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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen, Francine Schlosser and Deborah Zinni

This study aims to employ a resource‐oriented theoretical perspective to examine retirees' desire to return to their former organization.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to employ a resource‐oriented theoretical perspective to examine retirees' desire to return to their former organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross‐sectional field study design, data were collected from 243 retirees under 65 years of age who had been retired from a career job less than ten years.

Findings

Regression results indicate that retirees who had experienced financial and pervasive role loss as well as retirees who perceived a higher fit with their former organization and the availability of desired job role options expressed significantly greater interest in returning. Retirees who experienced gains in leaving work as well as gains in their life satisfaction following retirement reported significantly less interest in returning to their former organization.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design and self‐report data create a potential for bias. Even though the findings are based on respondents' “interest” in returning to their former organization, it is not known if they actually did return.

Practical implications

Programs should focus on creating an environment that values older workers, and provides them with opportunities such as mentoring other workers.

Social implications

Policy changes are needed to ensure that returning to work following retirement results in resource gains and not resource losses.

Originality/value

This study uses resource theory with a diverse sample of retirees and considers their desire to return to their original employers, thus adding value to human resources and management who wish to retain or re‐engage their own knowledgeable retirees.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2012

Francine Schlosser, Deborah Zinni and Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen

The purpose of this study is to identify antecedents of intentions to unretire among a group of retirees that included both those who had not returned to the workforce…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify antecedents of intentions to unretire among a group of retirees that included both those who had not returned to the workforce since their retirement and those who had previously unretired.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional survey collected data from 460 recent retirees between the ages of 50 and 70.

Findings

Results of hierarchical regression indicated that retirees are more likely to remain retired if they feel financially secure and have a positive retirement experience. Conversely, they are more likely to intend to return to the workforce if they experience financial worries, wish to upgrade their skills or miss aspects of their former jobs.

Practical implications

Aging boomers who anticipate early retirement have created a dwindling labor pool. Simultaneously, the global pension crisis has impacted on the financial decisions of retirees. A trend to abolish mandatory retirement and/or increase mandatory age in various countries provides individuals with more freedom in their retirement decisions. Accordingly, managers must be creative in their HR planning strategies to retain or recruit skilled retirees.

Originality/value

Previous research has addressed retirement as a final stage, however, given simultaneous global demographic changes and economic concerns, this study provides new knowledge regarding the factors that push and pull retirees to participate in the labor market.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Francine Schlosser, Deborah M. Zinni and Andrew Templer

Resource constraints in the Canadian publicly funded healthcare system have created a need for more volunteer leaders to effectively manage other volunteers. Self-concept…

Abstract

Resource constraints in the Canadian publicly funded healthcare system have created a need for more volunteer leaders to effectively manage other volunteers. Self-concept theory has been conceptualized and applied within a volunteer context, and the views of healthcare stakeholders, such as volunteers, volunteer leaders, and supervisors, triangulated to form an understanding of the attitudes and behaviors of volunteer leaders. We propose that leaders are differentiated from others by how they view their roles in the organization and their ability to make a difference in these roles. This interpretation can be informed by self-concept theory because each individual's notion of self-concept influences how employees see themselves, how they react to experiences, and how they allow these experiences to shape their motivation. A small case study profiles a volunteer leader self-concept that includes a proactive, learning-oriented attitude, capitalizing on significant prior work experience to fulfill a sense of obligation to the institution and its patients, and demands a high level of respect from paid employees.

Details

Biennial Review of Health Care Management: Meso Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-673-7

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Abstract

Details

Biennial Review of Health Care Management: Meso Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-673-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Deborah McPhee, Mark Julien, Diane Miller and Barry Wright

Drawing upon the theoretical concept of social identities, the purpose of this paper is to investigate if an aboriginal employee resource group (ERG) helps to improve…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the theoretical concept of social identities, the purpose of this paper is to investigate if an aboriginal employee resource group (ERG) helps to improve connectedness between the participants of the ERG and the organization in a Canadian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was used to interview 13 members of this ERG situated within a large Canadian bank.

Findings

The ERG created a positive experience for its members. It provided a bridge between the aboriginal identity and the organizational identity. Those who were part of the ERG felt that it encouraged them to bond to their cultural identity and that it also generated affirmative connections to the organization.

Practical implications

For employers seeking a more diverse workforce who have struggled with retaining employees from marginalized groups, ERGs may prove helpful.

Originality/value

This study posits a theoretical perspective of how ERGs are able to connect minority members to organizations through the recognition of dual identities. This is also the first study to examine the benefits of an aboriginal ERG.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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