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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Kuldeep Singh and Deepa Pillai

Research signifies that well-governed companies exhibit long-run financial results and sustainable growth. In the context of SMEs, this paper aims to review the literature…

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Abstract

Purpose

Research signifies that well-governed companies exhibit long-run financial results and sustainable growth. In the context of SMEs, this paper aims to review the literature on corporate governance, the implementation challenges of corporate governance and its relationship with performance. Entwined with Indian scenarios, the study can be generalized to other emerging economies, with geographic considerations.

Design/methodology/approach

Studies from 1990 to 2020 are included in the literature review. Three databases were used for the extraction of relevant research articles: Scopus, EBSCO and ScienceDirect. To identify the relevant work, keywords along with Boolean operators for literature search were used from the research databases. The selected articles were further refined based on the authors’ keywords, journal type, data analysis methodologies and abstract analysis. Finally, 115 articles were selected and categorized into themes based on inclusion criteria for further study.

Findings

Corporate governance provides tangible and intangible benefits to SMEs. The study emphasizes on designing a cost-effective discrete governance mechanism for SMEs than the prevailing corporate governance code for large firms. Furthermore, implementing the corporate governance structure with a great level of discipline and stability is equally essential and related to performance.

Originality/value

Listing of SMEs is a relatively new phenomenon in emerging economies, including India. With listing, corporate governance and financial performance are expected to shift. The inclusion of the changing landscape of SME governance makes this study unique and relevant in the current scenario. The study will benefit the policymakers and firms to adopt optimum governance practices and link it optimally with performance.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 30 March 2022

Sadhna Dash, Leena B. Dam, Deepa Pillai and Jitender Kumar

At the end of the case discussion, students would be able to: design key account selection criteria for the organization’s vast clients; analyse the application of key…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

At the end of the case discussion, students would be able to: design key account selection criteria for the organization’s vast clients; analyse the application of key account management (KAM) strategies in a business-to-business (B2B) segment for revenue growth for a medium-scale enterprise; recognize the significance of KAM in a B2B space for a scale enterprise; and assess the proficiency of Univ Manufacturers (UM) for KAM in addressing the existing challenges and managing business growth.

Case overview/synopsis

Tarun, the proprietor of UM, has recently received two big orders, one from Ram Enterprise, a long-standing client since 2011 of INR 2m (10% profit margin) and another order from a new client based in Chennai, a growing pharmaceutical products company, of order size of INR 2.3m (15% profit margin). Both the orders were required to be completed within 15 days. The new client with higher value and better returns could help UM enter the south India market, whereas business from the existing client was also profitable. Despite both orders being necessary for business survival and expansion, fulfilling them on schedule posed a huge challenge. Tarun wanted to fulfil both orders. He knew similar situations might arise in future. He advocated prioritizing customers, which made him contemplate KAM. On what basis he should categorize his customers was a big question. Tarun felt that it was time for UM to strategize relationship management with his customers. He wanted to optimize the partnerships. Tarun knew he wanted to introduce KAM, but was firm-level internal capabilities were enough for key account execution. What would be the feasible outcomes if KAM is applied at UM? What must he do to prevent such situations in the future?

Complexity academic level

This case can be used in B2B marketing and sales management courses. The dilemma can be explained as part of a marketing course for postgraduate and executive programs.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 27 December 2021

Leena B. Dam and Deepa Pillai

The instructor should discuss the various forms of organization. Particular reference needs to be drawn on “For Benefit” firms. How such firms enable societal development…

Abstract

Theoretical basis

The instructor should discuss the various forms of organization. Particular reference needs to be drawn on “For Benefit” firms. How such firms enable societal development should be stressed upon. Other theories considered are “need achievement theory”, “self-determination theory” and “social cognitive theory.”

Research methodology

The primary data for the case was from a series of in-depth interviews and interactions with Sonia and her core team members of Bazaar and Approval Teams. Frequent deliberation with the founder and core team led to interesting dialogues on the aspiration to uphold Pune Ladies Association (PULA) Exclusives Pvt. Ltd. as a “For Benefit firm” and developing indigenous women entrepreneurs which was a stimuli for writing the case. Online surveys of the PULA verified sellers were conducted to identify their rationale of starting the venture and also their experiences on the PULA platform.

Case overview/synopsis

March 2019, the core committee of PULA Exclusives Pvt. Ltd. (the firm) engineered a dialogue. They wanted to expand a new horizon with its mission of “For Benefit”. The firm is an offshoot of PULA, a virtual women’s community in Facebook.

Complexity academic level

The case may be used for postgraduate students pursuing entrepreneurship and management courses. The case can be used for teaching executive level programs of business strategy and digital media. The case applies to the use of digital media in businesses, social entrepreneurship and innovation strategies.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Poornima Tapas and Deepa Pillai

The purpose of this study is to examine and interpret the findings from different sources on the corporate decisions during COVID-19.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine and interpret the findings from different sources on the corporate decisions during COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

The COVID-19 is a new phenomenon; grounded theory research approach is adopted to develop propositions on prospect theory and strategic decisions. The paper examines and interprets the findings from different sources on the corporate decisions during COVID-19.

Findings

Conventionally, it is believed that innovation brings risks, and individuals preferred certainty over uncertainty, even if the gains under uncertainty were twice as high. But, the results of the study indicate a divergent trend. Under threat perceptions of risks, companies explore significant opportunities and possibilities for organizational growth.

Practical implications

The study provides a framework to analyze the strategic decisions of corporate enterprises. The decisions replicate value function as concave in a gain situation and convex in a loss realm in times of pandemic crises.

Originality/value

This paper uses “actions taken” by enterprises offering various solutions in the testing times. The study is multidisciplinary in nature; it analyses the transformation strategic decisions in the context of economic and social dimensions for surviving the pandemic crises. The study provides a foundation for future research, as inferences are based on select examples.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Deepa Pillai and Shubhra Mishra Deshpande

Warehouse receipt-based financing (WRF), an innovative instrument with its structure embedded in the agricultural value chain can potentially address farmers' concerns…

Abstract

Purpose

Warehouse receipt-based financing (WRF), an innovative instrument with its structure embedded in the agricultural value chain can potentially address farmers' concerns about timely credit access and accessible remunerative markets. However, studies indicate farmers' exclusion from currently practiced WRF mechanisms across developing countries. Transaction cost and lack of assured remunerative markets post storage are the challenges thwarting farmers' participation. The study explores how these challenges can be addressed by analyzing a case study. The finding will help in coming up with a farmer-inclusive WRF mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a case study as an analysis tool. Primary data is gathered through farmers. Descriptive statistics and partial least squares (PLS) approach to structural equation modeling methodology has been adopted for empirical testing of the hypothesis of the study. The study uses SMART PLS 3.0 for analysis of data.

Findings

Single window offering of multiple value chain operations and technological intervention in physical handling substantially reduces transaction costs for farmers. Sustained farmers' participation in the case supports this finding. The presence of an assured market (PAM) is found to have a positive and significant relationship with WRF in the case of beneficiary farmers. The PAM is found to have a negative yet significant relationship with WRF in the case of nonbeneficiary farmers. Critical success factors of the entity KisanMitra stated in the case substantiates a farmer-inclusive WRF mechanism.

Research limitations/implications

The study analyzes a case study of specific geography. However, similarities enlisted across developing countries in the introduction section provide a scope of generalization of findings across developing countries. The identified factors for a farmer-inclusive WRF mechanism will enable the governments, policymakers and development institutions to ascertain and align their WRF implementation measures to inculcate and upgrade these factors to the prospective WRF agents. Future studies can explore the replication of farmer-inclusive WRF mechanisms across other geographies. The studies also explores the role of technological interventions in further reducing the transaction cost and suitable policy modifications to encourage replication of the study in other geopgraphical context.

Originality/value

The study on WRF and the methodology adopted is first of its kind to identify factors for a farmer-inclusive WRF mechanism.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 29 January 2019

Deepa Pillai and Leena B. Dam

The learning outcomes are as follows: decision-making in the areas of business plan, business strategy, financial management, profit planning and marketing, learning from…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes are as follows: decision-making in the areas of business plan, business strategy, financial management, profit planning and marketing, learning from outer business environment, succession planning for first-generation entrepreneur and choosing appropriate source of financing and drivers for diversification.

Case overview/synopsis

Immersed in sipping green tea in his capacious office lounge, the octogenarian Arjun Mehta introspected on the trials and tribulations of his journey as an entrepreneur, the voyage which started four decades ago. From 1976 to 2018, the business has now traversed three generations. Starting with Spice Mart (Sole Proprietor) to Hindware and Lament Construction (partnership firms) to Starlite Homes Pvt. Ltd. (corporate entity), Mr Mehta witnessed transformation and restructuring in organization with every new generation which characterized the evolution of family business. Handholding children to take up the reins of Spice Mart was not a calculated choice. Yet it is remarkable to study the growth in organizational structure of the regional family business. As a self-made entrepreneur, morals, ethics and value system are vital ingredients steering the organic growth story. Third-generation Mehta’s are enterprising, aspiring and visionary. With the incorporation of a corporate entity, they convinced themselves to bring inorganic growth in their business. Arjun Mehta gleamed with pride as Spice Mart partakes an organized structure which had lost prominence with the second-generation entrepreneurs. But he is equally hammered with juxtaposed thoughts. He contemplates whether the integration of retail business with real estate corroborates sustainable innovation. Will independent businesses create the brand’s footprints perpetually? Should the millennial confine business natively or should they grow internationally and become a conglomerate?

Complexity academic level

The case can be exclusively taught to masters and executive education class of students pursuing entrepreneurship and business management courses. The case will supplement understanding of theories of entrepreneurship and dimensions of family businesses in emerging economies.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Ramaprasad Unni, D L.P. and Deepa Pillai

The purpose of this research is to examine whether there are differences in use of price sources in online and offline shopping contexts, and the effect of time spent…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine whether there are differences in use of price sources in online and offline shopping contexts, and the effect of time spent online on these potential differences.

Design/methodology/approach

A quasi‐field experimental design with shopping channel and online usage as factors is used. MANOVA was used to analyze the data collected from 180 subjects (54 percent female; mean age of sample=27 years).

Findings

The findings revealed context specificity in the use of price sources. Prices previously seen in traditional media are more likely to be used while shopping offline, while prices previously seen on the internet are more likely to be used while shopping online. The extent of time spent online would also lead to more use of prices previously seen on the internet.

Research limitations/implications

The research examined consumer intentions of using price sources within the accessibility‐diagnosticity framework. Future research should measure accessibility and diagnosticity of specific price sources in different shopping contexts.

Practical implications

Retailers should base their pricing on channel characteristics. They should exploit the capabilities of the online channel to be more competitive. Pricing communication strategies should also take into account extent of time spent online.

Originality/value

The research suggests that price parity between online and offline channels may not be critical for multichannel marketers. Online and offline channels are different shopping contexts and as such offer unique opportunities to attract consumers. Pricing strategies should take into account these differences.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Kesha K. Coker, Deepa Pillai and Siva K. Balasubramanian

Rewards from sales promotions may be either immediate (e.g. instant savings, coupons, instant rebates) or delayed (e.g. rebates, refunds). The latter type is of interest…

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Abstract

Purpose

Rewards from sales promotions may be either immediate (e.g. instant savings, coupons, instant rebates) or delayed (e.g. rebates, refunds). The latter type is of interest in this study. The purpose of this paper is to present the hyperbolic discounting framework as an explanation for how consumers delay‐discount rewards, and test whether this holds for both high‐price and low‐price product categories.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by administering two online surveys to respondents. One survey presented choice scenarios between sales promotion formats for a high‐priced product (a laptop, n=154) and the other for a low‐priced product (a cell phone, n=98). Hyperbolic and exponential functions were then fitted to the data.

Findings

The hyperbolic function had a better fit than the exponential function for the low‐priced product. However, this effect was not evident in the case of the high‐priced product; no significant difference was found between the functions. The rate of discounting was greater for the high‐priced product than for the low‐priced product. Thus, for low‐priced products, rather than discount a reward rationally, consumers tend to discount the value of the reward at a decreasing rate.

Originality/value

This study addresses delay discounting in the context of a typical consumer buying situation. It also addresses the possibility of consumers applying different forms of discounting to products at different price levels and tests for the same. The results are of considerable significance for marketers wishing to offer price discounts to consumers. For low‐priced products, marketers seem to have more flexibility in delaying the reward, since the rate of discounting decreases for longer delay periods. At the same time, the discount rate for high‐priced products is higher than that for low‐priced products, hence delay periods may have a more critical role as discounted values fall steeply with an increase in delay to reward.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Siva K. Balasubramanian, Hemant Patwardhan, Deepa Pillai and Kesha K. Coker

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a conceptual framework of attitudinal constructs that influence attitude toward the brand in movie product placements…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a conceptual framework of attitudinal constructs that influence attitude toward the brand in movie product placements. Advertising literature is replete with studies on factors that influence attitude toward the brand (Ab). However, this topic remains under-explored for product placements.

Design/methodology/approach

Our framework showcases several theories to relate attitude and fit constructs to attitudes toward the product placement and attitude toward the brand. We use the structural equation model approach to estimate the conceptual framework.

Findings

Several attitudinal movie constructs (attitude toward the actor, the character and the movie) influence attitude toward the product placement, which in turn mediates the relationship between the former attitudinal constructs and attitude toward the brand. Interestingly, only the fit between the actor and placed brand impacted attitude toward the product placement, with no effects found for the fit between the character and the fit between the movie and brand and the attitude toward the product placement.

Research limitations/implications

We focus on explicit attitudes; implicit attitudes need future research attention.

Practical implications

Findings affirm a key role for the actor featured in the placement in directly or indirectly shaping the attitude toward the brand.

Originality/value

This is the first study to apply the structural equation modeling approach to this research area.

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

John Fraedrich

The purpose of this paper is to explain how Wroe Alderson's concepts have been cited and used in the last two decades as well as the gap that still exists for researchers…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how Wroe Alderson's concepts have been cited and used in the last two decades as well as the gap that still exists for researchers to answer about the grand theory of marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a comment on Alderson's intellectual legacy.

Findings

The practical implication is that Alderson's 150 falsifiable, functionalistic propositions have not been empirically verified.

Originality/value

The paper explains why Alderson's work is still important.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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