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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Dinesh Seth, Nitin Seth and Deepak Goel

The purpose of this paper is to identify and address various wastes in the supply chain of the edible cottonseed oil industry (specifically the processing side) using a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and address various wastes in the supply chain of the edible cottonseed oil industry (specifically the processing side) using a value stream mapping (VSM) approach to improve productivity and capacity utilization in an Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical observations and interviewing techniques were used with open‐ended questions to understand the processes involved in the value chain of the cottonseed oil industry. Different chain links/members were investigated through personal visits and discussions. VSM is applied as an approach to the industry to identify and remove non‐value‐adding (NVA) activities.

Findings

Major findings obtained from the study are as follows. There is an excess cumulative inventory of 244 days in the whole supply chain. The industry is highly fragmented with a large number of small players present, which hampers the use of economies of scale. There are NVA activities present in the supply chain such as the moving of cottonseed oil from expeller mill to refinery. The industry still uses outdated technology which hampers the productivity.

Practical implications

Attention needs to be given to boosting the productivity of the oil sector. Waste removal from the oilseed‐processing sector is one key to improving the productivity of the sector.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the various wastes in the processing side of the supply chain of the Indian cottonseed oil industry, using VSM as an approach which was hardly ever attempted before. Wastes are then individually attacked to reduce or eliminate them from the system. Suggestions to make the whole chain more productive can be generalized and can be replicated in the context of other developing countries.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Abstract

Subject Area

Strategic Management, Business Ethics.

Study Level

This case is suitable to be used in advanced undergraduate and MBA/MSc level.

Case Overview

The case accentuates the challenges faced by Geetanjali Woollens in its mechanical recycling business which is proving detrimental to its African business expansion plans. The case is developed from the episodes of divergence in January 2018 when the buyers’ non-acceptance of mechanically recycled products initiated a managerial dilemma between “business sustenance” and “sustainable business” for Geetanjali Woollens. Being associated with the recycling business for more than 25 years, Madhukar Ghosh, the General Manager at Geetanjali Woollen recycling unit, was delving upon practical, supply-chain-wide solutions to generate standard acceptance norms for mechanically recycled textiles. For him, ethical purpose of business existence was equally important as the profit motive. Bringing operational clarity and standardized regulatory framework still seemed a big challenge for international policymakers and torchbearers of environmental responsibility, and Governments and NGOs popularizing green initiatives. Lack of policy guidelines for business behavior was exacerbating the business functioning. Madhukar knew that consistent buyer policies and standard regulatory framework could clear some mist and induce maturity in the concept of circular economy. Some formalizations were expected till the end of December 2018, if the deadlines did not get pushed further.

Expected Learning Outcomes

The objectives of this case are as follows:

  • to highlight the limitations that recycled apparel and textile products have and the concerns that emerge for buyers, designers, and consumers, due to these limitations;

  • to highlight the myopic business vision with which the recycling business is suffering due to the lack of a formalized regulatory framework, which in turn is creating various system barriers and making recycling business an unattractive proposition;

  • to appreciate the contribution of mechanical recycling of post-consumer textile waste as a closed-loop manufacturing technique in recouping the eco-impacts of increased disposal of apparel and textile products; and

  • to promote discussions for innovative solutions for limitations and concerns related to substances of concern in the recycling business and deliberations for a more effective tracking of such substances to facilitate buyer acceptance of mechanically recycled products.

to highlight the limitations that recycled apparel and textile products have and the concerns that emerge for buyers, designers, and consumers, due to these limitations;

to highlight the myopic business vision with which the recycling business is suffering due to the lack of a formalized regulatory framework, which in turn is creating various system barriers and making recycling business an unattractive proposition;

to appreciate the contribution of mechanical recycling of post-consumer textile waste as a closed-loop manufacturing technique in recouping the eco-impacts of increased disposal of apparel and textile products; and

to promote discussions for innovative solutions for limitations and concerns related to substances of concern in the recycling business and deliberations for a more effective tracking of such substances to facilitate buyer acceptance of mechanically recycled products.

Details

Green Behavior and Corporate Social Responsibility in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-684-2

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 28 September 2015

Tripti Ghosh Sharma, Vishesh Srajan Tyagi, Laksh Sharma and Rupayan Banerjee

Social enterprise, Social entrepreneurship.

Abstract

Subject area

Social enterprise, Social entrepreneurship.

Study level/applicability

PGDM, PGDM Executive.

Case overview

The case is about the evolution of a unique social organization, BloodConnect, over its journey of four years. Initiated by two Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Delhi students in 2010, the organization went on to be recognized for making leeway into the hitherto underserved need of blood security in India. The case describes BloodConnect's evolution with respect to different dimensions of blood shortages and the organization's acquisition of knowledge over the years. BloodConnect acted as a facilitator to bring multiple stakeholders, including potential donor segments, beneficiaries, hospitals, government and NGOs, on the same platform to collectively identify solutions, thereby increasing the ownership of each segment toward an issue of importance to the society. While the organization started gaining visibility and was on its way to making its operation structured, it desired to move beyond the confines of Delhi-NCR to raise the movement to the national level, but it was faced with challenges peppered with lack of resources, lack of funds, absence of a permanent leadership and complex dynamics between the multiple stakeholders. Donor dependency for funds and amateur management were the other major impediments for its sustenance. The case brings forth the major challenges threatening the very existence of the organization as it grappled to identify solutions that could provide revenue sustainability without dampening its mission of creating social value. The case is of relevance to social enterprises in the context of a developing nation as most of the low and middle income countries face similar challenges pertaining to blood security. It also brings forth the issues of survival, scalability and the concept of social value measurement. In what are the myriad hurdles faced by start-ups, the traditional metrics might not be enough while measuring the impact created by a social enterprise.

Expected learning outcomes

To develop an insight into the unique challenges faced by start-up social ventures and options available to them for growth and subsequent consolidation. To enhance the understanding of interrelationship between mission focus, scale of operations, revenue sustainability and social impact. To introduce students to the concept of social value measurement. The students would be able to appreciate the uniqueness of the metrics specific to a social venture.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Vipul Jain and Lyes Benyoucef with David Bennett

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 December 2021

Tripti Agarwal, Prarthna Agarwal Goel, Hom Gartaula, Munmum Rai, Deepak Bijarniya, Dil Bahadur Rahut and M.L. Jat

Increasing trends of climatic risk pose challenges to the food security and livelihoods of smallholders in vulnerable regions, where farmers often face loss of the entire…

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Abstract

Purpose

Increasing trends of climatic risk pose challenges to the food security and livelihoods of smallholders in vulnerable regions, where farmers often face loss of the entire crop, pushing farmers (mostly men) out of agriculture in destitution, creating a situation of agricultural making agriculture highly feminization and compelling male farmers to out-migrate. Climate-smart agricultural practices (CSAPs) are promoted to cope with climatic risks. This study aims to assess how knowledge related to CSAPs, male out-migration, education and income contribute to the determinants of male out-migration and CSAPs adoption and how they respond to household food security.

Design/methodology/approach

Sex-disaggregated primary data were collected from adopter and non-adopter farm families. STATA 13.1 was used to perform principle component analysis to construct knowledge, yield and income indices.

Findings

Yield and income index of adopters was higher for men than women. The probability of out-migration reduced by 21% with adoption of CSAPs. An increase in female literacy by 1 unit reduces log of odds to migrate by 0.37. With every unit increase in knowledge index, increase in log-odds of CSAPs adoption was 1.57. Male:female knowledge gap was less among adopters. Non-adopters tended to reduce food consumption when faced with climatic risks significantly, and the probability of migration increased by 50% with a one-unit fall in the nutrition level, thus compelling women to work more in agriculture. Gender-equitable enhancement of CSAP knowledge is, therefore, key to safeguarding sustainable farming systems and improving livelihoods.

Social implications

The enhancement of gender equitable knowledge on CSAPs is key to safeguard sustainable farming systems and improved livelihoods.

Originality/value

This study is based on the robust data sets of 100 each of male and female from 100 households (n = 200) using well-designed and validated survey instrument. From 10 randomly selected climate-smart villages in Samastipur and Vaishali districts of Bihar, India, together with focus group discussions, the primary data were collected by interviewing both men and women from the same household.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Deepak Chawla, Shikha Bhatia and Sonali Singh

Parents are the first and leading socialization agents for young adults. It is vital to recognize the influence of perceived parental financial behaviour in shaping the…

Abstract

Purpose

Parents are the first and leading socialization agents for young adults. It is vital to recognize the influence of perceived parental financial behaviour in shaping the financial literacy and investment behaviour of their children. In this context, this paper aims to test the perceived parental influence on financial literacy. Additionally, the direct and indirect influence of financial literacy on investment behaviour of young adults is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses survey-based cross-sectional data. The partial least squares-structure equation model has been used to estimate and test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Perceived parental financial behaviour has been found to significantly impact the level of financial literacy. In turn, financial literacy positively influences the investment behaviour of young adults. Moreover, the young adults’ perception of confidence over ability to take right financial decisions drives their decision to invest.

Social implications

The results of this study imply that there is a need to have planned interventions from policymakers to ensure that young adults are financially literate. This may require introduction of planned programmes or workshops at middle or senior school levels. These programmes should help young adults understand the need for focused and long-term investing in the absence of social benefits.

Originality/value

This study is one of the preliminary works to examine the perceived parental influence on young adults’ financial literacy and further linking these with actual investment behaviour.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2022

Omkar Deepak Karmarkar, Shivram G. Krishnan, Venkata Santosh Kumar Delhi and Nagendra R. Rao Velaga

India is a rapidly urbanizing developing country with a population of 1.4 Billion. Indian governments have invested USD 50 Billion) in metro rail projects in 18 cities…

Abstract

Purpose

India is a rapidly urbanizing developing country with a population of 1.4 Billion. Indian governments have invested USD 50 Billion) in metro rail projects in 18 cities. Metro constructions are multi-stakeholder mega-projects and are prone to a variety of risks. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the risks involved in metro rail construction projects in a densely populated developing country for two types of systems and from two perspectives. Current literature lacks an understanding of similarities and differences in the risks involved in underground and elevated metro projects from clients' and contractors' perspectives, which the paper highlights.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of twenty-five risks were identified, categorized and assessed through experts' opinions about the impact and probability of occurrence of the risks through a questionnaire-based survey. The survey respondents included experts in metro rail construction from client and contractor sides. Paper uses a Fuzzy Inference System to calibrate risk magnitude from occurrence probability and impact.

Findings

A notable difference was observed in the views of clients and contractors, except for certain common risks. Both stakeholders had different risk perceptions for the underground and elevated metro rail systems.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the risk assessment for different types of metro systems. This research can help policymakers as well as consultants in prioritizing their risk management strategies in developing countries like India.

Originality/value

Highlighting the critical aspects of risks in metro projects in a developing country, this paper also provides system-based and stakeholder-based comparative aspects of risk analysis.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Deepak Sangroya, Gaurav Kabra, Yatish Joshi and Mohit Yadav

This study examines various aspects of green energy management operations in India and reports the current state, potential avenues and barriers for green energy management.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines various aspects of green energy management operations in India and reports the current state, potential avenues and barriers for green energy management.

Design/methodology/approach

This study performs an extensive literature review and covers the several aspects of green energy management operations.

Findings

The findings report the current state of various aspects of green energy management operations such as: procurement, manufacturing and distribution and provides the viable business models. It further explains the various facilitators and barriers of green energy management and reports the opportunities and challenges that exist in developing and managing green energy supply chain.

Originality/value

The study is pioneer in providing a comprehensive view of developing and managing green energy operations in India. The study is useful to various organisations on drafting strategies to effectively adopt and manage green energy. The study is also useful in policy formulation for promoting green energy use. This article also set as a base for future researchers working in the area of green energy.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2019

Sadia Samar Ali, Rajbir Kaur and Jose Antonio Marmolejo Saucedo

Abstract

Details

Best Practices in Green Supply Chain Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-216-5

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