Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Jonathan Parker, Bridget Penhale, Jill Manthorpe and Greta Bradley

This paper explores the importance of seeking the views of service users with dementia. This is fundamental to raising quality standards in the management of dementia

Abstract

This paper explores the importance of seeking the views of service users with dementia. This is fundamental to raising quality standards in the management of dementia care, and demands commitment to on‐going high quality training for social care staff. Contemporary research and policy developments are debated in this context.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2009

Vee Prasher and Anthony Fernando

Dementia in older persons with learning disabilities is a growing concern for all those involved in their care. There is at present no effective treatment, but the…

Abstract

Dementia in older persons with learning disabilities is a growing concern for all those involved in their care. There is at present no effective treatment, but the importance of current drug treatments is reviewed. Developments in drug treatments for dementia remain an active area of ongoing research.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2009

Vari Drennan and Laura Cole

Mental health problems in old age have attracted policy attention in the UK over the past decade. An important issue is how to improve services for people who have both…

Abstract

Mental health problems in old age have attracted policy attention in the UK over the past decade. An important issue is how to improve services for people who have both mental health and other problems. This article sets out some of the challenges facing planners and commissioners in developing integrated services for older adults, by using the case study of people with dementia and incontinence problems. It uses integrated service models and observations from the EVIDEM‐C study to suggest some incremental actions that would help develop the long‐term strategy for integrated services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Alisoun Milne and Heather Wilkinson

This paper presents the findings of two research projects focusing on sharing a diagnosis of dementia. The first paper analyses the attitudes of GPs towards early…

Abstract

This paper presents the findings of two research projects focusing on sharing a diagnosis of dementia. The first paper analyses the attitudes of GPs towards early diagnosis and the second explores the user experience of receiving a diagnosis (Milne et al, 2000; Pratt & Wilkinson, 2001). The authors draw upon these ‐ as well as wider research ‐ in suggesting ways that diagnostic practice can be improved by taking account of the user perspective. The findings are relevant to all those professionals working in a primary care context.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Arlene Astell

Modern dementia care is increasingly turning to technology to address a wide range of issues. Such developments are argued to improve quality of life, as, for example…

Abstract

Modern dementia care is increasingly turning to technology to address a wide range of issues. Such developments are argued to improve quality of life, as, for example, technological interventions that reduce risks and increase safety can enable people with dementia to stay in their own homes for longer. However, all interventions in dementia care must strike a balance between doing what is perceived to be for the best and preserving the personhood of people with dementia. Technological interventions run a particularly high risk of crossing the line into doing things to people with dementia, rather than with them. Doing things for people with dementia is also problematic if it takes away their ability to do things for themselves. These issues are examined with reference to electronic tagging, assistive or ‘smart’ technology and interventions to address the psychosocial needs of people with dementia.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Viniti Seabrooke and Alisoun Milne

The number of older Asians in the UK is increasing placing greater numbers at risk of developing dementia. The emerging need to address early diagnosis is especially…

Abstract

The number of older Asians in the UK is increasing placing greater numbers at risk of developing dementia. The emerging need to address early diagnosis is especially prominent in areas where Asian communities are long established. This was the specific focus of a Dementia Collaborative Project in North West Kent. The project, working through a primary care practice, aimed to raise awareness of dementia and to facilitate early intervention and access to specialist dementia services. Using an evaluation methodology adopted by the Collaborative and working through a multiagency steering group, the pilot project successfully identified an appropriate primary care practice, established a link with a specially trained Asian nurse and devised a set of project materials. By inviting older Asian patients with memory problems to make an appointment with the nurse, and enclosing a culturally relevant information leaflet, older people were encouraged to come forward. Although the number of individual patients identified was small, the project outcomes include: significantly increased referral rates from black and minority ethnic communities to specialist services and greater awareness of dementia‐related issues in both primary care and Asian care services. Overall, the evaluation suggests that by engaging with a committed primary care practice it is possible to engage a hitherto marginal group of older people in early intervention in dementia and raise awareness about its benefits. That this approach underpins the development of a larger scale five year project in the same area additionally endorses its relevance for the mainstream population.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Lesley Thoms, Adelola Idowu, Arjun Nehra and Asit Biswas

There is high incidence of dementia in individuals with Down’s syndrome. Much of the emphasis has been on Alzheimer’s disease as being most prevalent; however, it is…

Abstract

Purpose

There is high incidence of dementia in individuals with Down’s syndrome. Much of the emphasis has been on Alzheimer’s disease as being most prevalent; however, it is apparent that other dementia types are also likely, to which this patient cohort may be predisposed. Specifically, this paper aims to highlight the potential for subcortical dementias in Down’s syndrome, suggesting a role for broader cognitive screening in aging individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes a case of a female with Down’s syndrome and mild intellectual disability who presented with early signs of distinctive cognitive impairment and radiological calcification of the basal ganglia.

Findings

An active 42-year-old lady, who was mostly independent of activities of daily living and in part-time employment, presented with a three-year history of progressive cognitive deficit, characteristic of subcortical decline. She had no personal or known family history of mental illness, epilepsy or dementia. Routine blood tests showed chronic renal impairment, mild hypocalcaemia and vitamin D deficiency, managed by her GP. CT scan showed only bilateral basal ganglia calcification.

Originality/value

There is a widespread appreciation for the link between Down’s syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease but lesser consideration of the possibility of subcortical dementias. Given the differential nature and presentation of the two dementias, this case report highlights a need for clinicians to consider both to effectively manage these patients in the longer-term. Screening is discussed as a potential means of achieving this.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Shelley Peacock, Meridith Burles, Alexandra Hodson, Maha Kumaran, Rhoda MacRae, Cindy Peternelj-Taylor and Lorraine Holtslander

The number of prisoners over 55 years is increasing and many are at risk of developing dementia. This has generated new responsibilities for prisons to provide health and…

Abstract

Purpose

The number of prisoners over 55 years is increasing and many are at risk of developing dementia. This has generated new responsibilities for prisons to provide health and social care for older persons. The purpose of this paper is to synthesize the existing research literature regarding the phenomenon of the health and social care needs of older persons living with dementia in correctional settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an integrative review method based on Whittemore and Knafl, the inclusion criteria for the review are: articles written in English; a focus on some form of dementia and/or older persons with discussion of dementia; to be set in a correctional context (correctional facility, prison and jail); be derived from a published peer-reviewed journal or unpublished dissertation/thesis; and be a qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods study. Based on those criteria, a search strategy was developed and executed by a health sciences librarian in the following databases: Medline, CINAHL, Embase, PsychINFO, Proquest Nursing and Allied Health and Web of Science; searches were completed up to April 2019. After data were extracted from included studies, synthesis of findings involved an iterative process where thematic analysis was facilitated by Braun and Clarke’s approach.

Findings

Eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Key findings of the eight studies include recognition of dementia as a concern for correctional populations, dementia-related screening and programming for older persons and recommendations for improved screening and care practices. Most significant is the paucity of research available on this topic. Implications for research are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper identified and synthesizes the limited existing international research on the health and social care needs of older persons with dementia living in correctional settings. Although existing research is scant, this review highlights the need for increased awareness of dementia as a concern among older persons living in correctional settings. As well, the review findings emphasize that enhanced screening and interventions, particularly tailored approaches, are imperative to support those living with dementia in correctional settings.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Karen Dodd

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Tobias Ebbing and Marzenna Cichosz

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of transferring modern technology from industries such as logistics to the life of elderly in a way that they…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of transferring modern technology from industries such as logistics to the life of elderly in a way that they can understand, accept and make use of it.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual discussion based on findings from a series of projects in healthcare, IT development and consultancy. The key methodologies considered include technology assessment, scenario development, listening to people with dementia and their caregivers and non-participant observation, as well as reviews of good practice, policy and literature.

Findings

The transfer considerations showed unreasonable price differences of similar hardware used for localization between the logistics and the elderly market. Bluetooth low energy (BLE) was identified as a promising localization technique. A gap in the marketing of technology for the elderly was identified, virtually fencing the elderly market.

Practical implications

A lack of transparency fosters market skimming, resulting in deadweight loss for society and technology being restrained from less-solvent consumers. Corrective actions like entrepreneurship facilitation and consumer education should be considered to overcome this market failure. To persevere in a consequently more competitive market, changes in marketing should be considered.

Originality/value

The work assesses the presence of the innovativeness–needs paradox of Everett Rogers in the field of innovation for the elderly on the basis of an example and identifies the resulting market failure. It suggests a market-entry mode and briefly lays out the marketing modes for market penetration.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000