regards to completion of the program and rehabilitation. DTCs employ teams of people made up of judges, lawyers, educators, clinicians, and community supervisors. There are specific ways that librarians might become involved with DTCs regarding both literacy and, more specifically, health literacy. Existing programs could be adapted to solve common health literacy problems of participants, and librarians could also forge relationships with DTCs. Training for librarians should include education about the health and literacy problems faced by this population so they can successfully connect DTC participants with people and information that will contribute to their success completing the program and building healthier lives. This chapter looks to established best practices within DTCs and to some current related programs within public libraries to find grounds for expanding services to this population.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Diane L. Barlow and Paul T. Jaeger

This chapter introduces the roles and challenges of diversity and inclusion in library and information science, as well as the goals and efforts to promote diversity and…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter introduces the roles and challenges of diversity and inclusion in library and information science, as well as the goals and efforts to promote diversity and inclusion such as the James Partridge Outstanding African American Information Professional Award.

Methodology/approach

This chapter begins with a brief review of the issues of race and other forms of diversity in the field and the importance of addressing them. After articulating the need for this volume, the chapter introduces the sections of the book: The James Partridge Award and Other Efforts in Higher Education; Equitable Service to All; Toward a More Inclusive and Supportive Profession; Intersections of Race and Other Forms of Diversity; and Conclusions.

Findings

This chapter introduces a book that explores the historical and current issues related to diversity, inclusion, and equity in library and information science professions, professional organizations, institutions, education, and scholarship from a range of first-hand perspectives of winners of the James Partridge Award and other scholars and professionals.

Details

Celebrating the James Partridge Award: Essays Toward the Development of a More Diverse, Inclusive, and Equitable Field of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-933-9

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Beth St. Jean, Paul T. Jaeger, Gagan Jindal and Yuting Liao

This chapter introduces the focus of this volume – the many ways in which libraries and librarians are helping to increase people’s health literacy and reduce health…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the focus of this volume – the many ways in which libraries and librarians are helping to increase people’s health literacy and reduce health disparities in their communities. The rampant and rapidly increasing health injustices that occur every day throughout the world are, in large part, caused and exacerbated by health information injustice – something which libraries and librarians are playing an instrumental role in addressing by ensuring the physical and intellectual accessibility of information for all. This chapter opens with an introduction to the central concepts of health justice and health information injustice, focusing on the many information-related factors that shape the degree to which individuals have the information they need to be able to have a sufficient and truly equitable chance to live a long and healthy life. Next, the authors present a timely case study to emphasize the importance of health information justice, looking at the dire importance of health literacy as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors then provide a brief glimpse into their 13 contributed chapters, grouped into five categories: (1) Public Libraries/Healthy Communities; (2) Health Information Assessment; (3) Overcoming Barriers to Health Information Access; (4) Serving Disadvantaged Populations; and (5) Health Information as a Communal Asset. In conclusion, the authors discuss their aims for this volume, particularly that readers will become more aware of librarians’ efforts to address health disparities in their communities and excited about participating in and expanding these efforts, moving us closer to health justice.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Celebrating the James Partridge Award: Essays Toward the Development of a More Diverse, Inclusive, and Equitable Field of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-933-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Keren Dali

Drawing on the survey of Spanish-speaking immigrant and migrant readers in Canada and the US, this study pursues three goals: (1) examine the image of the library held by…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the survey of Spanish-speaking immigrant and migrant readers in Canada and the US, this study pursues three goals: (1) examine the image of the library held by these readers and trace the change of this image after the international migration; (2) use the study findings to revise and update the currently existing typologies of the image of the library; and (3) understand ethical and effective research practices in the studies of immigrant/migrant communities whereby researchers are external to communities in question.

Design/methodology/approach

The data about immigrant/migrant readers were collected through a self-administered survey questionnaire that was available both in print and electronically, both in Spanish and English. The data analysis was guided by hermeneutic phenomenology, as explicated in the article. Theoretical examination of the image of the library relied on the earlier typology developed by V. Stelmakh.

Findings

The study elucidates perceptions of libraries and librarians in both North America and countries of origin held by Spanish-speaking immigrant/migrant readers, and highlights changes that occur in the image of the library as readers move across geographic borders. Building on the empirical data, the article develops a new typology of the image of the library. It also offers insight into ethical and effective ways of engaging with immigrant communities that should be upheld by researchers from outside the communities in question.

Originality/value

It is the first known study that systematically traces the changes in the image of the library which occur alongside geographic and sociocultural migrations. It is also the first known study that focuses specifically on readers rather than library users in general. The new typology consists of four different elements – the cultural image; the functional image; the humanistic image; and the ideological image of the library – and is accompanied by detailed definitions of each.

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