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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Deborah J. Barrett

Whether organizational change results from a merger, acquisition, new venture, new process improvement approach, or any number of flavors‐of‐the‐day management fads…

Abstract

Whether organizational change results from a merger, acquisition, new venture, new process improvement approach, or any number of flavors‐of‐the‐day management fads, employee communications can mean the success or failure of any major change program. The Strategic Employee Communication Model with the best practice definitions, which are composites of effective employee communication examples collected from researching selected Fortune 500 companies, help management understand the strategic role of employee communication in a high‐performing company. The model functions as an analytical tool to diagnose a company’s strengths and weaknesses in employee communication so that the company can structure the change communication program and position communication to facilitate the overall change program. In this paper, I explain the Strategic Employee Communication Model and best practice definitions, demonstrate a change communication approach to improving employee communications using the Strategic Employee Communication Model, and provide a case study of the successful use of the model and approach during a major change program.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Deborah J. Barrett

This article is designed to help senior managers be better leaders by being better communicators. The article explains my original concept of “leadership communication”…

Abstract

Purpose

This article is designed to help senior managers be better leaders by being better communicators. The article explains my original concept of “leadership communication” and provides an original framework to help map out the levels of communication ability business leaders need, including developing a positive ethos and emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives are achieved by providing specific and practical definitions and illustrations. The article is based on research on leadership, communication, and emotional intelligence and on extensive experience coaching and working with executives.

Findings

I found that the best business leaders share similar, specific characteristics of good communication that fall into three major groups: core (strategy, writing, speaking), managerial (emotional intelligence, listening, coaching, teams, meetings), and corporate (communicating with all internal and external stakeholders).

Research limitations/implications

Future research could include further developing the leadership communication concept by adding to the framework as I discover other major capabilities needed by business leaders.

Practical implications

All managers can apply my definition of leadership communication and my framework. I have witnessed the improvement managers can make in their leadership ability by focusing on the communication capabilities discussed in my article.

Originality/value

My concept, definition, and framework are all new. The value is in helping managers improve their communication abilities and recognize the importance of emotional intelligence in effective business communication. It is important for all managers and for teachers/coaches who work with them as well.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

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Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Michael Lounsbury, Deborah A. Anderson and Paul Spee

Volumes 70 and 71 of Research in the Sociology of Organizations combine to comprise cutting edge theory and empirical scholarship at the interface of practice and…

Abstract

Volumes 70 and 71 of Research in the Sociology of Organizations combine to comprise cutting edge theory and empirical scholarship at the interface of practice and institution in organization studies. As we highlight, this interface has spurred particularly generative conversations with many open questions, and much to explore. We provide a review of scholarly developments in practice theory and organizational institutionalism that have given rise to this interest in building a bridge between scholarly communities. As signaled by recent efforts to construct a practice-driven institutionalism, we highlight how connecting practice theory with the institutional logics perspective provides a particularly attractive focal point for scholarship at this interface due to a variety of shared ontological and epistemological commitments, including the constitution of actors and their behavior. Collectively, the papers assembled unlock exciting opportunities to connect distinct, but related scholarly communities on practice and institution, seeding scholarship that can advance our understanding of organizational and societal dynamics.

Details

On Practice and Institution: New Empirical Directions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-416-5

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Michael Lounsbury, Deborah A. Anderson and Paul Spee

Volumes 70 and 71 of Research in the Sociology of Organizations combine to comprise cutting edge theory and empirical scholarship at the interface of practice and…

Abstract

Volumes 70 and 71 of Research in the Sociology of Organizations combine to comprise cutting edge theory and empirical scholarship at the interface of practice and institution in organization studies. As we highlight, this interface has spurred particularly generative conversations with many open questions, and much to explore. We provide a review of scholarly developments in practice theory and organizational institutionalism that have given rise to this interest in building a bridge between scholarly communities. As signaled by recent efforts to construct a practice-driven institutionalism, we highlight how connecting practice theory with the institutional logics perspective provides a particularly attractive focal point for scholarship at this interface due to a variety of shared ontological and epistemological commitments, including the constitution of actors and their behavior. Collectively, the papers assembled unlock exciting opportunities to connect distinct, but related scholarly communities on practice and institution, seeding scholarship that can advance our understanding of organizational and societal dynamics.

Details

On Practice and Institution: Theorizing the Interface
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-413-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Harriet Bradley and Gail Hebson

Questions why the analysis of class is being overlooked in the sociological mainstream. Presents some symptoms of this development followed by an evaluation. Suggests some…

Abstract

Questions why the analysis of class is being overlooked in the sociological mainstream. Presents some symptoms of this development followed by an evaluation. Suggests some new directions for class research which could appeal to younger researchers. Advocates work in this area to bridge the lack of information now available.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Jan Keane

Abstract

Details

National Identity and Education in Early Twentieth Century Australia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-246-6

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Mary Barrett

The purpose of this paper is to study women’s entrepreneurship from the family-firm context and radical subjectivist (RS) economics. While women’s entrepreneurship is a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study women’s entrepreneurship from the family-firm context and radical subjectivist (RS) economics. While women’s entrepreneurship is a long-standing topic of research interest, there have been calls for more theory-oriented research and research which takes context factors in women’s entrepreneurship seriously. The paper responds to this by using an RS’s view of economics as a theoretical lens to consider women’s entrepreneurship in family firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper briefly reviews the potential of the family-firm context for examining women’s entrepreneurship in a non-reductive fashion, then outlines radical subjectivism (RS). The three main elements of RS’s “entrepreneurial imagination” are explained, then linked with other theories of family-firm behaviour and applied to casework on women entrepreneurs in family firms.

Findings

Each element of the entrepreneurial imagination, empathy, modularity and self-organization, generates new research questions which contest previous apparently settled views about women entrepreneurs. Protocols for investigating the questions are suggested. The third element, self-organization, while more difficult to operationalize for empirical testing, suggests how women’s entrepreneurship might generate new industries.

Research limitations/implications

While this is primarily a conceptual study, its case studies invite further exploration of both women entrepreneurs and family firms. The RS perspective could also increase understanding of shared leadership and innovation in family firms. Specific research questions and protocols for investigating them are offered.

Practical implications

Insights from the research have practical implications for entrepreneurship education, for understanding entrepreneurship at the level of society, the firm and the individual.

Social implications

The importance of both family firms and women entrepreneurs to society makes it important to understand both of them better. The RS perspective can help.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the value of combining attention to entrepreneurial context (family firms) and theory (RS) to reinvigorate some old research questions about women entrepreneurs. The combination of family firms and RS is also novel.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Naresh K. Malhotra

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

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