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Article

Souad Djelassi, Delphine Godefroit-Winkel and Mbaye Fall Diallo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing customer loyalty to shopping centres across different emerging countries. Specifically, it seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing customer loyalty to shopping centres across different emerging countries. Specifically, it seeks to determine how the cultural context moderates the direct effects of shopping centre perceived value and customer satisfaction on customer loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A shopping centre-intercept survey was conducted among 244 consumers in Morocco and 203 consumers in Tunisia. The proposed model was analysed using partial least squares path modelling.

Findings

The results demonstrate the impacts of perceived utilitarian and non-utilitarian value on customer satisfaction with a shopping centre, both moderated by the cultural context. Specifically, utilitarian, hedonic and relaxation values exert stronger influences on satisfaction in Tunisia than in Morocco; but socialisation value has a stronger impact on it in Morocco than in Tunisia. The influences of value dimensions on customer loyalty to the shopping centre do not vary between Tunisia and Morocco.

Practical implications

With these results shopping centre developers and retailers can develop more efficient strategies to target Maghreb emerging countries. For example, they should focus on factors that may increase the utilitarian, hedonic and relaxation values offered by shopping centres in Tunisia but address factors that facilitate socialisation value in Morocco.

Originality/value

By using a cross-culture perspective, this paper extends and enriches knowledge on shopping centre patronage in Maghreb countries. Also, it considers two non-utilitarian values (socialisation and relaxation), which are relevant in Maghreb countries.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Marie Schill and Delphine Godefroit-Winkel

The purpose of this study is to explore consumers’ profiles for and purchase intentions towards smart environmental objects. It segments consumers according to two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore consumers’ profiles for and purchase intentions towards smart environmental objects. It segments consumers according to two apparently contradictory dimensions of smart environmental objects: environment (i.e. environmental concern and environmental beliefs) and technology (i.e. materialistic values and technological beliefs).

Design/methodology/approach

A cluster analysis was conducted among 658 French consumers based on their environmental concern, environmental beliefs, materialistic values, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. A regression analysis identifies the variables with the greatest influence on purchase intentions.

Findings

Four segments result from the analysis: unconcerned, retro eco-friendly, non-materialistic converted and converted. The converted consumer segment had the highest purchase intentions and exhibited high levels of both environmental beliefs and perceived usefulness compared with the other segments. Both environmental and technological beliefs and environmental concern influence purchase intentions more broadly.

Research limitations/implications

A combined consideration of both environmental and technological beliefs is necessary to influence purchase intentions towards smart environmental objects. This study challenges some previous research that assumes a clear opposition between materialism and environmentalism.

Practical implications

This study proposes tailored managerial recommendations for each of the four consumer segments in the context of smart environmental objects.

Originality/value

This study provides novel insights into consumers’ concerns, beliefs and values in the rapidly expanding context of smart environmental objects.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Delphine Godefroit-Winkel, Marie Schill and Margaret K. Hogg

This paper aims to examine the interplay of emotions and consumption within intergenerational exchanges. It shows how emotions pervade the trajectories of grandmothers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the interplay of emotions and consumption within intergenerational exchanges. It shows how emotions pervade the trajectories of grandmothers’ relational identities with their grandchildren through consumption practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyses qualitative data gathered via 28 long interviews with French grandmothers and 27 semi-structured interviews with their grandchildren. This study draws on attachment theory to interpret the voices of both grandmothers and their grandchildren within these dyads.

Findings

This study uncovers distinct relational identities of grandmothers linked to emotions and the age of the grandchild, as embedded in consumption. It identifies the defining characteristics of the trajectory of social/relational identities and finds these to be linked to grandchildren’s ages.

Research limitations/implications

This study elicits the emotion profiles, which influence grandmothers’ patterns of consumption in their relationships with their grandchildren. It further uncovers distinct attachment styles (embedded in emotions) between grandmothers and grandchildren in the context of their consumption experiences. Finally, it provides evidence that emotions occur at the interpersonal level. This observation is an addition to existing literature in consumer research, which has often conceived of consumer emotions as being only a private matter and as an intrapersonal phenomenon.

Practical implications

The findings offer avenues for the development of strategies for intergenerational marketing, particularly promotion campaigns which link either the reinforcement or the suppression of emotion profiles in advertising messages with the consumption of products or services by different generations.

Social implications

This study suggests that public institutions might multiply opportunities for family and consumer experiences to combat specific societal issues related to elderly people’s isolation.

Originality/value

In contrast to earlier work, which has examined emotions within the ebb and flow of individual and multiple social identities, this study examines how emotions and consumption play out in social/relational identity trajectories.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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