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Abstract

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International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article

Adam Fletcher, Natasha Fitzgerald-Yau, Meg Wiggins, Russell M. Viner and Chris Bonell

The purpose of this paper is to explore the process of involving students and staff on school action groups, and staff and student experiences of reviewing local data and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the process of involving students and staff on school action groups, and staff and student experiences of reviewing local data and initiating school-level changes, to address bullying and other aggression.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on qualitative, process data collected at four purposively sampled pilot intervention schools in England via semi-structured interviews with school managers, action group members and facilitators (n=33), focus groups with students (n=16) and staff (n=4), and observations.

Findings

School staff used multiple methods to recruit a diverse range of students onto school action groups. Locally tailored data reports were an important catalyst for action groups to identify priorities and plan whole school change – both through the process of “validation” (whereby existing concerns were confirmed) and “discovery” (whereby new problems were identified). An unexpected benefit of providing schools with these data was that it triggered analyses of other data sources, including routine monitoring data. External facilitators were important in promoting student voice and ensuring the intervention retained integrity as a whole-school restorative approach.

Practical implications

It was feasible to involve young people using action groups, and there was evidence of school-level actions led by students, including in disadvantaged school contexts. Future Health Promoting Schools interventions could incorporate this approach to support locally appropriate, school-level change.

Originality/value

The micro-level processes that were observed, whereby action groups interrogated feedback reports and collected additional data, suggest the responsiveness of such youth-involvement interventions to local needs. Contrary to many public health interventions, implementation appeared to be facilitated rather than hindered by features of the secondary-school “market” whereby parents have some choice between schools.

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Article

John R. Ogilvie and Deborah L. Kidder

The purpose of this paper is to review research on styles of negotiating and distinguish them from conflict styles and individual difference measures studied in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review research on styles of negotiating and distinguish them from conflict styles and individual difference measures studied in negotiation contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature on negotiating styles is reviewed, a model is presented that synthesizes previous research, and suggestions for future research are presented.

Findings

Previous research has predominantly considered leadership styles in terms of the five conflict‐handling styles (collaborating, competing, compromising, accommodating, and avoiding) from the Dual Concerns Model. While this focus has been useful, the paper also points out that other measures exist that may be more useful for understanding negotiating styles, although they have yet to be validated.

Originality/value

Negotiating styles, as distinct patterns of behavior, are critical for understanding effective negotiations as well as being able to train students in negotiation skills.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Deborah Cartmill

Discusses the issue of charging for public library services.Implementing a charge for services is viewed against a background ofincreasing demand for services and falling…

Abstract

Discusses the issue of charging for public library services. Implementing a charge for services is viewed against a background of increasing demand for services and falling budgets. Puts forward arguments both for and against charging for services, and discusses the effect which new technology is having on services, and the debate about charging. Also discusses alternative methods for the library service to raise additional income. Concludes that charging for services is not the only option open to the library to raise money.

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Library Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Abstract

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The Next Phase of Business Ethics: Integrating Psychology and Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-809-5

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Article

Paul Jesilow, Jon’a Meyer, Deborah Parsons and William Tegeler

Problem‐oriented policing has been widely implemented during recent years, but researchers have conducted few controlled evaluations to assess its effectiveness. This…

Abstract

Problem‐oriented policing has been widely implemented during recent years, but researchers have conducted few controlled evaluations to assess its effectiveness. This paper presents a quasi‐experiment designed to test the effects of one such programme. Interviews with Santa Ana residents before and after the introduction of problem‐oriented policing in the city’s developmental district suggest that the archetype can lessen citizens’ complaints about their neighbourhoods.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article

Deborah L. Kidder

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of restorative justice as a tool for rebuilding trust and repairing damaged relationships in the workplace.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of restorative justice as a tool for rebuilding trust and repairing damaged relationships in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature on restorative justice, found predominantly in the criminology field, is reviewed, and the origins and tenets of restorative justice are explained.

Findings

Research suggests that the goals of restorative justice are to repair the harm after a damaging incident, to repair the damaged relationship between the two parties in conflict, and restore the offender back to the community.

Originality/value

Restorative justice promises to address the issue of repairing damaged relationships at work, a critical problem in organizations that has yet to be thoroughly addressed in the management literature.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Diane K. Kovacs

The impact of electronic publishing (e‐publishing) on library collections, services and administration is complex. There are no simple solutions to the problems of…

Abstract

The impact of electronic publishing (e‐publishing) on library collections, services and administration is complex. There are no simple solutions to the problems of managing the collection, archiving and access to e‐publications as well as including them in library services. There are, however, many good usable solutions that libraries can learn from each other. No one needs to recreate the wheel to cope with e‐publications. Many librarians feel that the technology to solve the problems and take advantage of e‐publishing is either currently available or clearly under development. How the advent and increasing presence of e‐publications will impact the people who will read them may ultimately be of more importance than what we will do with the machines, the storage media or the delivery mechanism. Therefore, emphasis in this special theme issue is more on the human‐interaction aspects of e‐publishing rather than on the technology or delivery mechanisms.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Abstract

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The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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