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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

James L. Price

Proposes a role for demographic variables in the study ofabsenteeism and turnover. After distinguishing demographic variables andtheoretical variables, reviews…

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Abstract

Proposes a role for demographic variables in the study of absenteeism and turnover. After distinguishing demographic variables and theoretical variables, reviews inappropriate and appropriate uses of demographic variables in current research on absenteeism and turnover. Advances the argument that there are two inappropriate uses of these variables in current research, as variables in causal models and as measures. Also argues that these variables can appropriately be used in the construction of models and in the management of organizations. Demographic variables are assigned a considerably restricted but important role in the study of absenteeism and turnover. Examines absenteeism and turnover, because they are important social processes in organizations.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Ray Reagans

A number of scholars have called our attention to the need to consider the social significance of demographic categories when evaluating the association between a team's…

Abstract

A number of scholars have called our attention to the need to consider the social significance of demographic categories when evaluating the association between a team's composition and its performance. Implicit in the call is the idea that the association between a team's composition and its performance is more predictable when the demographic categories that define the team's composition are more significant. How to define the social significance of a demographic category is unclear. One approach is to define the importance of a demographic category in terms of interpersonal attraction. Important demographic categories generate more positive affect between category members. Alternatively, one could define the social significance of a demographic category in the context of task-related processes and activities. A demographic category is significant if it affects the activities that are more likely to be assigned to a team member (i.e., an individual's work-set). I maintain there is much to gain by adopting a role-based approach to the question. An attraction-based approach is a subset of a role-based approach. Moreover, an empirical analysis of the association between demographic categories and job categories would allow us to uncover how categorical people are in their thinking and therefore how socially significant different demographic categories are at work. When combined with a team's demographic composition and the activities that a team must accomplish, the empirical results would move us one step closer to predicting a team's success rate a priori.

Details

Diversity and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-053-7

Abstract

Details

Population Change, Labor Markets and Sustainable Growth: Towards a New Economic Paradigm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-051-6

Abstract

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Population Change, Labor Markets and Sustainable Growth: Towards a New Economic Paradigm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-051-6

Book part
Publication date: 21 March 2003

Sandra E Spataro

This chapter proposes a model of person-situation interactions to explain when individuals react to demographic diversity in their work places. Qualitative research…

Abstract

This chapter proposes a model of person-situation interactions to explain when individuals react to demographic diversity in their work places. Qualitative research reported here suggests individual identities likely influence reactions to diversity and should be considered in conjunction with traditional situational factors. The model developed from this research looks at interactions between high and low identification with demographic categories and strong and weak situational cues toward such categories to explain when individuals are most likely to respond (or not respond) to diversity. The proposition that motivated reactions to diversity are observable only when both situational and personal factors contribute is advanced.

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Identity Issues in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-168-2

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Carl Mason

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-570-8

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Qing Xie, Wuwei Li and Yuanyuan Zhang

This study empirically examines the curvilinear relationship between top management team task-related demographic faultlines and over-investment, as well as how…

Abstract

Purpose

This study empirically examines the curvilinear relationship between top management team task-related demographic faultlines and over-investment, as well as how biodemographic faultlines and industrial environment moderate the curvilinear relationship between task-related demographic faultlines and over-investment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study designs the panel data from the listed companies of China's growth enterprises board (GEB) (set up by Shenzhen Stock Exchange in 2009) in the period 2011–2016 and uses hierarchical regression analysis and grouping regression analysis in exploring the curvilinear relationship with the variables involved.

Findings

The study provides empirical insights into the relationship on top management team (TMT) task-related demographic faultlines and over-investment, as well as how biodemographic faultlines and industrial environment moderate the relationship between task-related demographic faultlines and over-investment. It suggests that the relationship between task-related demographic faultlines and over-investment is significantly inverted-U. Furthermore, biodemographic faultlines and industrial environment can strengthen the inverted-U relationship between TMT task-related demographic faultlines and over-investment.

Research limitations/implications

The study investigates the influence of task-related demographic faultlines on firm over-investment. The sample is restricted to the listed companies on GEM in China and limited in size. It is also not concerned with the cross-culture contrastive analysis between the Chinese- and Western-listed companies.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that strong/weak TMT task-related demographic faultlines is beneficial in promoting rational investment, but medium TMT task-related demographic faultlines may lead to over-investment.

Originality/value

The study within the crossed-categorization theory, the study provides a contemporary research path by moderating biodemographic faultlines and industrial environments to explain the long-ignored impact of TMT faultlines within a new perspective of firm investment efficiency with a recent significant sample of new emerging countries (e.g. China).

Details

Management Decision, vol. 60 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Mohammad Ali Ashraf

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of demographic factors on employee compensation, job satisfaction and organizational commitment in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of demographic factors on employee compensation, job satisfaction and organizational commitment in private higher educational institutes in Bangladesh. Specifically, how do compensation structure and job satisfaction mediate in the link between demographic factors and organizational commitment? To answer this question, a theoretical framework using the theory of employee retention provided by Martin and Kaufman, as its basis was established.

Design/methodology/approach

Data (n = 515) were collected from faculty members of the private universities in Bangladesh. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Findings indicate that though demographic factors have no direct impact on organizational commitment, they have indirect impacts on organizational commitment through the mediation of compensation structure and faculty job satisfaction. Besides, compensation structure also has a significant mediating role in the link between demographic structure and faculty job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

One possible drawback is the number of private universities from which the data were collected. In the sample used here, only 20 private universities were selected to conduct the survey. Besides, the study could not include public universities that are also a significant part and parcel of higher education in the country. So, if more private and public universities were taken into consideration to collect the data, the results might be improved. Thus, the usual cautions about overgeneralizing findings from this sample, to populations for which it is not strictly representative, apply.

Practical implications

From a practical perspective, as a cumulative body of work on organizational commitment, we will be better able to advise policymakers and educators on the elements they need to address to increase the longer engagement of the faculty members in their institutes. In this study, the one area of findings that may help policymakers and educators the most concerns compensation package that affects job satisfaction and organizational commitment. We found that demographic factors and compensation packages are the most important factors for the faculty members to impact on organizational commitment in this study.

Social implications

The social implication is that policymakers of the private universities can focus on fair justice in terms of demographic factors and compensation package for job satisfaction, motivation and organizational commitment of the faculty members in their universities.

Originality/value

The findings of the study are important for the policymakers of the higher education institutes.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Awinaba Amoah Adongo, Jonathan Mensah Dapaah, Francess Dufie Azumah and John Onzaberigu Nachinaab

Several studies have described health-seeking behaviour within the context of various diseases, the health status and age group. However, knowledge on patient…

Abstract

Purpose

Several studies have described health-seeking behaviour within the context of various diseases, the health status and age group. However, knowledge on patient health-seeking behaviour in the use of public and private hospitals and socio-demographic characteristics in developing countries is still scarce. This paper examines the influence of socio-demographic behavioural variables on health-seeking behaviour and the use of public and private health facilities in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research approach uses the modified SERVQUAL dimension as a data collection tool. Descriptive statistics with Pearson's chi-square test were conducted to determine the relationship between socio-demographic behavioural variables and health-seeking behaviour of patients using public and private hospitals.

Findings

The results showed that there is a significant relationship between the socio-demographic characteristics (sex, marital status, education, level of income) and the health-seeking behaviour of patients in regard to the utilisation of public and private health facilities (p < 0.000).

Originality/value

There is a significant relationship between patients' socio-demographic variables and their choice and utilisation of public and private healthcare services. This information is of value to policy makers so that they have an idea on the socio-demographic behavioural variables that influence patients' health-seeking behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 42 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Nusrat Jafrin, Masnun Mahi, Muhammad Mehedi Masud and Deboshree Ghosh

The study attempts to establish the relationship between demographic dividend and GDP growth rate by utilising panel data from 1990 to 2017 in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan…

Abstract

Purpose

The study attempts to establish the relationship between demographic dividend and GDP growth rate by utilising panel data from 1990 to 2017 in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs the pooled OLS model, using data from the World Bank's database for the period 1990–2017 for five selected South Asia Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) countries.

Findings

The results reveal that demographic dividend affects economic growth in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka and Pakistan, thereby supporting the demographic dividend hypothesis. For the country-specific analysis, it was also observed that demographic dividend impacts the economic growth of the five SAARC countries. In addition, growth of gross capital formation is highly significant for both aggregated and country-specific analyses. However, economic growth is unaffected by trade openness and unemployment rates. Moreover, the rate of labour force participation is negatively related to the GDP growth rate in the aggregated model.

Originality/value

This paper bestows insight into the fact that the impact of demographic dividend on the economic growth of the SAARC regions cannot be fully actualised if the workforce are underutilised. This region needs to adopt appropriate policies to strengthen the considerable benefits of demographic dividend on the economic growth.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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