Search results

1 – 10 of over 58000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

M.T. Cunningham and B.G. Dale

The author investigate the effect which the delivery performance of a company's suppliers have upon the company's own delivery assurance and reputation. Alternative…

Abstract

The author investigate the effect which the delivery performance of a company's suppliers have upon the company's own delivery assurance and reputation. Alternative methods of evaluating supplier delivery performance are studied. An analysis is made of the extent to which the suppliers' poor delivery performance was adversely affected by factors under the control of the company's own sales, design, production and purchasing departments in requesting unrealistic dates from suppliers.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Helena Forslund, Patrik Jonsson and Stig‐Arne Mattsson

The purpose of this paper is to generate a performance model for an order‐to‐delivery (OTD) process in delivery scheduling environments. It aims to do this with a triadic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to generate a performance model for an order‐to‐delivery (OTD) process in delivery scheduling environments. It aims to do this with a triadic approach, encompassing a customer, a supplier and a logistics service provider.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a conceptual analysis and a triadic case study on performance measurement requirements in an OTD process characterized by delivery scheduling, and generating performance models.

Findings

Two OTD process performance models, one for the supplier's delivery sub‐process and one for the customer's delivery scheduling, the logistics service provider's transportation and the customer's good receipt sub‐process, in delivery scheduling environments are generated.

Research limitations/implications

A single case study limits the levels of external validity and reliability to analytical generalization.

Practical implications

The generated performance models include definitions of four sub‐processes and outline ten performance dimensions that should be of relevance for several companies to apply.

Originality/value

This is the first approach that generates performance models for a triadic OTD process for use in delivery scheduling environments.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 58 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Giovani J.C. da Silveira, Brent Snider and Jaydeep Balakrishnan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of compensation‐based incentives in relationships between enterprise resource planning (ERP) usage and delivery

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of compensation‐based incentives in relationships between enterprise resource planning (ERP) usage and delivery performance in manufacturing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carry out two studies exploring links between ERP, incentives, and performance from alternative perspectives: first, of incentives tied to regular production activities, and their relationship with delivery performance advantage over competitors; second, of incentives tied to improvement activities and their relationship with delivery performance improvements. Statistical analysis is carried out on data from 698 metal‐working manufacturers from 22 countries, giving a broad cross‐sectional view of a global industry.

Findings

The studies indicate that ERP usage relates positively with both delivery advantage and delivery improvements. Furthermore, incentives tied to improvement initiatives may explain delivery improvements, both directly and as moderators in the relationship between ERP and performance.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that ERP adoption can be framed as a principal‐agency phenomenon where performance outcomes are partially influenced by incentives.

Practical implications

The results imply that incentives tied to improvement initiatives may foster employee engagement with the new ERP, leading to stronger delivery performance benefits.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first research to explore ERP usage as a principal‐agency problem, and to analyse its relationships with incentives under alternative performance perspectives. The results may significantly contribute to the knowledge of ERP‐performance relationships and the role of incentives.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sakun Boon‐itt and Chee Yew Wong

The purpose of this paper is to test the moderating effects of technological and demand uncertainties on the relationship between supply chain integration and customer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the moderating effects of technological and demand uncertainties on the relationship between supply chain integration and customer delivery performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey questionnaire with 151 participants in the Thai automotive industry supply chain, hierarchical regressions are used to test the moderating effects.

Findings

Internal and supplier integration, but not customer integration, were positively associated with customer delivery performance. Technological and demand uncertainties were found to moderate the relationships between internal integration and customer delivery performance, and supplier integration and customer delivery performance.

Research limitations/implications

The moderating effects of technological and demand uncertainties in the Thai automotive just‐in‐time (JIT) environment are explained. This research contributes to the development of a contingency theory of supply chain integration suggesting that the impacts of supply chain integration on customer delivery performance vary under different levels of technological and demand uncertainties.

Practical implications

Managers recognize the diminishing effects of internal integration and supplier integration under demand uncertainty, and the increasing effect of supplier integration under high technological uncertainty.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the supply chain management literature by clarifying the moderating effects of technological and demand uncertainties on the relationship between supply chain integration and customer delivery performance.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Michael Milgate

As just‐in‐time delivery has become increasingly commonplace and customer demands continue to tighten, the importance of fast, reliable delivery performance cannot be…

Abstract

As just‐in‐time delivery has become increasingly commonplace and customer demands continue to tighten, the importance of fast, reliable delivery performance cannot be overstated. This is particularly true for organisations competing internationally, where the complexity of the supply chain must be managed within a global network. A conceptual model is presented that identifies three basic dimensions of this complexity. Results support the linkage of uncertainty with performance, however, no evidence was found that increased technological intricacy or more complicated organisational systems hamper delivery performance. Managers appear to have adopted mechanisms to accommodate these last two dimensions of complexity.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Pamela Danese, Pietro Romano and Thomas Bortolotti

The purpose of this paper is to study whether just in time (JIT) supply practices interact with JIT production practices by positively moderating the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study whether just in time (JIT) supply practices interact with JIT production practices by positively moderating the relationship between JIT production and efficiency/delivery performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, six hypotheses are developed on the relationships between JIT production, JIT supply, efficiency and delivery performance. The hypotheses are tested through a hierarchical regression analysis using data from a sample of 207 manufacturing plants.

Findings

JIT production practices positively affect both efficiency and delivery. JIT supply practices positively moderate the relationship between JIT production and delivery, while there is no significant moderating effect when considering the impact on efficiency. The role of JIT supply as moderator is twofold. On the one hand, it strengthens the positive impact of JIT production on delivery through a complementary effect. On the other hand, low levels of adoption of JIT supply practices can hinder and – for extremely low levels – cancel the impact of JIT production practices on delivery.

Practical implications

When efficiency is the priority, companies should direct their efforts on JIT production. However, when their aim is to maximize delivery, they should invest on both JIT production and JIT supply. Results found advise managers to implement some JIT supply practices during the early stages of JIT production programs, because the total absence of any JIT linkages with suppliers can limit JIT production benefits on delivery performance.

Originality/value

This study elaborates on the mutual influence between JIT production and JIT supply practices and demonstrates that they have a different weight and contribute to different aspects of performance improvement. This can help managers involved in JIT implementation to better allocate scarce resources.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 112 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

C.C. New and M.T. Sweeney

Results have shown that the actual delivery performance of a company is often significantly worse than management's own assessment of its performance.

Abstract

Results have shown that the actual delivery performance of a company is often significantly worse than management's own assessment of its performance.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Giovani J.C. da Silveira and Rebecca Arkader

To explore the paths by which coordination investments with suppliers and customers relate to improvements in delivery speed, delivery reliability, and manufacturing lead‐time.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the paths by which coordination investments with suppliers and customers relate to improvements in delivery speed, delivery reliability, and manufacturing lead‐time.

Design/methodology/approach

Regression analysis of data on supply chain coordination investment and delivery performance from 243 manufacturers from 13 countries.

Findings

Results provide evidence of direct relationships between supplier coordination investment and manufacturing lead‐time, and between customer coordination investment and delivery speed and delivery reliability. Moreover, they suggest that customer investment mediates the relationship between supplier investment and delivery reliability, and that supplier investment mediates the relationship between customer investment and manufacturing lead‐time.

Practical implications

To achieve sustainable improvements in multiple aspects of performance, management may need to invest in coordination with partners both upstream and downstream in the supply chain.

Originality/value

This appears to be the first study to provide evidence of both direct and mediated relationships between supplier and customer coordination investment, and delivery performance.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Darren McWhirt, Junyong Ahn, Jennifer S. Shane and Kelly C. Strong

Design‐build project delivery will likely yield benefits when it is a rational choice by a program director or owner's construction manager. It is not well understood…

Abstract

Purpose

Design‐build project delivery will likely yield benefits when it is a rational choice by a program director or owner's construction manager. It is not well understood whether those benefits translate to construction programs where design‐build is mandated for the vast majority of project types. Such a determination for military construction (MILCON) is the purpose of this paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for the research involved a comparison of mean performance metrics for design‐build and design‐bid‐build MILCON projects. Once an appropriate sample of projects was identified, project data were corrected for project location, size and time‐value‐of‐money.

Findings

Military design‐build projects did experience a lower total cost of change orders as well as a reduced change order cost associated with field changes. Also, statistical analysis demonstrated no significant difference in project performance metrics based on facility type. These results indicate that design‐build project delivery method can work equally well on all types of MILCON projects and is an effective system for cost and scope control, but that some of the expected schedule performance gains underlying the decision to use design‐build will be difficult to achieve on all MILCON projects.

Originality/value

The paper presents advantages and disadvantages of utilising design‐build to MILCON projects by facility types.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Esraa Hussein Nabass and Ayman Bahjat Abdallah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of agile manufacturing (AM) on business performance and operational performance (OP) dimensions in manufacturing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of agile manufacturing (AM) on business performance and operational performance (OP) dimensions in manufacturing companies in Jordan. It also explores the indirect effect of AM on business performance through OP dimensions of cost, quality, delivery and flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyzes survey data collected from 282 manufacturing companies from different industries in Jordan. Validity and reliability analyses were performed using SPSS and Amos, and the research hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results demonstrated that AM positively and directly affected business performance. It also positively affected OP dimensions of quality, delivery and flexibility. However, cost performance was not significantly affected by AM. In addition, quality performance and flexibility performance fully mediated the relationship between AM and business performance, whereas cost performance and delivery performance did not show mediating effects.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, this is the first study that investigates the mediating effects of OP dimensions on the relationship between AM and business performance. In addition, a limited number of previous studies investigated the performance outcomes of AM. Furthermore, this area is under-investigated in the Middle East in general and in Jordan in particular.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 58000