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Functional Structure Inference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44453-061-5

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

David Walters

The purpose of this research is to understand the current developments in business models that are aimed at meeting changing market characteristics, many of which require…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand the current developments in business models that are aimed at meeting changing market characteristics, many of which require specific customer service responses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a conceptual model that is based on research into the applications of response management.

Findings

This paper suggests validity of the proposed model but also identifies the need for further research.

Practical implications

The paper assumes that management has the awareness and the skills set to manage and deliver added value to customers by implementing a more relevant model.

Originality/value

This paper offers examples of organisations that are responding to market and customer expectations using response management models.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Book part
Publication date: 5 November 1992

John D. Whitley

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Economic Modeling in the Nordic Countries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-859-9

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2020

Ilkka Ruostetsaari

The purpose of this paper is to test the effects of citizens’ support for two rival and opposing conceptions of political involvement, political consumerism and stealth…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the effects of citizens’ support for two rival and opposing conceptions of political involvement, political consumerism and stealth democracy, on their attitudes about demand response (flexible consumption) and prosumerism (self-production) in the context of making of Finnish energy policy. Stealth democracy represents an established view on the role of citizens in energy policy making: the energy sector has traditionally been presented as a technocratic domain reserved for experts and businessmen. By contrast, political consumerism can be seen as an expression of “energy democracy”.

Design/methodology/approach

The data is based on a postal survey and an internet survey that were conducted in 2016 among a random sample representing Finns who were between 18 and 75 years. The dependence of the support for demand response and prosumerism on the endorsement of political consumerism and stealth democracy will be tested statistically (Pearson chi-square).

Findings

The endorsement of demand response mainly depended statistically on citizens’ attitudes towards political consumerism and stealth democracy. However, comparing electricity prices and changing electricity suppliers did not depend on adherence to political consumerism and stealth democracy. Nevertheless, in these cases, support was higher among the supporters of political consumerism than among supporters of stealth democracy. By contrast, the endorsement of prosumerism, for instance, in terms of factors that influence citizens’ decisions to invest in electricity generation in their households, depended statistically on citizens’ attitudes on political consumerism and stealth democracy.

Research limitations/implications

It might be that the variables used in this study to measure stealth democracy are not specific enough. More generally, Finns’ willingness to support for stealth democracy may be based on or at least encouraged by the misunderstandings of democratic politics: more information is needed on the level of knowledge that citizens have about normative principles of democratic decision-making processes.

Practical implications

The implication of this study for energy policy making is that there are (at least in Finland) good preconditions for developing a decentralized energy system: citizens are ready to adopt a more active role as energy citizens in terms of demand response and prosumerism – irrespective of their attitudes on macro-level attitudes on governmental institutions. Democratization of the energy system could strengthen the legitimacy of energy policy making.

Social implications

Citizens’ attitudes indicate that their potential for involvement needs to be strengthened in the spirit of energy democracy: the idea of energy democracy needs to be seen in terms of the demand for increased accountability and democratization of the energy sector that was previously not seen as requiring public involvement and was most often depoliticized and dominated by technocrats. However, strengthening energy democracy through demand response and prosumerism is not without its problems: utilization of these devices requires a relatively large amount of resources which depend on the individuals’ socio-economic position. Thus, energy democracy cannot replace but complement electoral participation as a form of energy policy involvement.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study is to fill a part of the research gap linking to ongoing energy transitions. As a socio-technical transition can take place only if citizens support and participate in it, we need to better understand citizens’ attitudes on energy consumption and production and energy policy involvement. Citizens’ attitudes on energy production and consumption are becoming more and more critical for managing the energy sector as a result of that the share of wind power and solar power is increasing in the energy system. In a decentralized energy system, citizens have to be prepared to change their modes of operation. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the originality of this study is to test the impact of citizens’ political attitudes on the endorsement of demand response and prosumerism.

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International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Book part
Publication date: 27 March 2006

Sabine Sonnentag and Charlotte Fritz

In this chapter, we review empirical research evidence on the relationship between stressors and catecholamines (i.e., adrenaline and noradrenaline) and cortisol. With…

Abstract

In this chapter, we review empirical research evidence on the relationship between stressors and catecholamines (i.e., adrenaline and noradrenaline) and cortisol. With respect to acute stressors, both laboratory and field research have shown that the exposure to stressors leads to an increase in catecholamine and cortisol levels. With respect to more chronic stressors, research evidence is less consistent. Chronic mental workload was found to be related to elevated adrenaline levels. With respect to cortisol responses the interaction between workload and other variables seems to play a role. Empirical studies suggest that chronic stressors affect the responsivity to acute stressors. Research showed that after the exposure to stressors catecholamine and cortisol recovery is delayed.

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Employee Health, Coping and Methodologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-289-4

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2018

Meilinda F.N. Maghfiroh and Shinya Hanaoka

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the application of the dynamic vehicle routing problem for last mile distribution during disaster response. The authors explore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the application of the dynamic vehicle routing problem for last mile distribution during disaster response. The authors explore a model that involves limited heterogeneous vehicles, multiple trips, locations with different accessibilities, uncertain demands, and anticipating new locations that are expected to build responsive last mile distribution systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The modified simulated annealing algorithm with variable neighborhood search for local search is used to solve the last mile distribution model based on the criterion of total travel time. A dynamic simulator that accommodates new requests from demand nodes and a sample average estimator was added to the framework to deal with the stochastic and dynamicity of the problem.

Findings

This study illustrates some practical complexities in last mile distribution during disaster response and shows the benefits of flexible vehicle routing by considering stochastic and dynamic situations.

Research limitations/implications

This study only focuses day-to-day distribution on road/land transportation for distribution, and additional transportation modes need to be considered further.

Practical implications

The proposed model offers operational insights for government disaster agencies by highlighting the dynamic model concept for supporting relief distribution decisions. The result suggests that different characteristics and complexities of affected areas might require different distribution strategies.

Originality/value

This study modifies the concept of the truck and trailer routing problem to model locations with different accessibilities while anticipating the information gap for demand size and locations. The results show the importance of flexible distribution systems during a disaster for minimizing the disaster risks.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Alain Lempereur and Michele Pekar

This article aims to explore the fundamental negotiation structure as a demand/response dynamic. It tests it in a complex business system, where a manager as a negotiator…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to explore the fundamental negotiation structure as a demand/response dynamic. It tests it in a complex business system, where a manager as a negotiator is confronted with multiple demands or pressures at different levels from a variety of stakeholders, both external and internal.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on concrete examples from the automotive industry, it presents an analytical framework to tackle all negotiation interactions.

Findings

This article suggests that it is possible to describe all negotiation interactions, whether they are simple or complex, through a demand/response framework.

Originality/value

This contribution examines a fundamental structure for negotiation responsibility – the demand/response dynamic – defining the mission of any negotiator in deal-making or dispute resolution as to try to supply a response to the expressed crossed demands. Second, the proposed theoretical model of demand/response is transposed and tested in a managerial system where a sales negotiator is confronted with demands from more sources, both external and internal, with the responsibility to satisfy as best as possible the various stakeholders and the capacity to address each of them with different moves.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Change and Continuity Management in the Public Sector: The DALI Model for Effective Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-168-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Magda Kandil

Provides an evaluation of the reality of the German economy after unification, also answers to some of the questions that the post‐unification era has raised, analyzes…

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1307

Abstract

Provides an evaluation of the reality of the German economy after unification, also answers to some of the questions that the post‐unification era has raised, analyzes aggregate and sectoral data of the former GDR and the Federal Republic of Germany over the period 1970‐1989. The results characterize the former GDR with a steeper supply curve. While the central plan assumed a steady growth of real output over time, it eliminated producers’ incentives to vary capacity utilization in response to demand pressures. Demand pressures proved inflationary without determining conditions in the labor market. In contrast, the market‐oriented plan in West Germany tied output expansion and contraction with demand fluctuations. Consequently, inflationary effects of demand fluctuations appeared moderate in West Germany and real output growth was not sustained at a high level over time. Demand fluctuations determined employment changes in West Germany. Implications of these differences are analyzed in light of the reality of the post‐unification in Germany.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2012

Nitsan Chorev

This article explores the range of responses available to international bureaucracies when confronted with demands made by their member states through the study of the…

Abstract

This article explores the range of responses available to international bureaucracies when confronted with demands made by their member states through the study of the World Health Organization (WHO) during the 1970s and 1980s. I show that the WHO bureaucracy successfully addressed the demands of developing countries for health policies compatible with a more equitable world economic order, but in a way that preserved the bureaucracy's own agenda and without upsetting the opposite coalition of wealthy countries. Drawing on insights from the sociology of organizations, this article shows that externally dependent international bureaucracies are able to preserve their autonomous agenda by strategically reframing countries’ demands before responding to them.

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Political Power and Social Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-867-0

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