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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Emily Vardell and Deborah H. Charbonneau

This study investigates the intersections of health and social justice topics in the library and information science (LIS) curriculum. Course offerings from 60 American…

Abstract

This study investigates the intersections of health and social justice topics in the library and information science (LIS) curriculum. Course offerings from 60 American Library Association-Accredited LIS programs were extracted and comprised the study sample. Using a thematic content analysis, a total of 220 course descriptions were analyzed to assess the inclusion of health justice topics. A main finding was that only eight LIS course descriptions closely integrated health and social justice issues. In addition, four overarching thematic areas of LIS courses were identified from the dataset as conceptual pathways with the potential to further incorporate health justice aspects in LIS coursework. Recommendations for how to expand course offerings in these areas are explored. Overall, these preliminary findings help to map the existing health and social justice curricula and contribute the LIS educator viewpoint for both reducing health disparities and advancing health justice conversations.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Beth St. Jean, Paul T. Jaeger, Gagan Jindal and Yuting Liao

This chapter introduces the focus of this volume – the many ways in which libraries and librarians are helping to increase people’s health literacy and reduce health…

Abstract

This chapter introduces the focus of this volume – the many ways in which libraries and librarians are helping to increase people’s health literacy and reduce health disparities in their communities. The rampant and rapidly increasing health injustices that occur every day throughout the world are, in large part, caused and exacerbated by health information injustice – something which libraries and librarians are playing an instrumental role in addressing by ensuring the physical and intellectual accessibility of information for all. This chapter opens with an introduction to the central concepts of health justice and health information injustice, focusing on the many information-related factors that shape the degree to which individuals have the information they need to be able to have a sufficient and truly equitable chance to live a long and healthy life. Next, the authors present a timely case study to emphasize the importance of health information justice, looking at the dire importance of health literacy as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic. The authors then provide a brief glimpse into their 13 contributed chapters, grouped into five categories: (1) Public Libraries/Healthy Communities; (2) Health Information Assessment; (3) Overcoming Barriers to Health Information Access; (4) Serving Disadvantaged Populations; and (5) Health Information as a Communal Asset. In conclusion, the authors discuss their aims for this volume, particularly that readers will become more aware of librarians’ efforts to address health disparities in their communities and excited about participating in and expanding these efforts, moving us closer to health justice.

Details

Roles and Responsibilities of Libraries in Increasing Consumer Health Literacy and Reducing Health Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-341-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Ori Eyal and Guy Roth

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between educational leadership and teacher's motivation. The research described here was anchored in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between educational leadership and teacher's motivation. The research described here was anchored in the convergence of two fundamental theories of leadership and motivation: the full range model of leadership and self‐determination theory. The central hypotheses were that transformational leadership would predict autonomous motivation among teachers, whereas transactional leadership would predict controlled motivation. The authors further predicted that autonomous motivation would mediate the relations between transformational leadership and teachers' burnout and that controlled motivation would mediate the relations between transactional leadership and burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires assessing the variables of interest were completed by 122 Israeli teachers.

Findings

Results, based on structure equation modeling, supported the hypotheses, suggesting that leadership styles among school principals play a significant role in teachers' motivation and well‐being.

Research limitations/implications

The school's environment in Western society is characterized by many impositions and pressures that affect teachers' well‐being, as reflected in their quality and intensity of motivation, affect, and burnout. Thus, the present research findings suggest that if the power in educational systems is delegated to school principals, and if the latter are encouraged and trained to be autonomy supportive toward their educational staff, then these steps may potentially facilitate teachers' autonomous motivation, satisfaction, and well‐being.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined the relationship between various styles of leadership and different types of motivation among followers. The present novel study has the potential to fill this gap by empirically studying the relationship between educational leadership and teachers' motivation.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1996

Julian Barling, Inez Dekker, Catherine A. Loughlin, E. Kevin Kelloway, Clive Fullagar and Deborah Johnson

Develops, tests and replicates a model of workplace sexual harassment and its personal and organizational consequences. The frequency of sexual harassment experiences…

Abstract

Develops, tests and replicates a model of workplace sexual harassment and its personal and organizational consequences. The frequency of sexual harassment experiences predict workplace negative mood which, in turn, predicts psychosomatic wellbeing, turnover intentions and interpersonal (i.e. co‐worker and supervisor) job dissatisfaction. Using LISREL VIII, shows that the model fits the data for a sample of employed Canadian females (n = 202), but not for a sample of employed Canadian males (n = 137). Finally, an analogous model suggesting that sexual harassment predicts negative mood which, in turn, predicts self‐esteem, concentration difficulties and grades, fit the data for a sample of 120 female undergraduate students. Discusses conceptual and practical implications, and future research directions.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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