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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Deborah L. Cowles

Takes an in‐depth look at the meaning of trust in customer relationships by drawing from the economics and communications literatures, where researchers distinguish…

Abstract

Takes an in‐depth look at the meaning of trust in customer relationships by drawing from the economics and communications literatures, where researchers distinguish between concepts of trustworthiness and trusting behaviour. Develops a typology of trust based on whether a marketing entity is considered trustworthy and whether a behaviour can be considered trusting, and offers the managerial implications of ideas presented, along with six propositions for future research. The perspective presented here suggests that marketing researchers must first come to terms with the meaning of trust in customer relationships before they can begin to understand its role in more comprehensive, explanatory models of customer behaviour.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Stephen W. Brown, Deborah L. Cowles and Tracy L. Tuten

Contributes to a growing body of service recovery knowledge by examining the impact of service recovery as a relationship tool, in addition to its well‐accepted role as a…

Abstract

Contributes to a growing body of service recovery knowledge by examining the impact of service recovery as a relationship tool, in addition to its well‐accepted role as a means to enhance customer satisfaction at the transaction‐specific level. Begins by providing an overview of the evolving concept of service recovery and continues by explaining the important and unique role that recovery plays in the service sector. A comparison of the concept of service consistency and reliability with the concept of service recovery leads to a statement of hypotheses tested in an experimental setting. Specifically, results indicate that while service recovery results in encounter satisfaction, service recovery does not significantly influence overall satisfaction, quality, image and future expectations. Rather, consistency of service influences these constructs.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

F.G. Crane

Discusses how corporate advertising has attracted increasedattention during recent years, especially in service industries.Addresses the issue of corporate advertising in…

Abstract

Discusses how corporate advertising has attracted increased attention during recent years, especially in service industries. Addresses the issue of corporate advertising in relation to financial services. Uses a case study to illustrate a successful integration of corporate advertising with product advertising.Concludes with managerial implications and recommendations, finding that corporate advertising should be an integral component of the marketing communications programme of a financial services institution.

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Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Deborah J. Morris, Shubhinder Shergill and Elizabeth Beber

People with an intellectual disability (ID) are more at risk of experiencing adverse childhood events. Moreover, prolonged exposure to ACEs results in enduring changes and…

Abstract

Purpose

People with an intellectual disability (ID) are more at risk of experiencing adverse childhood events. Moreover, prolonged exposure to ACEs results in enduring changes and impairments in neurological, physiological and psycho-social systems and functioning. In response, van der Kolk et al. (2009) have put forward the concept of developmental trauma disorder (DTD) to reflect the “constellation of enduring symptoms” and complex care needs of this population. The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the level of exposure to adverse childhood events and the prevalence of DTD in an inpatient forensic ID population.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective file review and consensus approach to diagnosis were used in a sample of adults with an ID detained in a secure forensic service.

Findings

Results revealed that 89 admissions (N=123) had been exposed to at least one significant ACE, with 81 being exposed to prolonged ACEs. A total of 58 admissions (47 per cent) met criteria for PTSD and 80 (65 per cent) met the criteria for DTD. Significant gender differences were noted in MHA status, primary psychiatric diagnoses, exposure to ACEs and DTD.

Research limitations/implications

The discussion explores the implications for working with forensic ID populations who report high incidents of childhood trauma and the utility, strengths and weaknesses of the proposed DTD, its relationship to ID diagnoses is explored.

Originality/value

The study outlines the prevalence of DTD and PTSD in ID forensic populations and suggests additional key assessment and treatment needs for this population.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

K. Douglas Hoffman and Thomas N. Ingram

Considers the impact of multi‐faceted measures of job satisfactionon customer‐oriented behaviours demonstrated by service providers.Reveals how overall job satisfaction…

Abstract

Considers the impact of multi‐faceted measures of job satisfaction on customer‐oriented behaviours demonstrated by service providers. Reveals how overall job satisfaction, together with specific satisfaction related to supervision, colleagues, promotion and work are positively related to customer‐orientation, while satisfaction with pay is not of significance in this case. Discusses recommendations for management and suggestions for further research.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Deborah F. Spake and Carol M. Megehee

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of consumer sociability and service provider perceived expertise on service relationship success.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of consumer sociability and service provider perceived expertise on service relationship success.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 281 consumers in the USA, randomly selected with the assistance of a commercial list service, completed the survey. Structural equations modeling, was used to test the proposed model.

Findings

The findings show that customer sociability and service provider expertise are important to relationship success. In addition, the duration of the relationship was found to be a consequence of satisfaction and a driver of social benefits, which strengthens customer commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Personality traits have been previously examined in a low involvement retail setting and not found to be a significant influence on commitment. This study finds that sociability does have a significant impact on service relationship success; thus, providing support for the importance of customer traits in relationship marketing in some contexts.

Practical implications

While provider characteristics are expected to influence customer commitment, this study provides evidence that at least one consumer personality trait (i.e. sociability) appears to impact commitment to a provider in high involvement services. Healthcare providers should be aware that the personality of the patient may be a driver of satisfaction with and commitment to the physician, despite the doctor's perceived level of expertise.

Originality/value

This research fills a gap in the literature on the link between customer traits and service relationships in a healthcare setting. Since consumers are co‐participants in service delivery, it is important to understand how their characteristics impact service relationship success.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

S.W.S.B. Dasanayaka, Omar Al Serhan, Mina Glambosky and Kimberly Gleason

This study aims to identify and analyze factors affecting the business-to-business (B2B) relationship between Sri Lankan telecommunication operators and vendors. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and analyze factors affecting the business-to-business (B2B) relationship between Sri Lankan telecommunication operators and vendors. The authors conduct a survey and develop models to explain relationship strength and satisfaction. The authors find that telecommunication operators and vendors value trust, commitment, adaptation and communication. Operator satisfaction varies by perception of product quality, service support, delivery performance, supplier know-how and value for money. The vendor’s relationship strength is impacted by trust and commitment; vendor satisfaction is affected by economic factors and referencing. The authors suggest formulating management strategies using these results to strengthen business relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop two conceptual models to analyze the supplier and customer perspectives. This study’s drafted models were drawn from established models and were presented to experts in the industry, both telecommunication operators and vendors. Models were modified based on experts’ feedback, and hypotheses were developed from the conceptual models, developed separately for the two perspectives. Data collection was done via questionnaires; 150 questionnaires were sent via email to identified telecommunication operators and 100 questionnaires were sent via email to identified telecommunication vendors, with follow-up emails and telephone calls to improve response rates.

Findings

This study’s findings show that employees in the telecommunication industry recognize the importance of B2B relationships. Employees of both telecommunication operators and vendors agree that stronger relationships are advantageous. The correlation and regression analysis results identify factors that affect the B2B relationship. The following factors impact the strength of B2B relationships irrespective of view point: trust, commitment and satisfaction. The following factors were found to significantly affect the strength of B2B relationships between telecommunication operators and vendors from the operator perspective: adaptation and communication.

Practical implications

To enhance relationship strength, the management of operator organizations should take action to improve trust, commitment and satisfaction. Demonstrating honesty and integrity when dealing with vendors and exhibiting concern for the other party’s interests can help establish trust or enhance trust in existing relationships. Displaying commitment toward the vendor will also facilitate stronger relationships. Reasonable profits for both parties and sizeable business volume will also help satisfy vendors, increasing relationship strength. Positive referencing of the vendor in industrial and public forums will improve vendor satisfaction, enhancing relationship strength. Reputational capital can be built and maintained for both operators and vendors by keeping promises and defending the other party to outsiders. For managers of telecommunications operators and vendors in other emerging markets, this study’s results are important and can inform internal business practices to support trust, commitment and satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature in two ways, a focus on the telecommunication industry and a previously unexplored emerging market, Sri Lanka. In addition, this study includes an analysis of the relationship from both the operator and vendor perspectives.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Vishal Vyas and Sonika Raitani

This paper aims to probe into the linkages between the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of banks and the cross-buying intentions of banking customers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to probe into the linkages between the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of banks and the cross-buying intentions of banking customers. Though the authors could not find any direct link between these two concepts on theoretical ground, but an effort has been made to identify the impact of CSR on cross-buying intentions through corporate reputation and relationship quality. Like other industries, the Indian banking industry has also witnessed a balance between its social-environmental responsibilities and its clearly defined economic responsibility to earn profit.

Design/methodology/approach

The universe for the present study constitutes the customers of the entire Indian banking industry. Considering the cost and time constraints, the study was limited to a sample of 347 public and private bank customers in the Rajasthan region based on the convenience sampling method. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and analyzed through structural equation modeling. CSR measures included philanthropic and ethical responsibility.

Findings

Results revealed that corporate reputation and relationship quality both play a mediating role in the linkages between CSR and cross-buying intentions.

Practical implications

The study suggests integrating marketing strategy with its CSR strategies to encourage cross-buying intentions. While making the cross-selling agenda, they should bear reputation in mind because at the relationship development phase, customers generally rely on reputation than their evaluation of bank’s products for cross-buying.

Originality/value

This study is the first in marketing literature which relates the concept of CSR and the cross-buying.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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