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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Deirdre Healy

This paper aims to consider the advantages to using the Rehabilition Code within personal injury litigation.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider the advantages to using the Rehabilition Code within personal injury litigation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is designed to take the reader through the key features of the Rehabilitation Code, how the Code is implemented on a practical level and the advantages to both Claimant and Defendant Advisors in utilising the Code.

Findings

The article highlights that the early provision of rehabilitation can make a significant and positive contribution to the life of an injured party. It actively encourages all parties involved in the litigation process to act in a collaborative manner and to fully engage with the Rehabilitation Code.

Originality/value

This paper sets out a framework for legal advisors to use when considering the provision of early rehabilitation within litigation.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Andy Mantell and Patti Simonson

Abstract

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Book part
Publication date: 21 April 2021

Fiona Macaulay

Abstract

Details

Transforming State Responses to Feminicide: Women's Movements, Law and Criminal Justice Institutions in Brazil
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-566-0

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2013

Lynette Riley, Deirdre Howard-Wagner, Janet Mooney and Cat Kutay

This chapter outlines the successful community engagement process used by the authors for the Kinship Online project in the context of Indigenous methodological…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter outlines the successful community engagement process used by the authors for the Kinship Online project in the context of Indigenous methodological, epistemological, and ethical considerations. It juxtaposes Indigenous and western ways of teaching and research, exploring in greater detail the differences between them. The following chapter builds on and extends Riley, Howard-Wagner, Mooney & Kutay (2013, in press) to delve deeply into the importance of embedding Aboriginal cultural knowledge in curriculum at the university level.

Practical implications

The chapter gives an account of an Office for Learning and Teaching (OLTC) grant to develop Indigenous Online Cultural Teaching and Sharing Resources (the Kinship Online Project). The project is built on an existing face-to-face interactive presentation based on Australian Aboriginal Kinship systems created by Lynette Riley, which is being re-developed as an online cultural education workshop.

Value

A key consideration of the researchers has been Aboriginal community engagement in relation to the design and development of the project. The chapter delves deeply into the importance of embedding Aboriginal cultural knowledge into curriculum at the university level. In doing so, the chapter sets out an Aboriginal community engagement model compared with a western research model which the authors hope will be useful to other researchers who wish to engage in research with Aboriginal people and/or communities.

Details

Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6

Keywords

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