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1 – 10 of 851
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Akponanabofa Henry Oti, Peter Farrell, Fonbeyin Henry Abanda, Paul McMahon, Abdul-Majeed Mahamadu, Dingayo Mzyece, Adeyemi Ayodele Akintola and Nawal Prinja

The relatively low capital cost and contributions to mitigating global warming have favoured the continuous construction and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs…

Abstract

Purpose

The relatively low capital cost and contributions to mitigating global warming have favoured the continuous construction and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) across the world. One critical phase in the operation of nuclear plants for ensuring the safety and security of radioactive products and by-products is decommissioning. With the advent of digital twinning in the building information modelling (BIM) methodology, efficiency and safety can be improved from context-focus access to regulations pertaining to demolition of structures and the cleaning-up of radioactivity inherent in nuclear stations. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to propose a BIM-driven framework to achieve a more regulation-aware and safer decommissioning of nuclear power plants.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework considers task requirements, and landscape and environmental factors in modelling demolition scenarios that characterise decommissioning processes. The framework integrates decommissioning rules/regulations in a BIM linked non-structured query system to model items and decommissioning tasks, which are implemented based on context-focussed retrieval of decommissioning rules and regulations. The concept’s efficacy is demonstrated using example cases of digitalised NPPs.

Findings

This approach contributes to enhancing improvements in nuclear plant decommissioning with potential for appropriate activity sequencing, risk reduction and ensuring safety.

Originality/value

A BIM-driven framework hinged on querying non-structured databases to provide context-focussed access to nuclear rules and regulations and to aiding decommissioning is new.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Mio Fredriksson and Linda Moberg

The purpose of this paper was to study the unfolding of an urgent and extensive decommissioning program in Sweden, focusing on the public’s reactions and their arguments…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to study the unfolding of an urgent and extensive decommissioning program in Sweden, focusing on the public’s reactions and their arguments when opposing the decommissioning activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The public’s responses were studied through local media. Its content was surveyed and divided into actions and arguments. The arguments were further analyzed and categorized into inductively developed themes.

Findings

Protest activities, such as demonstrations, meetings and petitions, were not coordinated, but mostly carried out for withdrawals of unique services and services in remote areas. The public questioned the decision makers’ information, calculations and competence, the adequacy of the consequence analyses and whether the decommissioning activities would lead to any real savings. Patient and public safety, the vulnerable in society, and effects on the local areas were important topics. Thus, it seems the decision makers did not fully succeed in communicating the demonstrable benefits or create clarity of the rationales for decommissioning the particular services. Furthermore, it seems the public has a more inclusive approach to health services and their value compared to decision makers that need to keep the budget.

Originality/value

Decommissioning is an emerging field of research, and this study of the unfolding of an urgent and extensive decommissioning program contributes with evidence that may improve decommissioning policy and practice. The study illustrates that it may be possible to implement a decommissioning program despite public protest, but that the longer-term effects on the health system’s legitimacy need to be studied.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Mike Parr

This paper describes the design development and testing of the remotely operated equipment which will be deployed to decommission the redundant Caesium Extraction Plant…

Abstract

This paper describes the design development and testing of the remotely operated equipment which will be deployed to decommission the redundant Caesium Extraction Plant located at the British Nuclear Fuels plc Sellafield site in Cumbria, UK. The radioactive environment in which the project has to be carried out presents a number of unique challenges to the engineers involved. To carry out the project extensive new facilities are to be constructed. It is from these facilities that the Decommissioning Machine (DCM) will be deployed to remove the equipment located within the Caesium Plant. The DCM will be operated from a separate control room and observed by CCTV. Construction of the new facility is nearing completion with decommissioning operations due to start in year 2000.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Francesca Loia, Nunzia Capobianco and Roberto Vona

This study aims to investigate the collective perception regarding the future of offshore platforms and frame the main categories of meanings associated by the community…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the collective perception regarding the future of offshore platforms and frame the main categories of meanings associated by the community with the investigated phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

A data driven approach has been conducted. The collection of the peoples’ opinions has been realized on two specific social network communities as follows: Twitter and Instagram. The text mining processes carried out a sentiment and a cluster analysis.

Findings

The sentiment analysis of the most frequent words has been shown. The following four main homogeneous categories of words are emerged in relation to the decommissioning of offshore platforms: technological areas, green governance (GG), circular economy and socio-economic sphere.

Research limitations/implications

The alternative use of the offshore platforms, including tourism initiatives, aquaculture, alternative energy generation, hydrogen storage and environmental research, could improve the resilience of communities by offering the development of new jobs and the growth of local and innovative green businesses.

Practical implications

The adoption of a circular model and GG initiatives aims to limit the input of resources and energy, minimize waste and losses, adopt a sustainable approach and realize new social and territorial value.

Originality/value

The analysis underlines the importance to adopt a systems perspective, which takes into account the social, economic and environmental system as a whole, the different phenomena that occur and the variety of categories of stakeholders, from users to local governments that participate in the territorial development.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Anna Yakovlieva, Sergii Boichenko, Utku Kale and András Nagy

The purpose of this study is to analyze existing policies, methods and technologies, which are aimed at the rational and proper handling of decommissioned aviation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze existing policies, methods and technologies, which are aimed at the rational and proper handling of decommissioned aviation transport means, determination of the world trends and substantiation of the prospects for implementation of utilization and recycling programs in the aviation industry. This research is devoted to problems of utilization and recycling of decommissioned aircraft and its components: features of proper handling of aviation industry vehicles are considered; the analysis of existing methods and technologies aimed at the rational and correct handling of the end-of-life aircraft is carried out; the necessity of the introduction of the system of complex utilization of aviation equipment is substantiated; the ecological and economic problems connected with the utilization and recycling of aviation vehicles, their units and units are considered; and the relevance and feasibility of introducing recycling programs in the field of aviation industry waste management are substantiated.

Design/methodology/approach

Problems of utilization and recycling of decommissioned aircraft and its components are considered in this research. The analysis of existing methods and technologies aimed at the rational and correct handling of the end-of-life aircraft is carried out. In addition to this, the ecological and economic problems connected with the utilization and recycling of aviation vehicles, their units and parts are considered. Moreover, the relevance and feasibility of introducing recycling programs in the field of aviation industry waste management are substantiated.

Findings

In this study, the life cycle of aircraft is carried out and analyzed. The existing methodologies and approaches to end-of-life aircraft recycling and utilization are presented in this paper. The experience of the leading organizations in the sphere of decommissioned aircraft recycling, such as Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association and Process for Advanced Management of End-of-Life Aircraft, are considered as well. Environmental and economical benefits to aviation and neighbor industries, arising from the introduction of aircraft recycling systems, are shown.

Originality/value

The existing experience of leading companies in the aviation and aircraft recycling industry is accumulated and analyzed to show and propose the general methodology for the development and implementation methodology of end-of-life aircraft recycling and utilization.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 93 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Robert Bogue

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the uses of robots in the nuclear power industry, with an emphasis on newer developments and applications.

4345

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the uses of robots in the nuclear power industry, with an emphasis on newer developments and applications.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an introduction to the nuclear industry, this paper considers robotic applications in two areas: test and inspection and decommissioning. A range of products, applications and case histories are discussed.

Findings

It is shown that robots are used widely for test and inspection and decommissioning tasks. The majority are highly specialised and are frequently produced by specialist nuclear engineering companies. The main robotic test and inspection techniques are visual inspection, ultrasonics and eddy current and the use of robots reflects both the need to minimise operator exposure to radiation and the frequent difficulties in accessing critical components such as pressure vessel welds and steam generator tubes. Key decommissioning uses include handling and size reduction of contaminated materials, cutting and demolition.

Originality/value

This paper provides details of inspection and decommissioning robots in the nuclear power industry.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Diletta Colette Invernizzi, Giorgio Locatelli and Naomi J. Brookes

The literature lacks a single and universally accepted definition of major and megaprojects: usually, these projects are described as projects with a budget above $1…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature lacks a single and universally accepted definition of major and megaprojects: usually, these projects are described as projects with a budget above $1 billion and a high level of innovation, complexity, and uniqueness both in terms of physical infrastructure and stakeholder network. Moreover, they often provide fewer benefits than what were originally expected and are affected by delays and cost overruns. Despite this techno-economic magnitude, it is still extremely hard to gather lessons learned from these projects in a systematic way. The purpose of this paper is to present an innovative methodology based on benchmarking to investigate good and bad practices and learn from a portfolio of unique megaprojects.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology combines quantitative and qualitative cross-comparison of case studies and statistical analysis into an iterative process.

Findings

Indeed, benchmarking offers significant potential to identify good and bad practices and improve the performance of project selection, planning, and delivery.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology is exemplified in this paper using the case of Nuclear Decommissioning Projects and Programmes (NDPs).

Originality/value

Indeed, due to their characteristics, NDPs can be addressed as megaprojects, and are a relevant example for the application of the methodology presented here that collects and investigates the characteristics that mostly impact the performance of (mega)projects, through a continuous learning process.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

171

Abstract

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

85

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Waled Shehata, Craig Langston, Marja Sarvimäki and Ranka Novak Camozzi

Many heritage-listed gaols in Australia have become obsolete in terms of their original function and were decommissioned decades ago. As a default management practice…

Abstract

Purpose

Many heritage-listed gaols in Australia have become obsolete in terms of their original function and were decommissioned decades ago. As a default management practice, decommissioned gaols are usually transformed into museums which are mostly empty and underused without considering other viable alternatives. This research challenges this mainstream thinking and demonstrates that among the entire stock of heritage-listed gaols in Australia, even the least ranked gaol in terms of its potential for reuse can be turned into a thriving and vibrant new function.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypothetically, if the least ranked Australian heritage-listed gaol in terms of its potential for reuse is in fact “reusable”, then the remaining heritage gaols have more chance of being successfully reused to accommodate a vibrant new function. To be able to test this hypothesis, first, the Adaptive Reuse Potential (ARP) model is applied to rank Australia's decommissioned heritage gaols which are spatially and structurally sound to accommodate new uses. Second, an architectural design concept was designed to adaptively reuse the lowest scored gaol (Richmond Gaol) to a boutique hotel. The conceptual design proposal was then assessed by three local heritage architecture firms to validate its applicability and viability.

Findings

The research showed that Richmond Gaol can be reused successfully to at least one function, and accordingly, the whole stock of heritage gaols can be expected to also be reused to more sustainable purposes. The research identifies several considerations for the reuse of heritage gaols in Australia: the careful intervention to their significant fabric; maintaining sufficient evidence of the gaol's original components, the importance of the new use being compatible to the gaol's morphology to ensure minimum alterations or demolitions in the significant fabric of the site; and evaluating the new use and its components to achieve financial viability.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the continuing closure of Tasmania's state borders amid the spread of the COVID-19 virus, the researchers were not able to travel to Tasmania to conduct a site visit and to run the in-depth interviews with the architects in person. Most of the data of the current status of the site, its current layout, museum elements, historical data and photos were provided by Heritage Authorities in Tasmania and the Tasmanian State Library and Archive Service. Supplementary information and photos were acquired in March 2020 from visitors of the gaol who uploaded their trip images to Google maps or to their travel blogs. Topographical data of the site was gathered from Topographic Base-map of Land Information System Richmond Tasmania (2020). Due to travel restrictions, in-depth interviews with the local architects were done virtually, or over the phone in one case.

Practical implications

Challenges discussed in this research encourage creating nationally designed support programs to better vitalise and help preserve Australia's carceral heritage.

Originality/value

This research utilises architectural design in an empirical research paradigm.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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