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Article

James L. Price

Proposes a role for demographic variables in the study ofabsenteeism and turnover. After distinguishing demographic variables andtheoretical variables, reviews…

Abstract

Proposes a role for demographic variables in the study of absenteeism and turnover. After distinguishing demographic variables and theoretical variables, reviews inappropriate and appropriate uses of demographic variables in current research on absenteeism and turnover. Advances the argument that there are two inappropriate uses of these variables in current research, as variables in causal models and as measures. Also argues that these variables can appropriately be used in the construction of models and in the management of organizations. Demographic variables are assigned a considerably restricted but important role in the study of absenteeism and turnover. Examines absenteeism and turnover, because they are important social processes in organizations.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

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Book part

Ray Reagans

A number of scholars have called our attention to the need to consider the social significance of demographic categories when evaluating the association between a team's…

Abstract

A number of scholars have called our attention to the need to consider the social significance of demographic categories when evaluating the association between a team's composition and its performance. Implicit in the call is the idea that the association between a team's composition and its performance is more predictable when the demographic categories that define the team's composition are more significant. How to define the social significance of a demographic category is unclear. One approach is to define the importance of a demographic category in terms of interpersonal attraction. Important demographic categories generate more positive affect between category members. Alternatively, one could define the social significance of a demographic category in the context of task-related processes and activities. A demographic category is significant if it affects the activities that are more likely to be assigned to a team member (i.e., an individual's work-set). I maintain there is much to gain by adopting a role-based approach to the question. An attraction-based approach is a subset of a role-based approach. Moreover, an empirical analysis of the association between demographic categories and job categories would allow us to uncover how categorical people are in their thinking and therefore how socially significant different demographic categories are at work. When combined with a team's demographic composition and the activities that a team must accomplish, the empirical results would move us one step closer to predicting a team's success rate a priori.

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Diversity and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-053-7

Abstract

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Population Change, Labor Markets and Sustainable Growth: Towards a New Economic Paradigm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-051-6

Abstract

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Population Change, Labor Markets and Sustainable Growth: Towards a New Economic Paradigm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-051-6

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Book part

Sandra E Spataro

This chapter proposes a model of person-situation interactions to explain when individuals react to demographic diversity in their work places. Qualitative research…

Abstract

This chapter proposes a model of person-situation interactions to explain when individuals react to demographic diversity in their work places. Qualitative research reported here suggests individual identities likely influence reactions to diversity and should be considered in conjunction with traditional situational factors. The model developed from this research looks at interactions between high and low identification with demographic categories and strong and weak situational cues toward such categories to explain when individuals are most likely to respond (or not respond) to diversity. The proposition that motivated reactions to diversity are observable only when both situational and personal factors contribute is advanced.

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Identity Issues in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-168-2

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Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-570-8

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Article

Mohammad Ali Ashraf

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of demographic factors on employee compensation, job satisfaction and organizational commitment in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of demographic factors on employee compensation, job satisfaction and organizational commitment in private higher educational institutes in Bangladesh. Specifically, how do compensation structure and job satisfaction mediate in the link between demographic factors and organizational commitment? To answer this question, a theoretical framework using the theory of employee retention provided by Martin and Kaufman, as its basis was established.

Design/methodology/approach

Data (n = 515) were collected from faculty members of the private universities in Bangladesh. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Findings indicate that though demographic factors have no direct impact on organizational commitment, they have indirect impacts on organizational commitment through the mediation of compensation structure and faculty job satisfaction. Besides, compensation structure also has a significant mediating role in the link between demographic structure and faculty job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

One possible drawback is the number of private universities from which the data were collected. In the sample used here, only 20 private universities were selected to conduct the survey. Besides, the study could not include public universities that are also a significant part and parcel of higher education in the country. So, if more private and public universities were taken into consideration to collect the data, the results might be improved. Thus, the usual cautions about overgeneralizing findings from this sample, to populations for which it is not strictly representative, apply.

Practical implications

From a practical perspective, as a cumulative body of work on organizational commitment, we will be better able to advise policymakers and educators on the elements they need to address to increase the longer engagement of the faculty members in their institutes. In this study, the one area of findings that may help policymakers and educators the most concerns compensation package that affects job satisfaction and organizational commitment. We found that demographic factors and compensation packages are the most important factors for the faculty members to impact on organizational commitment in this study.

Social implications

The social implication is that policymakers of the private universities can focus on fair justice in terms of demographic factors and compensation package for job satisfaction, motivation and organizational commitment of the faculty members in their universities.

Originality/value

The findings of the study are important for the policymakers of the higher education institutes.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article

Kashif Munir and Faqeer Syed Umaid Shahid

This study examines the long-run and short-run impact of demographic factors, i.e. life expectancy, fertility rate and young dependency ratio in determining the economic…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the long-run and short-run impact of demographic factors, i.e. life expectancy, fertility rate and young dependency ratio in determining the economic growth of South Asian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical foundation of the study relies on demographic transition theory and incorporates life expectancy, fertility rate and young dependency ratio into the production function by means of human capital component. The study uses annual panel data of four South Asian courtiers, i.e. Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka from 1980 to 2018 and utilizes panel ARDL model to analyze the long run and short run impact of demographic factors on economic growth.

Findings

Results show that real stock of capital, fertility rate and life expectancy are positively related with economic growth, while an increase in young dependency ratio reduces economic growth in South Asian countries in the long run. Short-run dynamics show that real stock of capital and life expectancy have insignificant impact on economic growth, while young dependency ratio has negative and significant as well as life expectancy has positive and significant impact on economic growth in South Asian countries. Unidirectional causality exists from young dependency ratio and fertility rate to GDP per capita in the short run.

Practical implications

Government has to design policies for better health and education facilities to yield high economic growth as well as better infrastructure and macroeconomic stability to facilitate capital accumulation in the region to foster economic growth.

Originality/value

This study considerably adds into the existing literature by providing better understanding of various demographic aspects and their economic inference by highlighting the demographic changes that South Asia has endured. This study is also beneficial for policymakers and growth analysts in generating effective and sustainable policies regarding population dynamics and economic development of the region.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article

Sadia Mansoor, Erica French and Muhammad Ali

A narrow focus of past diversity research and inconsistent findings have contributed to a lack of understanding of how to manage diversity for positive outcomes. Focusing…

Abstract

Purpose

A narrow focus of past diversity research and inconsistent findings have contributed to a lack of understanding of how to manage diversity for positive outcomes. Focusing on age, gender and ethnic diversity, this paper aims to review literature on group objective demographic diversity and individual perceived demographic diversity to present an integrated multilevel framework for our improved understanding and to present testable propositions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a thorough review of 51 empirical studies of demographic diversity at individual and group levels to propose a multilevel framework.

Findings

Drawing on information elaboration theory, social categorization theory and social identity theory, an integrated multilevel framework is proposed at individual and group levels. The framework suggests that demographic diversity (age, gender and ethnicity) aids positive information elaboration processes, while also causing negative social categorization processes. These processes impact individual and group outcomes. The framework also identifies moderating factors not sufficiently addressed in the demographic diversity literature. Propositions and implications for future research in the field of demographic diversity are presented.

Originality/value

This review provides an integrated multilevel framework of objective and perceived demographic diversity and its positive and negative processes and effects at both individual and group levels, drawn from information elaboration, social categorization and social identity theories.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article

James Rajasekar, Ahmed Al-Asfour and Efrem Kentiba

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between cultural intelligence (CQ) and adult demographic profiles in the workplace.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between cultural intelligence (CQ) and adult demographic profiles in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-cultural study used a self-reported demographic and a 20-item CQ scale. The demographic and CQ level of 287 adults working in Oman from different countries was evaluated.

Findings

The mean total CQ score of adults working in Oman was 4.77 + 1.53. Out of the four dimensions, this study founds higher values relating to motivational CQ followed by metacognitive and behavioral CQ with mean scores 5.22 + 1.53, 5.13 + 1.57 and 4.59 + 1.54, respectively. Significance, between-group differences (gender, age, job level, sector type, education level, nationality and study abroad), were observed in metacognitive and motivational dimensions of CQ (p < 0.001). All the regression models are significant, indicating that they express a meaningful relationship between each of the dependent variables and the variables in the model. The total CQ model explains 10.7% of the variance.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study provide additional insight to researchers in identifying the demographic profiles which predict the level of total CQ. The use of a longitudinal design to further confirm the results of this study is proposed.

Practical implications

The study helps practicing managers to understand the implications of cultural Intelligence and how it influences employee behavior from the perspectives of demographic perspectives.

Originality/value

The CQ levels of adults working in Oman vary according to their demographic profiles and the demographic profiles predict the CQ levels.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

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