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Publication date: 20 October 2015

Mohammad Shamsuddoha

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from…

Abstract

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from unstructured supply chain practices, lack of awareness of the implications of the sustainability concept and failure to recycle poultry wastes. The current research thus attempts to develop an integrated supply chain model in the context of poultry industry in Bangladesh. The study considers both sustainability and supply chain issues in order to incorporate them in the poultry supply chain. By placing the forward and reverse supply chains in a single framework, existing problems can be resolved to gain economic, social and environmental benefits, which will be more sustainable than the present practices.

The theoretical underpinning of this research is ‘sustainability’ and the ‘supply chain processes’ in order to examine possible improvements in the poultry production process along with waste management. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and ‘design science’ methods with the support of system dynamics (SD) and the case study methods. Initially, a mental model is developed followed by the causal loop diagram based on in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and observation techniques. The causal model helps to understand the linkages between the associated variables for each issue. Finally, the causal loop diagram is transformed into a stock and flow (quantitative) model, which is a prerequisite for SD-based simulation modelling. A decision support system (DSS) is then developed to analyse the complex decision-making process along the supply chains.

The findings reveal that integration of the supply chain can bring economic, social and environmental sustainability along with a structured production process. It is also observed that the poultry industry can apply the model outcomes in the real-life practices with minor adjustments. This present research has both theoretical and practical implications. The proposed model’s unique characteristics in mitigating the existing problems are supported by the sustainability and supply chain theories. As for practical implications, the poultry industry in Bangladesh can follow the proposed supply chain structure (as par the research model) and test various policies via simulation prior to its application. Positive outcomes of the simulation study may provide enough confidence to implement the desired changes within the industry and their supply chain networks.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Bingfeng Bai, Junjun Gao and Yang Lv

This paper aims to assess the links among these demand chain constructs by conducting a full-scale systematic review of all demand chain management (DCM) literature…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the links among these demand chain constructs by conducting a full-scale systematic review of all demand chain management (DCM) literature reviews published in marketing and operations management journals from 2013 to 2020. Marketing and supply chain management are central to DCM; thus, this study briefly describes the contributions to knowledge provided by the papers contained in this issue. In addition, some additional areas of research in which the DCM can be gainfully deployed are outlined.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper makes a systematic literature review of 70 literature samples by means of content analysis and comprehensive analysis. These approaches guarantee a replicable, rigorous and transparent research process and minimize researcher bias. The analytical categories required for the content analysis are defined along the constructs of marketing and supply chain management.

Findings

As can be expected, this paper highlights the key role of the two constructs in the strategy of DCM. In this light, the paper claims to provide evidence of a link between the constructs of marketing and supply chain management. This paper reviews the connotation of DCM through literature review, distinguishes the relationship between DCM and supply chain management from a strategic management perspective and discusses the future research direction.

Research limitations/implications

This study assesses the link between the strategic constructs of marketing and supply chain management through research embedded in literature reviews, pinpointing research gaps and potential future research directions in the field. Contributing to DCM theory building, a thorough review provides qualitative comparison of the link between marketing and supply chain management.

Originality/value

Although some literature reviews have been conducted in the past on the constructs of DCM, no full review of literature reviews aiming to test a strategic theoretical link in the demand chain related to supply chain and marketing.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 44 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

David Walters

The purpose of this research is to argue that a number of organisations focused their efforts on developing sophisticated supply chains such that their managerial focus…

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15599

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to argue that a number of organisations focused their efforts on developing sophisticated supply chains such that their managerial focus became myopic, and many lost sight of their markets and their customers, missing the fact that the customers, failing to realise their expectations, switched their loyalties. Thus it is argued here that it is essential to understand the demand chain prior to making supply chain structure decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The first step is to reinforce the point that both supply chain management and demand chain management are about process management. The second step is to re‐validate the notion of the demand chain as a separate entity from the supply chain.

Findings

It is interesting to postulate that the differences between the demand chain‐led organization and the supply chain‐led organisation are based on emphasis. The paper attempts to make this point by suggesting that, while supply chain management is to a degree customer‐focused, the emphasis is on efficiency. Management concern is cost‐led and attempts to provide an adequate level of service. The danger here is that customers may be “aggregated” or fitted into categories that appear to be nearly relevant. Thus the link between supplier relationship management and customer relationship management is tenuous. By contrast the demand chain approach is a broader view of relationship management, taking a view that supplier and customer relationship management overlap, and that effective management is to integrate the two. If this is achieved, it results in bringing often conflicting objectives more closely together.

Research limitations/implications

Contrasting the demand chain approach as a broader view of relationship management, and taking the view that effective management is to integrate the two. The view is that, if this is achieved, it results in bringing often conflicting objectives more closely together. Clearly more research is needed before such a view can be held with conviction.

Practical implications

This paper argues that a number of organisations focused their efforts on developing sophisticated supply chains such that their managerial focus became myopic, and many lost sight of their markets and their customers, missing the fact that the customers, failing to realise their expectations, switched their loyalties.

Originality/value

It is argued here that it is essential to understand the demand chain prior to making supply chain structure decisions.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

David Walters

The purpose of this research is to understand the current developments in business models that are aimed at meeting changing market characteristics, many of which require…

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8443

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand the current developments in business models that are aimed at meeting changing market characteristics, many of which require specific customer service responses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a conceptual model that is based on research into the applications of response management.

Findings

This paper suggests validity of the proposed model but also identifies the need for further research.

Practical implications

The paper assumes that management has the awareness and the skills set to manage and deliver added value to customers by implementing a more relevant model.

Originality/value

This paper offers examples of organisations that are responding to market and customer expectations using response management models.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 38 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

David H. Taylor and Andrew Fearne

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the problems with demand management in fresh food value chains and to propose a framework for demand analysis and improved demand

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7469

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the problems with demand management in fresh food value chains and to propose a framework for demand analysis and improved demand management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on empirical evidence from multiple case studies undertaken in the UK food industry.

Findings

Evidence from the case studies indicates a consistent misalignment of demand and supply, due to demand amplification, poor production systems and inconsistencies with information and data handling procedures.

Research limitations/implications

The case study evidence is limited to the UK context and is therefore unlikely to be representative of the global situation in fresh food value chains. The proposed framework is based on the case study evidence but has not been formally tested.

Practical implications

More collaboration, information sharing and joint planning from primary production through to retailing is critical if fresh food value chains are to function efficiently and effectively in retail environments where promotional activity creates significant uncertainty.

Originality/value

Demand management has received little attention to date, outside the industry framework of ECR. This paper is the first to propose a framework for improvement based on greater collaboration and joint planning that extends beyond the retailer‐manufacturer interface

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

David H. Taylor

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from a major UK research project covering six agri‐food supply chains, each spanning from farm to consumer.

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3653

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings from a major UK research project covering six agri‐food supply chains, each spanning from farm to consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper gives an overview of relevant literature out of which three research questions are posed. The research methodology is then outlined, followed by an overview of the methods used to collect and analyse the case study data. A summary of the research findings is then presented followed by a discussion of the findings in the context of the research questions. The paper concludes with an assessment of the validity of the research followed by some tentative suggestions regarding the need for, and potential benefits of, improving demand management in agri‐food chains.

Findings

The research has found that demand management is an area, which in practice is beset by difficulties and inefficiencies, which in turn affects the operational performance of the supply chains. Analysis of the characteristics of demand along the chains demonstrates a propensity for misalignment of demand and activity due to issues such as demand amplification and inappropriate production policies. The paper also identifies a number of operational inefficiencies and inconsistencies, which typically occur in the information systems and data handling procedures within these chains.

Originality/value

Suggestions are given as to how demand management processes could be improved through cooperative efforts across the supply chain.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Amit Sinha, William P. Millhiser and Yuanjie He

The field of supply chain management (SCM) evolves dramatically due to factors of globalization, innovation, sustainability, and technology. These changes raise challenges…

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2979

Abstract

Purpose

The field of supply chain management (SCM) evolves dramatically due to factors of globalization, innovation, sustainability, and technology. These changes raise challenges not only to higher education institutions, but also to students, employing organizations, and third parties like SCM-related professional bodies. To understand the challenge, the purpose of this paper is to examine the gap between demand and supply of SCM-related knowledge areas, answer-related design questions, and make recommendations to close the gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

To compare the demand and supply of SCM-related knowledge areas, demand data is collected from a professional career website and supply data is gathered from operations management (OM) and SCM course syllabi from AACSB-accredited business schools in the USA. Cluster analysis identifies how supply and demand are matched on the data collected.

Findings

First, gaps exist between SCM talent requirements from industry and the knowledge/skill training by US business schools. This paper identifies matching, under-supplying, and over-supplying knowledge areas. Under-supply in emerging areas such as SCM information technology and certain logistics management topics are found. Some traditional OM topics are over-supplied due to out-of-date industry applications and should be revised to reflect the field’s transition from an OM to SCM view. Last, this paper makes recommendations to different stakeholders in this matching supply with demand process.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature in two ways. First, it provides an up-to-date understanding on demand and supply of SCM talent in USA. Second, it provides insights and recommendations not only to educators on curriculum design, but also to potential candidates interested in SCM careers, to companies’ job recruiters, and to professional organizations (such as APICS and Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals) to reduce the gaps between demand and supply.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

A. Seetharaman, A. Ali Khatibi and Wu Swee Ting

Explains the linkage of vendor development and control as an integral factor of value on demand chain logistics. Presents a comparison of the traditional purchasing…

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4547

Abstract

Explains the linkage of vendor development and control as an integral factor of value on demand chain logistics. Presents a comparison of the traditional purchasing function with vendor development in. Provides the missing link of value chain by demand chain. Describes the supplier integration approach as a competitive corporate strategy in a conceptual synthesis by linking demand chain with order management, marketing, sales, channel management, pricing, service, etc. Analyses the vendor development strategy from three key dimensions. Further discusses the advantages of vendor development in the short run, bottom line performance increase, and long run revenue enhancing the value of an organisation. Also discusses the impact on demand chain from the costing point of view with elaboration on cost and pricing activities involving total cost of ownership, understanding supplier costs and target costing with target pricing commensurate with expectations of customers. Concludes with an emphasis on the importance of providing e‐learning and upgrading the skills of staff in order to expedite the adoption of vendor integration strategy in its demand chain logistics management.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 34 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Per Hilletofth

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the current understanding and knowledge of the demand‐supply chain management (DSCM) concept by determining its elements, benefits…

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4671

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enhance the current understanding and knowledge of the demand‐supply chain management (DSCM) concept by determining its elements, benefits, and requirements, and by illustrating its occurrence in practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This research has utilized a literature and case study research strategy. The case study has involved an international manufacturing company from the appliance industry. Empirical data have been collected mainly from in‐depth interviews with key persons representing senior and middle management in the case organization.

Findings

This research has established that the main elements of DSCM include market orientation, coordination of the demand and supply processes, viewing the demand and supply processes as being equally important, as well as value creation, differentiation, innovativeness, responsiveness, and cost efficiency in the demand and supply processes. It has also been revealed that the main benefits of DSCM include enhanced competitiveness, enhanced demand chain performance, and enhanced supply chain performance, while the main requirements of DSCM include organizational competences, company‐established principles, demand‐supply chain collaboration, and information technology support.

Research limitations/implications

This research is explorative in nature, and more empirical data, from similar and other research settings, are needed to further validate the findings. Another limitation of the research is that it is limited to one Swedish company; however, the involved case company has a large international presence and is among the top three in its industry, which provides some ground for the generalization. A final limitation of the research is that the involved company only represents one industry.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights useful to researchers and practitioners on how to develop a demand‐supply oriented business. It highlights that firms should organize themselves around understanding how customer value is created and delivered and how these processes and management directions can be coordinated. The demand and supply processes have to be considered as equally important and the firm needs to be managed by the demand side and supply side of the company jointly in a coordinated manner.

Originality/value

The need to coordinate the demand and supply processes has been emphasized in both the demand and supply chain literature but still remained relatively unexplored; thus, this paper contributes by investigating this matter further.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

David H. Taylor and Andrew Fearne

To highlight the problems with and propose a framework for improving demand management in retail food supply chains.

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6837

Abstract

Purpose

To highlight the problems with and propose a framework for improving demand management in retail food supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on empirical evidence from multiple case studies and develops a framework for improvement in demand management for retail food supply chains.

Findings

Analysis of the characteristics of demand within a number of retail food supply chains demonstrates a propensity for misalignment of demand and supply due to issues such as demand amplification, inappropriate production policies and inconsistencies with information systems and data handling procedures.

Research limitations/implications

The case study evidence on which the conceptual framework is based is drawn exclusively from the UK, where retail food supply chains are generally more mature than in other parts of the world. The proposed framework is based on empirical evidence but has not been formally tested.

Practical implications

More collaboration, information sharing and joint planning beyond the manufacturer‐retailer interface is critical if retail food supply chains are to function efficiently and effectively in retail environments where promotional activity creates significant uncertainty.

Originality/value

Demand management in retail food supply chains has received little attention from supply chain researchers to date. This paper proposes a framework for improvement based on greater collaboration and joint planning from farm to fork.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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