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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Julie A. Pirsch, Stacy Landreth Grau and Michael Jay Polonsky

The aim of this paper is to outline key social marketing issues apparent in deceptive weight‐loss advertising, from the perspective of government policy‐makers…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to outline key social marketing issues apparent in deceptive weight‐loss advertising, from the perspective of government policy‐makers, manufacturers, the media, and consumers. The purpose is to examine the complexity of one aspect of the obesity battle and provide a framework for coordinated and integrated social marketing initiatives from a multiple stakeholder perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The results of deceptive weight‐loss advertising are framed using the harm chain model, and the paper offers recommended solutions based on a framework of marketing, education and policy changes across the network of stakeholders.

Findings

This paper concludes that a resolution to the harm created by deceptive weight‐loss advertising can be achieved by the creation of a more holistic, system‐wide solution to this important health and policy issue. This networked approach must involve all aspects of harm in a multi‐stakeholder solution, including both upstream and downstream integration. Specific recommendations are made for policy‐makers, manufacturers, the media, and consumers to achieve this goal.

Social implications

From a marketing perspective, analyzing the issue of deceptive weight‐loss advertising using the harm chain allows for the creation of a more holistic, system‐wide solution involving stakeholders in all aspects of harm for this important health and policy issue.

Originality/value

This research examines the problem of obesity and weight‐loss advertising from the unique perspective of the harm chain framework. The authors make unified recommendations for various stakeholders including industry, media, government and consumers, in order to direct integrated social marketing and consumer‐oriented strategies within this industry.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

A. Shafiq, A. Haque, K. Abdullah and M.T. Jan

This paper aims to explore people’s beliefs towards Islamic advertising.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore people’s beliefs towards Islamic advertising.

Design/methodology/approach

Being exploratory in nature, this paper applies qualitative method of research by adapting thought elicitation technique of data collection. This method rests in the projective techniques of data collection and is also known as “word association technique”. It allows free thinking of respondents that helps in generating rich data which is most required in qualitative studies.

Findings

Various beliefs regarding Islamic advertising were extracted and categorized into different dimensions. These dimensions pertained to Islamic advertising’s possibility, nature, characteristics, real-time decisions and potential outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Being an exploratory study, the data are collected from a small sample, hence raising generalization issues. Though, the same opens avenue for future research in that these dimensions should be subject to validation via large sample size.

Practical implications

This research will help in developing a scale to measure attitudes towards Islamic advertising, which the researchers can use to find justification for using Islamic advertising. Such application has great implications for businesses, as Islamic advertising concept stands contrary to the contemporary practices.

Social implications

With a growing concern for business ethics, this research is an attempt to bring Islamic ethics into advertising practice. This will not only eradicate the ill-effects of contemporary advertising but also provide sound evidence for revising advertising policies.

Originality/value

It adds to the developing field of Islamic marketing, by being the first attempt of its kind in paving the way for Islamic advertising.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Gordon E. Miracle and Terence Nevett

Until the late 19th century, the controls on advertising in Britain and the US depended on complying with laws relating to defamation and on the ethical values of…

Abstract

Until the late 19th century, the controls on advertising in Britain and the US depended on complying with laws relating to defamation and on the ethical values of advertisers and media proprietors. During the 20th century, concerns about public safety from dangerous products or services, recognition of the need to safeguard people from misleading or untrue claims, and attempts to strike a balance in the interests of fair trading have led to movements for both self‐regulation, as well as some legal restrictions on marketing and advertising practices. Differences in British and American practices have arisen from the nature of the legal systems and the cultural mores of the respective societies.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Howard Johnson

It is undoubtedly the case that advertising plays a significant part in modern economic life in most societies and many view it as an essential part of the operation of a…

Abstract

It is undoubtedly the case that advertising plays a significant part in modern economic life in most societies and many view it as an essential part of the operation of a free market system. Yet it is also the case that our knowledge of how exactly it works and whether the vast amounts spent on it are justified is still uncertain. Lord Leverhulme, the founder of Lever Brothers, is credited with the famous aphorism — ‘one half of advertising does not work but nobody knows which half’ and that perhaps sums up the situation very well. One thing that is generally accepted is that some protection must be provided both to consumers and trade competitors from false or misleading advertising which can lead to market distortions and economic loss to purchasers. Increasingly controversial, however, is the scope and extent of legal and voluntary controls on advertising. In the advertising industry fears are rising about the volume of both national and EEC proposals to restrict or limit advertising and as we move from the '80s, a decade of conspicuous consumption in which advertising flourished, to the caring '90s where environmental issues are to the fore, the advertising industry faces major challenges. Advertising as a whole is facing severe economic and legal challenges after the massive expansion of the 1980's — it is estimated that there was a 4% fall in real terms in UK advertising expenditure in the first quarter of 1990 and an estimated 5% fall in the second quarter. Clients are becoming more demanding and the cosy cartel arrangement whereby advertising agencies made a 15% standard commission on a client's expenditure has gone — commissions are down to 12%‐13% or being replaced by fixed fees. It has been estimated by the Advertising Association that proposed legal restrictions could lead to a loss of £1 bn in revenue for the industry. Multi‐farious pressure groups are campaigning against drink advertising, cigarette advertising and sexism in adverts. The advertising industry's concerns are reflected in a recent report by the Advertising Association — ‘A Freedom Under Threat — Advertising in the EC’. The report indicates a number of areas where legislative controls have been introduced or are proposed to be introduced over the next few years and expresses the fear that controls may be going too far in limiting freedom of ‘commercial speech’. Martin Boase, chairman of the Advertising Association writes in his introduction to the report:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Martin Fojt

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Journal of Product & Brand Management is split into six sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Marketing…

Abstract

This special “Anbar Abstracts” issue of the Journal of Product & Brand Management is split into six sections covering abstracts under the following headings: Marketing strategy; Customer service; Pricing; Promotion; Marketing research, customer behavior; Product management.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Lori D. Wolin and Pradeep Korgaonkar

Previous research suggests males and females exhibit different beliefs about and attitudes toward traditional media advertising along with different advertising stimulated…

Abstract

Previous research suggests males and females exhibit different beliefs about and attitudes toward traditional media advertising along with different advertising stimulated consumer behaviors. However, little is known about gender differences in consumer beliefs about Web advertising versus other media, attitude toward Web advertising, or Web advertising associated consumer behavior. Survey results indicate males and females differ significantly on several dimensions with males exhibiting more positive beliefs about Web advertising and more positive attitudes toward Web advertising than females. Additionally, males are more likely than females to purchase from the Web and surf the Web for functional and entertainment reasons, whereas females are more likely to surf the Web for shopping reasons.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Brian T. Ratchford

The 2016 presidential campaign in the United States was marked by widespread interference by Russian agents. The interference was especially prominent in digital media…

Abstract

The 2016 presidential campaign in the United States was marked by widespread interference by Russian agents. The interference was especially prominent in digital media. This indicates the possible need for better regulation. To investigate the problem, I examined the legal and regulatory history of US Federal campaign regulation. While these regulations require various disclosures and disclaimers, and set some spending limits, they do not cover advertising messages. More to the point, the disclosure and disclaimer requirements for digital ads are limited and easily circumvented. Possibly because of this, political advertising in digital media has increased dramatically in recent years. I examine current proposals for improved regulation and make recommendations for changes in Federal regulation and in oversight by nonpartisan groups.

Details

Continuing to Broaden the Marketing Concept
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-824-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

John P. Foley

Summarises a report from the Pontifical Council for Social Communications on the state of ethics in advertising worldwide. Begins with the assertion that advertising

Abstract

Summarises a report from the Pontifical Council for Social Communications on the state of ethics in advertising worldwide. Begins with the assertion that advertising profoundly impacts the way people understand themselves and the world around them. It then looks at the potential benefits of advertising on society and the harm done by advertising. Then identifies moral principles that are essential for ethical advertising. Finally, looks at who is responsible for ensuring that advertising is ethical.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

William L. Wilkie and Patrick E. Murphy

The purpose of this article is to present an inside look at the history of a little‐known but interesting initiative in the marketing field, one that involved the infusion…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to present an inside look at the history of a little‐known but interesting initiative in the marketing field, one that involved the infusion of marketing thought into public policy decision‐making in the USA. It aims to trace the interesting tale of how marketing academics came to be included in the activities of the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) through the FTC's “Marketing Academic Consultancy Program” (MACP) during the 1970s. This story also aims to include descriptions of the contributions made by those marketing academics and how those scholars were later phased out of the FTC.

Design/methodology/approach

An autobiographical approach is used since each of the authors was personally involved in the MACP. As participants in the program and as scholars whose careers were thereafter tremendously affected by that participation, these personal accounts provide considerable insight into the impact on both FTC operations and on marketing academic thought itself.

Findings

Over the decade of the 1970s some 30 marketing academics participated in this program, with considerable impact on both FTC operations and on marketing academic thought itself. Reflecting positive impact within public policy, for example, was a massive increase in the FTC budget for marketing and consumer research activities – from essentially zero at the start of the program to some $ 1 million in 1978. Benefits also flowed back into academia, as this program formed a prime basis for the development of today's “Marketing and Society” research area.

Originality/value

Although there are histories of the FTC, this is an original, first‐hand account of a little‐known era during which marketing academics and public policy decision‐makers were given a unique opportunity to work together and learn from each other. It offers personal insights into the workings of this innovative program and the benefits that accrued for both the FTC and for the marketing discipline.

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2011

Sylvie Jean

The use of aggressive media campaigns to parody a competitor is a relatively recent development. The aim of this study is to gauge the consequences of parody on attitudes…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of aggressive media campaigns to parody a competitor is a relatively recent development. The aim of this study is to gauge the consequences of parody on attitudes towards the brand that is the victim of the parody.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collection was carried out in an experiment design in two steps (before and after brand parody exposure) in order to measure the effects of a parody exposition on brand‐parodied attitude.

Findings

The results show that average level of attitude toward the brand parodied is significantly different after exposure to the advertisement that parodies it. Thus, the average level of attitude toward the brand parodied is significantly different in accordance with the degree to which those exposed to parodies are subject to feelings of anti‐commercial rebellion.

Practical implications

This study shows that a brand parody communication by playing negative humour with an anti‐commercial style represents a real threat for the brand parodied.

Originality/value

This research measured the effect of parody on attitude toward the brand parodied by its competitor. For this, the original materials were used (iPod advertising and iPod parody advertising made by its competitor).

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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