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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Amy Jayne Eastham and Diane Cox

The purpose of this paper, practice-based mixed methods small-scale study, is to explore the design features of a “dementia friendly” acute ward environment and, staff…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, practice-based mixed methods small-scale study, is to explore the design features of a “dementia friendly” acute ward environment and, staff views on the implications of daily activity engagement for patients with dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight staff members of the multidisciplinary team who work full time on an acute “dementia friendly” ward completed semi-structured questionnaires. Thematic analysis explored responses to the open-ended questions, and a further environmental assessment tool rated features of the “dementia friendly” ward design, on promoting aspects of well-being in patients with dementia.

Findings

Six overarching themes were found. These included: contrasting ward colours; clear ward signage; positive staff interaction; memorabilia, and activity rooms and items, had a positive influence on patient interaction, well-being and engagement in daily activities. The audit scores were rated highly for various aspects of the ward design. These included: the ward design promoting patient interaction, well-being, mobility, orientation, continence, eating and drinking and calm and security.

Research limitations/implications

This practice-based small-scale study highlights the importance that a “dementia friendly” ward environment may have on patient engagement and well-being, from a daily activity perspective. Further research into the key aspects of design that enable meaningful daily activity engagement is required.

Practical implications

This study supports staff perceived views of the positive influence that “dementia friendlydesign may have for patients with dementia. Both the physical design modifications of the ward and staff interaction were highlighted as positively influencing patient well-being, and daily activity engagement. Staff members also felt that they needed to balance the clinical ward priorities, with the contextual requirements of patients with dementia, to establish an effective “dementia friendly” ward.

Originality/value

The value of this research is the combined consideration of an environmental assessment tool and qualitative interviews with members of the multidisciplinary team.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2010

Lynne Mitchell and Elizabeth Burton

This paper summarises research funded by the EPSRC EQUAL programme from 2000 to 2003 to examine how neighbourhoods could be made dementia‐friendly. Design for dementia…

Abstract

This paper summarises research funded by the EPSRC EQUAL programme from 2000 to 2003 to examine how neighbourhoods could be made dementia‐friendly. Design for dementia generally focuses on the internal environment of dementia care homes and facilities, but most people with dementia live at home. Unless they are able to use their local neighbourhoods safely, they are likely to become effectively housebound. There is also increasing awareness of the role the outdoor environment plays in the health, independence, well‐being and cognitive function of people with dementia. The research defined dementia‐friendly neighbourhoods as welcoming, safe, easy and enjoyable for people with dementia and others to access, visit, use and find their around. It identified six design principles: familiarity, legibility, distinctiveness, accessibility, comfort and safety. A number of recommendations for designing and adapting neighbourhoods to be dementia‐friendly arose from the research.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Dimitra Xidous, Tom Grey, Sean P. Kennelly and Desmond O’Neill

This exploratory study stems from research conducted between 2015–2018 focussing on dementia-friendly design (DFD) in hospitals (Grey T. et al. 2018). Specifically, this…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study stems from research conducted between 2015–2018 focussing on dementia-friendly design (DFD) in hospitals (Grey T. et al. 2018). Specifically, this study focusses on facilities management (FM) staff in Irish hospitals to gain a preliminary understanding of the level of knowledge and engagement of FM in the implementation of dementia-friendly hospital (DFH) design.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods approach based on a series of ad hoc semi-structured interviews, and an online survey. The aims were, namely, assess the extent of FM engagement in hospital works; measure the level of awareness regarding DFD; and identify facilitators and barriers to DFD in hospital settings. Participants (74) comprised FM staff in 35 Irish acute care hospitals. The research findings are based on thematic analysis of ad hoc semi-structured interviews (participants, n = 4) and survey responses (participants, n = 13).

Findings

While FM staff reported to possess important knowledge for building DFH, they also mentioned a lack of engagement of FM in design processes and hospital works.

Practical implications

The research has gained insight into the role of FM in promoting a dementia-friendly approach. Lack of or poor engagement of FM in design processes and hospital works means not fully tapping into rich expertise that would be invaluable in the development, implementation and maintenance of DFH. Universal design is a key driver for facilitating their engagement in the design, implementation and maintenance of DFH environments.

Originality/value

This is the first study exploring the role of FM in supporting a DFD approach in acute care hospitals.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Lynne Mitchell and Elizabeth Burton

Design for dementia has, to date, focused on the internal, generally institutional environment of care homes and dementia care facilities. Yet the majority of older people…

Abstract

Design for dementia has, to date, focused on the internal, generally institutional environment of care homes and dementia care facilities. Yet the majority of older people with dementia live at home, around one third of these on their own. Unless outdoor environments are designed to help older people with dementia continue to use their local neighbourhoods they will become effectively housebound. This paper presents the findings of a three‐year research project conducted by the WISE (Wellbeing in Sustainable Environments) research unit of the Oxford Institute for Sustainable Development at Oxford Brookes University. The researchers were funded by the EPSRC EQUAL initiative to examine how the outside environment could be made dementia friendly. This unprecedented research investigated the perceptions, experiences and use of the outdoor environment by older people with dementia and identified design factors that influence their ability to successfully use and negotiate their local neighbourhoods. The research found that dementia‐friendly outdoor environments are places that are familiar, legible, distinctive, accessible, comfortable and safe. The findings have enabled the researchers to provide some preliminary recommendations for designers, at all scales from urban design to the design of street furniture, on the criteria to consider in developing dementia‐friendly urban areas.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Karim Hadjri, Verity Faith and Maria McManus

This study seeks to appraise the design of nursing and residential care homes for people with dementia in Northern Ireland using the design audit checklist developed by…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to appraise the design of nursing and residential care homes for people with dementia in Northern Ireland using the design audit checklist developed by the Dementia Services Development Centre – DSDC.

Design/methodology/approach

The appraisal used postal questionnaires, based on the DSDC essential design criteria, that were sent to facility managers. This was conducted in order to establish the level of compliance with these criteria to achieve a dementia‐friendly home, and to ascertain whether there are any noticeable differences between nursing homes and residential care homes.

Findings

The study identified the types of homes that were seen as failing to meet most of the DSDC design criteria and, in particular, which criteria are not met according to their managers. Results from this sample suggest that nursing homes align better with DSDC criteria than residential care homes. The study concludes that the majority of managers perceive their care homes to meet over 50 percent of the essential criteria, with just over 5 percent below the 50 percent mark.

Research limitations/implications

Given that this study used postal questionnaires more research is needed in order to validate results. Behavioral and policy implications are crucial aspects that will be the subject of future research which will involve post‐occupancy evaluation.

Practical implications

More attention to dementia‐friendly building design needs to be taken into consideration by residential care homes, and more improvement would still be required by nursing homes not meeting all criteria.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of dementia‐friendly building design and the requirements for more care in designing and fitting care environments for people with dementia.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Liam Funnell, Isabel Garriock, Ben Shirley and Tracey Williamson

The purpose of this paper is to understand factors that affect viewing of television news programmes by people living with dementia, and to identify dementia-friendly

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand factors that affect viewing of television news programmes by people living with dementia, and to identify dementia-friendly design principles for television news programmes and factors for personalising object-based media broadcast.

Design/methodology/approach

Extensive public involvement comprising two discussion groups with people with dementia and family carers informed the study design and provided supplementary secondary data. Primary data collection comprised a focus group interview with people with dementia (n=4) and family carers (n=4). Past viewing experiences and perceived barriers and facilitators to viewing television were explored. Participants commented on an array of video clips comprising varying segments of fictional news programmes, plus control versions of each segment.

Findings

Four themes were identified: content (general comments, context, type of media and pace); presenter (body language, clothing and accent); background (location and studio appearance); and technical aspects (graphics, sound, colours, camera, transitions, general issues).

Research limitations/implications

Limitations included a modest sample size which is offset by exemplary public involvement in informing the study design.

Practical implications

Measures ensured research involvement and participation was made accessible to people living with dementia.

Social implications

Participants benefited from sharing views with peers and expressed enhanced wellbeing from knowing their participation could lead to improved television viewing, an important social occupation, for people with dementia in the future.

Originality/value

This study is the first to be published which focusses on dementia-friendly television news programmes.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Lee H. Fisher, David John Edwards, Erika Anneli Pärn and Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa

This paper aims to investigate the impact that building design has upon the quality of life for residents of a care home who have dementia. To present a balanced…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact that building design has upon the quality of life for residents of a care home who have dementia. To present a balanced perspective, carers within the care home also participate in the research.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodological approach was adopted using one care home, ten residents and five staff as a sample frame. During interviews conducted, participants were asked semi-structured questions on how building design features impact upon the quality of life of residents. Questions posed focussed upon key design principles that emerged from a detailed review of extant literature.

Findings

Building design for people with dementia must consider a complex array of features to provide a safe and habitable living space for residents and family members who visit. This living space must also be suitably utilitarian and provide a workable environment for staff. Hence, an appropriate balance between these two competing requirements must be attained, and often a tailor-made solution is required that fits the individual’s level of dementia. Three prominent areas that study participants expressed a desire for were a safe environment; support for wayfinding, orientation and navigation; and access to nature and the outdoors.

Originality/value

The work reports upon the rarely discussed issue of building design for people with dementia and could be used by policymakers and construction firms to enhance their knowledge capabilities in this area. The research concludes with direction for future research which should seek to provide more evidence-based research vis-a-vis perception enquiry and extend this seminal work to a larger sample of care homes or people with dementia living at home.

Details

Facilities, vol. 36 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2019

Alison Bowes and Alison Dawson

Abstract

Details

Designing Environments for People with Dementia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-974-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Efthimia Pantzartzis, Andrew D.F. Price and Federica Pascale

This paper aims to identify costs related to dementia care provision and explore how purpose-built environment investments can help control these costs and improve quality…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify costs related to dementia care provision and explore how purpose-built environment investments can help control these costs and improve quality of life and clinical outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopts a multi-method approach where the findings of a literature review drove the analysis of data obtained from the 115 pilot projects funded by the Department of Health England’s National Dementia Capital Investment Programme.

Findings

Under the UK Government’s new productivity challenge, it is fundamental to identify actions that provide value for money to prioritise policy and practice. This paper identifies healthcare spaces (e.g. bathroom) where the impact of the built environment on healthcare costs are most evident and building elements (e.g. lighting) to which these costs can be directly associated. The paper advocates the development of evidence and decision support tools capable of: linking built environment interventions to the healthcare costs; and helping the healthcare and social care sectors to develop effective and efficient capital investment strategies.

Research Limitations/implications

Further work needs to develop more systematic ways of rationalising proactive and timely built environment interventions capable of mitigating dementia (and older people) care cost escalation.

Originality/value

This research takes an innovative view on capital investment for care environments and suggests that appropriate built environment interventions can have a profound impact on costs associated with dementia care provision.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2018

Natalie Turner and Stacy Cannon

The purpose of this paper is to set out the history and origins of dementia-friendly communities (DFCs) and age-friendly communities (AFCs) in the UK, the differing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out the history and origins of dementia-friendly communities (DFCs) and age-friendly communities (AFCs) in the UK, the differing frameworks and how they compare, and set out some key messages about how they might learn from each other.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a summary piece written by leaders in the two fields.

Findings

It aims to reduce potential confusion around AFCs and DFCs, and provides some practical ways that the two initiatives might work together and find common ground. By learning from each other, both age-friendly and DFCs can grow their reach and their impact as complementary, and not competing, programmes.

Originality/value

The original development of some of the ideas in this paper comes from a paper Natalie Turner co-wrote with Lydia Morken at AARP (www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/livable-communities/documents-2016/Better-Together-Research-Report.pdf). For this paper, the authors reviewed the approach within the UK context and have furthered and added to the original insights.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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