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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Ting Jin, Wei Shao, Deborah Griffin and Mitchell Ross

This study aims to explore the perceptions about Chinese brands from the point of views of young Chinese consumers.

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1034

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the perceptions about Chinese brands from the point of views of young Chinese consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative method is used including focus groups and in-depth personal interviews with young Chinese consumers who are currently living and working in Australia.

Findings

Two key findings emerge from the results, namely, young Chinese consumers attach symbolic values to Chinese brands and Chinese brands are perceived positively by young Chinese consumers.

Research limitations/implications

This study demonstrates that symbolic values (such as pride, lifestyle, feeling of home and being happy) constitute one of the primary motivations for young Chinese consumers’ purchase of domestic brands. The results of this study challenge the traditional view that Chinese brands are perceived negatively in the Chinese market.

Originality/value

This is one of the very few studies investigating how young Chinese consumers perceive brands from their home country rather than foreign brands.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Aron O'Cass and Deborah Griffin

While social marketing has been utilised to bring about positive social change, ultimately, the decision to engage in prosocial behaviour resides with the individual. The…

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1013

Abstract

Purpose

While social marketing has been utilised to bring about positive social change, ultimately, the decision to engage in prosocial behaviour resides with the individual. The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants and outcomes of prosocial behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

A web-based self-administered survey was used to collect data from a convenience sample of largely university staff and students. Data obtained were analysed using SEM-based partial least squares methodology.

Findings

The results show that individuals who are future oriented and issue involved are more likely to engage in prosocial behaviour. Also, these individuals are more likely to assess fewer negative consequences and experience more positive feelings as a result of their prosocial behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

While the study focuses on two social issues, it does provide some explanation of self-reported behaviour, rather than intention to behave. However, future research could pay attention to a wider array of social issues and undertake post hoc testing to measure the characteristics of the chosen social issues. This may enhance findings, and provide greater support for the generalisability of the model. Also, future research could be directed towards the examining the role of perceived risk and feelings as an outcome of behaviour.

Practical implications

A better understanding of the prosocial individual can assist in designing more effective social marketing campaigns. In particular, focusing on positive feelings as a result of engaging in prosocial behaviour has practical implications.

Originality/value

Little attention has been given in the marketing and consumer behaviour literature to understanding the prosocial individual. To this end, this research empirically tests a model of prosocial behaviour for two social issues that integrates determinants (social responsibility, time orientation and issue involvement) and outcomes (assessment of negative consequences and feelings). Moreover, the results highlight that positive feelings are a significant outcome of prosocial behaviour.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Abstract

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1305-9

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Jomo Sankara, Dennis M. Patten and Deborah L. Lindberg

This paper investigates the market response to the poor quality of reporting on the first mandated set of conflict minerals disclosures in the US setting. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the market response to the poor quality of reporting on the first mandated set of conflict minerals disclosures in the US setting. The authors examine the reaction for both filing firms at their filing date and non-filing companies at the filing deadline.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use standard market model methods to capture investor response and test for differences across reactions using comparisons of means and regression models. The authors also code reports for a sub-sample of firms and test for the relation between disclosure and market reactions.

Findings

The authors document a significant negative reaction for both filing and non-filing firms, with the latter group suffering a more negative reaction than the filers. The authors also find more extensive disclosure is associated with less negative market reactions. Finally, the authors provide evidence supporting the argument that the more pronounced reaction for the non-filers is due to concerns with incremental implementation costs for these firms.

Research limitations/implications

The results extend prior research into investor perceptions of exposures to social and political costs. The findings suggest that investors view both poor quality disclosure and lack of response to mandated requirements as increasing such exposures.

Practical implications

The negative market response could be expected to exert additional pressures on companies to better assess and report on conflict mineral exposures in their supply chains.

Social implications

The findings suggest investors pay attention to the corporate response to mandated social disclosure requirements, an important finding as mandates for similar types of disclosure appear to be in the offing.

Originality/value

This study is the first to extend the social and political cost exposure literature to analysis of mandated social disclosures.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Deborah McPhee, Al-Karim Samnani and Francine Schlosser

Workplace injury and death of young persons are important concerns. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the mediating role of safety behaviours underpinning the…

Abstract

Purpose

Workplace injury and death of young persons are important concerns. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the mediating role of safety behaviours underpinning the relationship between perceived safety climate (PSC) and injuries, and the moderating roles of safety-specific transformational leadership (SSTL), general transformational leadership (GTL) and training in influencing the mediation, for young workers.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory, online questionnaire was completed by 367 university students employed in various industries. Data were analysed using moderated mediation.

Findings

Safety behaviours mediated the relationship between PSC and injuries. SSTL moderated the relationship between PSC and safety behaviours, but GTL did not. Training did not positively moderate the relationship between safety behaviour and injuries, yet may still inform us on the training by referent others since safety behaviour mediated the relationship between PSC and injuries when SSTL, GTL and training were high.

Research limitations/implications

A student sample was utilised, but was appropriate in this context as it is representative of the type of workers being studied. Longitudinal data with larger diverse data sets should be incorporated.

Practical implications

Business owners must utilise both forms of leadership to promote a safe workplace. HR and H&S professionals must continue to encourage this promotion.

Social implications

Safety training and leadership are important for policy makers and regulators to reduce workplace injuries for youth workers.

Originality/value

This study is the first to test youth H&S using moderated mediation. Safety specific and general forms of leadership and training are important predictors.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Matthew Martin, Megan A. Phillips, Mary Saxon, Kailey Love, Laurie Cessna, Deborah L. Woodard, Mary Page, Kenneth Curry, Alyssa Paone, Bobbie Pennington-Stallcup and William Riley

People living with opioid use disorder (OUD) disproportionately encounter the criminal justice system. Although incarcerated individuals with OUD face higher risk for…

Abstract

Purpose

People living with opioid use disorder (OUD) disproportionately encounter the criminal justice system. Although incarcerated individuals with OUD face higher risk for withdrawals, relapses and overdoses, most jails fail to offer comprehensive medications for OUD (MOUD), including recovery support services and transition of care to a community provider. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development and implementation of a comprehensive MOUD program at a large county jail system in Maricopa County, Arizona.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used the Sequential Intercept Model (SIM) to develop a community-based, multi-organizational program for incarcerated individuals with OUD. The SIM is a mapping process of the criminal justice system and was applied in Maricopa County, Arizona to identify gaps in services and strengthen resources at each key intercept. The program applies an integrated care framework that is person-centered and incorporates medical, behavioral and social services to improve population health.

Findings

Stakeholders worked collaboratively to develop a multi-point program for incarcerated individuals with OUD that includes an integrated care service with brief screening, MOUD and treatment; a residential treatment program; peer support; community provider referrals; and a court diversion program. Recovery support specialists provide education, support and care coordination between correctional and community health services.

Originality/value

OUD is a common problem in many correctional health centers. However, many jails do not provide a comprehensive approach to connect incarcerated individuals with OUD treatment. The Maricopa County, Arizona jail system opioid treatment program is unique because of the ongoing support from recovery support specialists during and after incarceration.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen, Francine Schlosser and Deborah Zinni

This study aims to employ a resource‐oriented theoretical perspective to examine retirees' desire to return to their former organization.

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1183

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to employ a resource‐oriented theoretical perspective to examine retirees' desire to return to their former organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross‐sectional field study design, data were collected from 243 retirees under 65 years of age who had been retired from a career job less than ten years.

Findings

Regression results indicate that retirees who had experienced financial and pervasive role loss as well as retirees who perceived a higher fit with their former organization and the availability of desired job role options expressed significantly greater interest in returning. Retirees who experienced gains in leaving work as well as gains in their life satisfaction following retirement reported significantly less interest in returning to their former organization.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional design and self‐report data create a potential for bias. Even though the findings are based on respondents' “interest” in returning to their former organization, it is not known if they actually did return.

Practical implications

Programs should focus on creating an environment that values older workers, and provides them with opportunities such as mentoring other workers.

Social implications

Policy changes are needed to ensure that returning to work following retirement results in resource gains and not resource losses.

Originality/value

This study uses resource theory with a diverse sample of retirees and considers their desire to return to their original employers, thus adding value to human resources and management who wish to retain or re‐engage their own knowledgeable retirees.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2019

Nisha Nair, Deborah Cain Good and Audrey J. Murrell

Given the nascent stage of research on microaggressions, the study is an attempt to better understand the experience of microaggressions and examine it from the point of…

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1295

Abstract

Purpose

Given the nascent stage of research on microaggressions, the study is an attempt to better understand the experience of microaggressions and examine it from the point of view of different marginalized minority identities. The purpose of this paper is to report on the subjective experience of microaggressions from the lenses of gender, race, religion and sexual orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore how microaggressions are experienced by different identities, the authors conducted four focus group studies with university students at a prominent Midwestern university. Each focus group focused on the experience of microaggressions for a particular identity group.

Findings

The authors discuss the nature and forms of exclusion that occur through microaggressions, and offer six microaggression themes that emerged as common across the marginalized identities studied. The authors add to the microaggression taxonomy and highlight the role of repetition in how microaggressions are perceived. The authors also discuss intersectional microaggressions.

Originality/value

While various studies have focused on reporting microaggression themes with regard to singular identities, this study is potentially the first that explores microaggression themes across different marginalized identities. The findings highlight novel forms of microaggressions such as the revealing or making visible of marginalized identities, and microaggressions emanating from within a minority group directed at other members within the same identity group, what the authors call as in-group microaggressions. The authors highlight and point to the need for more work on intersectional microaggressions.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Janet L. Sims‐Wood

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the…

Abstract

Life studies are a rich source for further research on the role of the Afro‐American woman in society. They are especially useful to gain a better understanding of the Afro‐American experience and to show the joys, sorrows, needs, and ideals of the Afro‐American woman as she struggles from day to day.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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