Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 March 2018

Lalit Manral

This paper aims to explain how the dynamic demand environment influences strategic firm behavior along an industry’s evolutionary path. A conceptual gap concerning the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain how the dynamic demand environment influences strategic firm behavior along an industry’s evolutionary path. A conceptual gap concerning the influence of demand-side environmental factors (vis-à-vis changes in technology and policy) on firms’ strategic choices motivates the theory developed herein. The paper’s contribution to the literature on “evolutionary perspective in strategy” also addresses an important gap in the emerging literature on “strategy dynamics”.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual framework in this paper features a dynamic demand environment that provides the structural context for firms’ strategic choices. It conceptualizes demand-side competence as a mediating firm-specific construct to explain the endogenous relationship between the characteristics of the demand environment and firms’ path dependent demand-side investments.

Findings

A review of the literature on evolutionary perspective in strategy reveals an important conceptual gap concerning the structural determinants of dynamic firm behavior. There is no explanation of the endogenous relationship between dynamic demand structure, firms’ dynamic demand-side competence, and temporally heterogeneous strategic choices.

Originality/value

The demand-side explanation of how idiosyncratic firm behavior is endogenously determined, with both structural characteristics (demand structure) and firm competences (demand-side competence), addresses an important conceptual gap. The novelty of the theory developed herein lies in its explication of the effect of dynamic demand environment on the evolution of idiosyncratic strategic firm behavior – entry, investment and exit – along the evolutionary path of an industry. The theory developed herein not only explains the effect of both determinants of idiosyncratic strategic firm behavior – the external industry environment (dynamic market structure) and internal firm environment (dynamic firm competences) – but also explains how the determinants evolve along the industry’s lifecycle.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Dilip K. Das

The purpose of this paper is to take a dispassionate look at the performance of the Indian economy in the light of its recent growth rate acceleration. After 2000, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to take a dispassionate look at the performance of the Indian economy in the light of its recent growth rate acceleration. After 2000, it recorded several years of vertiginous gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate, which made some think that the growth trajectory of the economy is shifting upwards. A careful data analysis reveals that growth optimism is misplaced. There are several areas of the economy that have suffered from limitations and long‐term neglect of the policymakers. The paper clearly and concisely enumerates them. What is disconcerting is that these long‐term weaknesses were not addressed and are still persisting. Sluggish and tardy reform implementation is one of the serious bottlenecks. In addition, in 2008, myriads of domestic and global factors coalesced to drive GDP growth rate sharply down.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper carefully analyzes the current economic data to examine whether the recent GDP growth rate achievement can be sustained.

Findings

The principal inference of this paper is that the growth spurt of the Indian economy is unsustainable. Although the economy has a great deal of potential, expectations of a China‐like growth in the foreseeable future are totally unrealistic.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a pragmatic plan to break out of this economic quagmire. The value of the paper lies in its succinct and objective analysis of the Indian economic performance, its recent past and the immediate future. Without overlooking its recent achievements, the paper provides a credible vision of the future performance of the Indian economy.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 1 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Lalit Manral

The extant “supply‐side” frameworks of industry evolution fail to predict the evolutionary patterns in industries based on systemic technologies. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The extant “supply‐side” frameworks of industry evolution fail to predict the evolutionary patterns in industries based on systemic technologies. This paper aims to describe the complex demand environment in industries based on systemic technologies and to explain how the continuously evolving demand structure influences the choice and level of firm investments in the above context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies a conceptual gap in the “technology‐centric” literature on industry evolution by conducting a detailed interpretive survey of the literature that focuses on the demand‐side determinants of firm‐ and industry‐level technological processes underlying industry evolution, and co‐evolution of the technological system underlying an industry and the consumer applications based on the same.

Practical implications

The paper provides a set of empirically verifiable mechanisms to explain competing firms' choice and level of investment under conditions of technological and demand uncertainty in industries based on systemic technologies. On one hand, firms' investments influence the evolution of both the technological system(s) and their constituent components that underlie such industries and, on the other, firms' investments influence the consumption of the array of consumer applications that are generated in these industries.

Originality/value

The theoretical explanation provided herein not only enhances the understanding of the role of demand‐side factors as determinants of rate and direction of technological advances but also lies central to the understanding of the evolution of industries based on systemic technologies. More specifically, the paper explains how the interaction between continuously evolving demand structure in the downstream market(s) for consumer applications and the technological components comprising the technological system influences competing firms' choice and level of investments.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Lalit Manral

The thought and rationale of sustainable competitive advantage in strategy are significantly influenced by the Schumpeterian models of dynamic competition in IO and…

Abstract

Purpose

The thought and rationale of sustainable competitive advantage in strategy are significantly influenced by the Schumpeterian models of dynamic competition in IO and evolutionary economics. Yet, most analytical accounts of sustainable competitive advantage fail to explain how firms' investment choices influence, and are simultaneously influenced by, the co‐evolution of “external” industry competition and “internal” firm competences. This paper aims to contribute to the development of a theory of endogenous market structure in strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Two alternative assumptions are developed – concerning temporally heterogeneous firm investment strategy – that lie central to a proposed behavioral theory of endogenous market structure. Additionally, a theoretical description is provided of the endogeneity of the demand‐side determinants of firm investment strategy and industrial market structure. Finally, guidelines are provided for empirical application of [incorporating] the alternative assumptions and theoretical arguments.

Practical implications

It is expected that the theoretical arguments in the paper will influence strategy scholars to develop dynamic models of firm performance that render themselves amenable to sound empirical analyses.

Originality/value

The paper contributes towards developing a theory of endogenous market structure in strategy.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2016

Lalit Manral

The purpose of this paper is to articulate a customer-centric logic to explain the strategic behavior of multi-product corporations whose portfolio of complementary…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to articulate a customer-centric logic to explain the strategic behavior of multi-product corporations whose portfolio of complementary product offerings belong to diverse industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a theoretical framework to explain the heterogeneity in multi-product corporations ' motivation and ability to leverage the demand-side strategic assets developed in their home-markets to enter new markets and thereby improve their long-run corporate performance.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for strategic behavior of multi-product corporations in various industrial sectors such as telecommunications, financial services, consumer discretionary and staples, real estate, and so on.

Originality/value

The profitable applicability of demand-side strategic assets to new contexts should be explained both by the motivation of multi-product consumers (to purchase a portfolio of complementary products from a diversified seller) as well as the motivation of multi-product corporations (to leverage their demand-side strategic assets to enter new markets).

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2018

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context

Findings

Strategic behaviour is shaped considerably by demand-side internal and external factors. Through appropriate investment to acquire and enhance customer-related capabilities, firms can become better positioned than rivals to make effective decisions during along an industry life cycle.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Daniel Domeher and Raymond Abdulai

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the argument linking land registration to agricultural investment and to provide theoretical reasons as to why this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the argument linking land registration to agricultural investment and to provide theoretical reasons as to why this linkage may not materialise in Africa within the short to medium term.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a critical review of the relevant literature on land registration, access to credit and agricultural investment; arguments are built on empirical studies found in the literature and theoretical concepts.

Findings

It has been established in this paper that the links between landed property registration and agricultural investments are made defective in Africa by factors such as poverty, lack of appropriate agro‐based infrastructure and the fact that land registration per se does not improve the profitability of agriculture, neither does it improve access to credit.

Research limitations/implications

The fact that this paper is based on literature review may be seen as a weakness to some extent.

Originality/value

Even though previous researchers have looked at the relationship between landed property registration and agricultural investment in the developing world, they fall short of critically explaining why land registration has been found not to enhance agricultural investment. This paper fills the gap through a combination of various theoretical and practical arguments which could call for a rethinking on the policies for promoting agricultural growth. The rigorous theoretical argument may also provide the basis for further empirical research.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 72 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Bishnu Kumar Adhikary

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the macroeconomic determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) for the top five South Asian economies, namely, Bangladesh…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the macroeconomic determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) for the top five South Asian economies, namely, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Nepal, and to examine whether these factors are the same for each.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs fully modified ordinary least squares and two-stage least squares estimation methods.

Findings

This study shows that South Asian economies have a number of FDI determinants in common. For example, market size and human capital are the two most common factors attracting FDI in each country (except for Nepal, which revealed a negative correlation between FDI and market size). Other factors, such as infrastructure, domestic investment, lending rates, exchange rates, inflation, financial stability/crisis, and stock turnover entered into regression with both positive and negative signs, thereby indicating that the underlying theories on FDI do not provide a clear prediction of the direction of the effect of a particular variable on FDI.

Research limitations/implications

This paper studied the effects of demand-side factors on FDI. A comparative study of the supply-side factors may add further knowledge.

Practical implications

This paper provides evidence to show that the determinants of FDI are indeed country-specific. Thus, to design a suitable FDI policy, it would not be wise to solely rely on other economies’ FDI experiences.

Originality/value

This paper provides updated evidence on factors that are essential to promoting or deterring FDI in South Asian economies.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Edward J. Oughton, Zoraida Frias, Mischa Dohler, Jason Whalley, Douglas Sicker, Jim W. Hall, Jon Crowcroft and David D. Cleevely

Public policy requires effective identification of the current and emerging issues being faced in industry and beyond. This paper aims to identify a set of key issues…

Abstract

Purpose

Public policy requires effective identification of the current and emerging issues being faced in industry and beyond. This paper aims to identify a set of key issues currently facing digital communications and reviews their relevance for the strategic provision of infrastructure, particularly within the UK context.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology focusses on taking a horizon-scanning approach to obtaining current information from a range of authoritative decision makers across industry, government and academia. After structuring the issues identified, these areas are explored by a multi-disciplinary research team covering engineering, economics and computer science.

Findings

Five key categories were identified including future demand; coverage and capacity; policy and regulation; economics and business models; and technology. The results are reported for both fixed and wireless networks. Shared issues affecting the wider digital ecosystem are also identified including Brexit, connecting remote areas and the degree to which the economics of infrastructure allows for building multiple overlapping infrastructures. The authors find that future demand uncertainty is one of the major issues affecting the digital communications sector driven by rigid willingness-to-pay, weak revenue and an increasing shift from fixed to wireless technologies. Policy must create the market conditions that encourage the entry of new competitors with innovative thinking and disruptive business models.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the analysis is that it is quite UK-focussed; hence, further research could broaden this analysis to assessing issues at a continental or global scale.

Originality/value

The value of this paper originates from the breadth of the expert elicitation exercise carried out to gather the initial set of issues, followed by the analysis of this data by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers. The results direct a future research agenda, as many issues are indicative of a lack of existing evidence to support effective decision-making.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 July 2018

Linda F. Edelman, Róisín Donnelly, Tatiana Manolova and Candida G. Brush

Women-led companies receive less than 5 per cent of early-stage equity investment. This paper aims to explore the disparity in equity funding between men- and women-led…

Abstract

Purpose

Women-led companies receive less than 5 per cent of early-stage equity investment. This paper aims to explore the disparity in equity funding between men- and women-led companies, using a social identity perspective, complemented by insights from signaling theory. We argue that in the angel group context, which is male-dominated, gender stereotypes may bias angels’ interpretation of the signals sent by entrepreneurs, so that entrepreneurial ventures led by men are more favorably evaluated, thus excluding women entrepreneurs from funding. The ideas are tested on a sample of 358 entrepreneurs who applied for funding from a northeast US angel group using perceptual data from both sides of the investment dyad. Findings suggest that angel investors view women-led entrepreneurial ventures as having less legitimacy, even though we see no difference in actual legitimacy across ventures.

Design/methodology/approach

The ideas are tested on a sample of 358 entrepreneurs who applied for funding from a northeast angel group using perceptual data from both sides of the investment dyad.

Findings

The findings suggest that, in the context of angel investing, there is a subtle bias that follows from the perceived stereotype between being female and the ability to lead a legitimate new venture. Thus, this study tests the tenets of the social identity theory by finding that mostly male angel investors act in accordance to their gender prescribed roles when they evaluate businesses presented by women entrepreneurs providing some evidence of “in-group” and “out-group” effects and stereotypes.

Research limitations/implications

The findings continue the conversation about biases toward women in early-stage financing by using a social identity lens to look at the way in which adopted identities lead to particular outcomes and stereotypes. The authors have used the context of angel investing to test these ideas, finding some support for their contention that gender is pivotal when angels are making investment decisions. For researchers, this study suggests that gender should not be used solely as a control variable, but instead should be the focus of the inquiry itself.

Practical implications

For practitioners, this study reminds women seeking angel investment that they are not playing on a level field and so they should do all that they can to enhance the legitimacy of themselves and their ventures.

Originality/value

The authors contend that within an angel group that is composed of predominantly men, role stereotypes of entrepreneurs as masculine will be expected, therefore creating gender biases against women. The authors expect these biases, whether conscious or unconscious, will lead the angel investors to evaluate men entrepreneurs more favorably than women entrepreneurs as they move through the angel investment process. Therefore, for women entrepreneurs in the early stages of investment funding, the authors posit that the dearth of funding is a function of gender identity stereotypes which may be manifested in hidden and often unconscious biases on the part of the angel investor.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000