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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Nisha Nair, Deborah Cain Good and Audrey J. Murrell

Given the nascent stage of research on microaggressions, the study is an attempt to better understand the experience of microaggressions and examine it from the point of…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the nascent stage of research on microaggressions, the study is an attempt to better understand the experience of microaggressions and examine it from the point of view of different marginalized minority identities. The purpose of this paper is to report on the subjective experience of microaggressions from the lenses of gender, race, religion and sexual orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore how microaggressions are experienced by different identities, the authors conducted four focus group studies with university students at a prominent Midwestern university. Each focus group focused on the experience of microaggressions for a particular identity group.

Findings

The authors discuss the nature and forms of exclusion that occur through microaggressions, and offer six microaggression themes that emerged as common across the marginalized identities studied. The authors add to the microaggression taxonomy and highlight the role of repetition in how microaggressions are perceived. The authors also discuss intersectional microaggressions.

Originality/value

While various studies have focused on reporting microaggression themes with regard to singular identities, this study is potentially the first that explores microaggression themes across different marginalized identities. The findings highlight novel forms of microaggressions such as the revealing or making visible of marginalized identities, and microaggressions emanating from within a minority group directed at other members within the same identity group, what the authors call as in-group microaggressions. The authors highlight and point to the need for more work on intersectional microaggressions.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Julie Z. Sneath, Carol M. Megehee and Deborah F. Spake

The purpose of this paper is to examine the subculture of Southern Mardi Gras society in coastal Mississippi and Alabama.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the subculture of Southern Mardi Gras society in coastal Mississippi and Alabama.

Design/methodology/approach

Participant observation was used to explore the subculture as well as depth interviews with 42 informants who participated in Mardi Gras societies and/or balls.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that social identity theory is supported in Southern Mardi Gras society and that elements of racial divide, social stratification, and fixity of residence continue to support this subculture.

Originality/value

While most who are aware of Mardi Gras traditions associate it solely with New Orleans, this paper presents the rich subculture of Mardi Gras societies that extends along the upper Gulf Coast region of the USA. Tied to tourism in this region, these practices are explored for the nuances of this subculture and the Mardi Gras event myth.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2019

M. Neus Álvarez, M. Laura Angelini, Inmaculada López-Lull and Chiara Tasso

This chapter examines how lesson study is reported with pre-service teachers in initial teacher education programmes. Different voices are included talking about the ways…

Abstract

This chapter examines how lesson study is reported with pre-service teachers in initial teacher education programmes. Different voices are included talking about the ways in which lesson study has been reported in various settings so far. The chapter concludes with a qualitative study of student-teachers’ reflections drawn from their reports, written after finalising the lesson study cycle at the Universidad Católica de Valencia. The analysis provides support for the premise that lesson study significantly promotes research in ITE and develops a more critical approach to literature about pedagogy and good practice in teaching.

Details

Lesson Study in Initial Teacher Education: Principles and Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-797-9

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Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2005

Deborah S. Wilson

Beginning in narrative re-evaluated daily from classrooms inside prison walls, this article further explores cultural, ethical, and social values of teaching college…

Abstract

Beginning in narrative re-evaluated daily from classrooms inside prison walls, this article further explores cultural, ethical, and social values of teaching college courses inside the wall. Interrogating public discourse over what Eric Schlosser terms the “prison–industrial complex” arrogates subsequent considerations. Prison-building became a growth industry, even as prevailing political response to prisoners themselves became increasingly censorious and unforgiving. Traditional American culture preaches redemption but relishes abasement, promises forgiveness but refuses forgetting. Carefully examining further questions about humanistic discourse as a possible locus for radicalization, we finally confront how the prisoners’ situation reflects rather than deflects traditional expectations.

Details

Crime and Punishment: Perspectives from the Humanities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-245-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1933

THE recruitment, training and payment of librarians are matters of import, not only to the youngest entrant into this work, but also to established librarians and to the…

Abstract

THE recruitment, training and payment of librarians are matters of import, not only to the youngest entrant into this work, but also to established librarians and to the public. Although training was initiated forty years ago by the then chief librarians of libraries, it has in recent years become a very intimate concern of library assistants and of parents and others in charge of young folk who are considering librarianship as their possible career. After thirty years of experiment, with minor changes, the Library Association syllabus has now been completely remodelled. We have also reached a stage when we can consider to some extent, although not adequately, the effect upon the profession of our whole‐time library school of university rank. The various phases of the work must therefore be of great interest to every reader of The Library World; and this is sufficient justification for the special attention which the subject receives in this number. The first question must always be the economic and human one. Is the profession sufficiently large, and of enough importance, to justify parents in allowing lads or girls, who have gone through a secondary or even university training, to devote themselves to the somewhat protracted study which is prescribed for the work? Then, again, is the training now placed before the would‐be aspirant to library work a wise training? Is it too special, too technical, too scholarly; indeed, is the library authority, whoever and wherever it may be, asking too much for what most people regard as the very simple work of managing and distributing and exploiting books?

Details

New Library World, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Abstract

Details

Assistive Technology to Support Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-520-7

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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Carolyn S. Hunt and Deborah MacPhee

This article presents a case study of Kelly, a third-grade teacher enrolled in a literacy leadership course within a Master of Reading program. In this course, practicing…

Abstract

Purpose

This article presents a case study of Kelly, a third-grade teacher enrolled in a literacy leadership course within a Master of Reading program. In this course, practicing teachers completed an assignment in which they implemented a literacy coaching cycle with a colleague, video-recorded their interaction, and conducted critical discourse analysis (CDA) of the interaction. The authors explore how engaging in CDA influenced Kelly's enactment of professional identities as she prepared to be a literacy leader.

Design/methodology/approach

Data presented in this article are taken from a larger study of four white, middle-class teachers enrolled in the course. Data sources included the students' final paper and semistructured interviews. The researchers used qualitative coding methods to analyze all data sources, identify prominent themes, and select Kelly as a focal participant for further analysis.

Findings

Findings indicate that Kelly's confidence as a literacy leader grew after participating in the coaching cycle and conducting CDA. Through CDA, Kelly explored how prominent discourses of teaching and learning, particularly those relating to novice and expert status, influenced Kelly in-the-moment coaching interactions.

Originality/value

Previous literacy coaching research suggests that literacy coaches need professional learning opportunities that support a deep understanding of coaching stances and discursive moves to effectively support teachers. The current study suggests that CDA may be one promising method for engaging literacy coaches in such work because it allows coaches to gain understandings about how discourses of teaching and learning function within coaching interactions.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Susan C. Cooper and Susan E. Hillyard

The winter 1987 issue of Reference Services Review featured a bibliography of AIDS‐related materials prepared by Edmund SantaVicca, former head of Collection Management…

Abstract

The winter 1987 issue of Reference Services Review featured a bibliography of AIDS‐related materials prepared by Edmund SantaVicca, former head of Collection Management Services at Cleveland State University.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Mark Winston

The purpose of this paper is to address the profession's focus on diversity, including the original research, and analyze the research beyond the profession to understand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the profession's focus on diversity, including the original research, and analyze the research beyond the profession to understand better the bases for the limited progress in fulfilling diversity goals. The paper focuses on the fact that diversity has been equated with race and the potential implications of that relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

An overview and analysis of diversity research, including factors associated with the success of diversity programs, is presented, focusing on research regarding the relationship between diversity and race. The article also considers how perceptions of race and racism have been manifested across sectors and in various countries. Based upon the fact that diversity and race have been equated, the discussion focuses on the extent to which this relationship is connected to the limited progress associated with diversity goals.

Findings

Research related to race, diversity, and affirmative action indicate both the complexity of the concepts among scientists, social scientists, and members of the general public, as well as the biases reflected in the viewpoints, often manifested in public policy. The research among communication scholars also indicates a predisposition to avoiding communication about difficult topics, such as race and racism, reflective in the use of more benign terminology, such as diversity.

Practical implications

While diversity research continues to be necessary in the profession, going beyond that which documents the levels of under‐representation, there is also the need for further consideration of the applicability of research beyond the LIS profession. In this regard, the understanding of research related to diversity, race, and affirmative action, and the relationship among the three provides the basis for further research in LIS and a more informed approach in addressing diversity issues in the profession.

Originality/value

The primary focus of the discussion of the paper is that of the nature of diversity, race and racism, as defined in the context of the USA. However, research related to race, racial classifications and hierarchies, and diversity in other parts of North America, Australia, Europe, and Africa are considered to a limited extent as well.

Details

New Library World, vol. 109 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Gregori Galofré-Vilà

In this chapter, network analysis has been used to map out disciplinary areas of research and authorship in economic history. A total of 5,330 peer-reviewed articles…

Abstract

In this chapter, network analysis has been used to map out disciplinary areas of research and authorship in economic history. A total of 5,330 peer-reviewed articles published in the leading economic history journals has been surveyed. Since 1980, the number of publications has risen and then rapidly accelerated over the last 2 decades. This rise has been fueled by research being conducted within European universities instead of US or UK ones.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-179-7

Keywords

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