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Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-867-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Debra Hayes, Pam Christie, Martin Mills and Bob Lingard

This paper draws on a three‐year study of 24 schools involving classroom observations and interviews with teachers and principals. Through an examination of three cases…

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7056

Abstract

This paper draws on a three‐year study of 24 schools involving classroom observations and interviews with teachers and principals. Through an examination of three cases, sets of leadership practices that focus on the learning of both students and teachers are described. This set of practices is called productive leadership and how these practices are dispersed among productive leaders in three schools is described. This form of leadership supports the achievement of both academic and social outcomes through a focus on pedagogy, a culture of care and related organizational processes. The concepts of learning organisations and teacher professional learning communities as ways of framing relationships in schools, in which ongoing teacher learning is complementary to student learning, are espoused.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Bob Lingard, Debra Hayes and Martin Mills

This history of the politics of moves towards school‐based management in Queensland education is located within a broader historical and political analysis of such moves…

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2755

Abstract

This history of the politics of moves towards school‐based management in Queensland education is located within a broader historical and political analysis of such moves across Australia since the Karmel Report. This paper specifically focuses in on developments in Queensland. The Queensland analysis traces the moves from Labor’s Focus on Schools through the Coalition’s Leading Schools and the most recent Labor rearticulation in the document Future Directions for School‐based Management in Queensland State Schools. The analysis demonstrates that the concept of school‐based management has no stipulative meaning, but rather is a contested concept. More generally, the paper provides an account and analysis of new forms of governance in educational systems and the tension between centralising and decentralising tendencies as school‐based management is adopted in order to address a number of competing policy objectives.

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Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2009

Raewyn Connell

The industrial realities of teaching are documented in history, sociology and policy research: studies of the school as workplace, the tools of teaching, processes within…

Abstract

The industrial realities of teaching are documented in history, sociology and policy research: studies of the school as workplace, the tools of teaching, processes within the workplace, the changing composition of the teaching workforce, the gender politics of the occupation, teacher organisations, and change in teachers’ work and employment relations. Teaching as a form of work is difficult to pin down because it involves an unspecifiable object of labour, a limitless labour process, and is, in a sense, unteachable. Teaching is always transformative labour, bringing new social realities into existence; and is also fundamentally interactive, not individual. Teachers’ work is not social reproduction, but is creative and therefore a site of social struggle. This can be seen in education in colonial societies, and in the global transformation of the education of girls and women. Teachers are now caught up in the neoliberal agenda, often unwillingly ‐ but since neoliberalism transforms institutions in the public sector, unavoidably, and sometimes traumatically. In a long historical perspective, the modern teaching workforce is unique, and has the possibility of shaping the learning capacities of the whole society; this may now be uniquely important.

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History of Education Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Debra G. Smith

Confidentiality in adoption has been the norm in this country since the 1930s. Traditionally, it has been perceived as beneficial to all sides of the adoption triangle…

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77

Abstract

Confidentiality in adoption has been the norm in this country since the 1930s. Traditionally, it has been perceived as beneficial to all sides of the adoption triangle: the adoptive parents, the adoptee, and the birth parents. Adoption agencies have supported the policy of confidentiality, and as a result the practice of concealment is almost universal in the United States. Alaska, Hawaii, and Kansas are the only states that allow adult adoptees access to their birth and adoption information.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Tegan Piggford, Maria Raciti, Debra Harker and Michael Harker

Understanding the drivers of young adults' healthy food choices is vital to addressing the public health issue of obesity. The healthy eating motives that underlay such…

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2816

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding the drivers of young adults' healthy food choices is vital to addressing the public health issue of obesity. The healthy eating motives that underlay such consumer choice behavior are particularly important to the well‐being of society. This research is novel in that it aims to investigate the food motives of young Australian adults in relation to five socio‐demographic factors, namely place of residence, gender, age, gross income and work hours. While overseas studies have examined some of these factors, the Australian context and its nuances is one that is notably absent. Thus, this research aims to provide meaningful contributions to the extant literature from an Australian perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study of 18 to 24‐year‐old Australians, quantitative data from a total of 310 respondents (93.7 percent response rate) were collected using quota sampling.

Findings

The paper finds that gender and work hours significantly influenced food motives; however, place of residence, age and gross income while successful with young adults in other countries, did not influence healthy food choices in Australia.

Research limitations/implications

While the findings corroborate some aspects of overseas studies, they contradict others and also add new information. Collectively, they contribute useful insights for social marketing intervention strategies concerned with influencing food choice among young Australian consumers.

Originality/value

This study indicates that intervention campaigns that are based upon residence, age and gross income in relation to healthy eating, while possibly successful with young adults in other countries, are likely to be ineffective in Australia.

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Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Abstract

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Followership in Action
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-947-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Anurag Sharma, Debra L. Shapiro and Idalene F. Kesner

In this paper, findings from the negotiation literature are tested in the context of mergers. Firms' relative threat capacity, surveillance by constituents, accountability…

Abstract

In this paper, findings from the negotiation literature are tested in the context of mergers. Firms' relative threat capacity, surveillance by constituents, accountability to constituents, and the attractiveness of initial offers are shown to predict management's resistance to mergers in a manner consistent with theories in the negotiation literature. The pattern of predicted two‐way and three‐way interactions support speculations and findings previously reported in the negotiation literature as well. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2013

Michael Schwartz and Debra R. Comer

We argue that Oskar Schindler is a moral exemplar. Oskar Schindler and other moral exemplars should, according to Mayo, be emulated. Emulating Schindler when he acted as a…

Abstract

We argue that Oskar Schindler is a moral exemplar. Oskar Schindler and other moral exemplars should, according to Mayo, be emulated. Emulating Schindler when he acted as a moral exemplar could have led to others’ being helped during truly terrible times. Yet, had officialdom at that time known what Schindler was doing, he would have lost his life, and the lives of the many others he was able to save – as well as their progeny – would also have been lost. Thus, we underscore that it can be extraordinarily difficult for someone to be recognised as a moral exemplar when a moral exemplar is so desperately needed.

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Moral Saints and Moral Exemplars
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-075-8

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Deborah Hurst, Shelley MacDougall and Chris Pelham

While there is no definitive profile of the successful entrepreneur or prescribed pathway for success, research suggests that individuals who proactively accommodate…

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2411

Abstract

Purpose

While there is no definitive profile of the successful entrepreneur or prescribed pathway for success, research suggests that individuals who proactively accommodate factors that push and pull them into entrepreneurship, align their personal and entrepreneurial visions, and to some extent, build emotional intelligence (EQ), are more likely to succeed. This paper aims to describe an entrepreneur counseling process developed and used by the Acadia Centre for Social and Business Entrepreneurship (ACSBE), located in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose an entrepreneur's success, negotiation of push and pull factors, and EQ are all linked, and the ACSBE counseling model draws on these. The case study method was used. ACSBE staffs were interviewed regarding the entrepreneur counseling process, counselor‐training sessions were observed and documents were reviewed. Two ACSBE clients, who together started a successful fair‐trade business, were interviewed for their insights regarding the ACSBE counseling model and their own experiences starting their business.

Findings

The responses of the ACSBE clients illustrate a successful application of the ACSBE Entrepreneurial Decision Making Cycle©. Their personal values, business strategies and performance were linked to promote success personally and for society. Both entrepreneurs were authentic, self‐aware and empathetic individuals who were able to hone their EQ and develop sound business acumen with assistance of the ACSBE counseling model.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis of the ACSBE counseling model and its success in this case leads to the question of whether the application of the ACSBE Entrepreneurial Decision Making Cycle can predict those more likely to succeed in an entrepreneurial venture. In order to address this, further research of the ACSBE decision tool is recommended.

Originality/value

The ACSBE Entrepreneurial Decision Making Cycle is unique. It should be of interest to entrepreneur counselors and researchers of entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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