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1 – 10 of 32
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2018

Deborah A. O’Neil, Margaret E. Brooks and Margaret M. Hopkins

The purpose of this paper is to better understand women’s working relationships and career support behaviors, by investigating expectations women have of other women regarding…

1456

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand women’s working relationships and career support behaviors, by investigating expectations women have of other women regarding senior women’s roles in (and motivations for) helping junior women succeed, and junior women’s engagement in their own career advancement behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed self- and other-reports of senior women’s engagement in career assistance behaviors on behalf of junior women colleagues, and junior women’s engagement in their own career advancement behaviors. One sample of respondents indicated to what extent they believed senior women did engage in career assistance toward junior women, and to what extent they believed junior women did engage in career advancement. Another sample indicated to what extent they believed senior women should engage in career assistance, and to what extent they believed junior women should engage in their own career advancement.

Findings

Results suggest a disconnect between the expectations and perceptions junior and senior women have of each other. Junior women expect senior women to engage in career assistance behaviors to a greater degree than they believe senior women are engaging in such behaviors, and junior women think they are doing more to advance their careers than senior women are expecting them to do. The authors examine individual and organizational implications of these unmet expectations and perception mismatches.

Originality/value

Women-to-women working relationships are under-studied, and typically viewed in either/or terms – good or bad. The findings provide a more nuanced understanding of women’s perceptions and expectations and offer suggestions for how women can influence female career advancement.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2011

Deborah A. O'Neil, Margaret M. Hopkins and Sherry E. Sullivan

The use of women's networks is emerging as one method of advancing women's careers within organizations. However, the value of these networks has been questioned. The purpose of…

4918

Abstract

Purpose

The use of women's networks is emerging as one method of advancing women's careers within organizations. However, the value of these networks has been questioned. The purpose of this study is to examine how potential differences in the perceptions of network members and the firm's executive leadership about the purposes and anticipated outcomes of a women's network may impact women's career advancement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed 21 members of an intra‐firm women's network and six members of the executive leadership team of a global organization. To examine the qualitative data, they used a process of thematic analysis to discover prevalent themes in the transcribed interviews.

Findings

Both members of the women's network and the executive leadership team placed responsibility for women's career advancement upon the individual; the firm's male‐dominated culture and organizational constraints were not emphasized. While members of the women's network recognized how the network could be used to contribute to the firm's strategic goals, the executive leadership team did not recognize the network's possible effect on the firm's bottom line.

Originality/value

Examines how potential differences in the perceptions of network members and the firm's executive leadership about the purposes and anticipated outcomes of a women's network may impact women's career advancement.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2011

Margaret M. Hopkins, Deborah A. O'Neil, Kathleen FitzSimons, Philip L. Bailin and James K. Stoller

Leaders in health care today are faced with a wide array of complex issues. This chapter describes an innovative physician leadership development program at the Cleveland Clinic…

Abstract

Leaders in health care today are faced with a wide array of complex issues. This chapter describes an innovative physician leadership development program at the Cleveland Clinic intended to enhance the leadership capacities of individuals and the organization. Propositions regarding the program's impact on organizational innovation, organizational commitment, social capital, and the human element of physician practice are offered for future examination.

Details

Organization Development in Healthcare: Conversations on Research and Strategies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-709-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Deborah A. O'Neil and Diana Bilimoria

This study aims to explore the nature of women's career experiences over the life course by examining career patterns, career locus, career contexts, and career beliefs.

11632

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the nature of women's career experiences over the life course by examining career patterns, career locus, career contexts, and career beliefs.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, inductive approach to data gathering and analysis was employed, using life story surveys, semi‐structured interviewing, thematic analysis, grounded theory, code development and descriptive statistics.

Findings

The data revealed distinct patterns of how women's careers develop over time, particularly with regard to the impact of career contexts (societal, organizational, and relational) and women's own changing images of their careers and career success. A three‐phase, age‐linked model of women's career development is proposed: the idealistic achievement phase; the pragmatic endurance phase; and the reinventive contribution phase.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should test replicability of these findings to determine whether this three‐phase model is embedded in the particular socio‐historical context of the times in which the particular women in this sample have lived or is universally applicable across different eras and changing realities.

Practical implications

Better organizational efforts are needed to ensure that women receive ongoing coaching and mentoring, work for managers who support their development, have access to organizational resources and opportunities to develop their skills, are given challenging assignments, are acknowledged for their unique talents, and are recognized for aptitude learned through life experiences and “non‐traditional” work histories.

Originality/value

This is a rare, women‐only study that looks at the career dynamics of women over the life course.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Maureen Casile, Kristine F. Hoover and Deborah A. O'Neil

The purpose of this paper is to expand the understanding of outcomes of service‐learning/community engagement. The current study explored the efficacy of service‐learning as a

1004

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand the understanding of outcomes of service‐learning/community engagement. The current study explored the efficacy of service‐learning as a pedagogical tool to support content mastery by undergraduates in a management class.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved a classroom experiment with 120 students randomly assigned to complete a service‐learning or a research project as a class requirement. Data regarding mastery of course content was collected through a multiple‐choice assessment at the end of the course, and analyzed using statistical methods.

Findings

Results showed that service‐learning can be a better mechanism for student mastery of course concepts than a traditional research project. However, the benefits of service‐learning appeared to accrue disproportionately to women.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest that educators should incorporate service‐learning into their classrooms to enhance content mastery, and that future research should examine the specific elements of service‐learning that contribute to both female and male students' learning. The findings are limited to traditional undergraduate students in a face‐to‐face management course.

Originality/value

This research study directly addresses some of the tensions between service‐learning/student‐community engagement and traditional university education. Service‐learning has been shown to support student development of socially valuable outcomes. Inclusion of service‐learning in college curricula can be particularly challenging, when a desire for ethical development must be balanced with course content mastery. According to the findings of the current study, service‐learning produces both service to the community and service to the students, as an effective pedagogical tool for content mastery.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Margaret M. Hopkins, Deborah A. O'Neil and Helen W. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence and effective board governance.

5356

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence and effective board governance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied a model of emotional intelligence competencies to the practice domains of school boards. A board self‐assessment questionnaire measured board practice domains for the presence or absence of 18 emotional intelligence competencies defined in an emotional competence inventory. Inter‐rater reliabilities were established and confirmed. Current and former school board members in two urban areas rank‐ordered the most critical emotional intelligence competencies for effective board governance and offered explanations for their most highly‐rated competencies.

Findings

Emotional intelligence is a critical factor for effective school boards. A set of six core competencies are universal across the six board practice domains: transparency; achievement; initiative; organizational awareness; conflict management; and teamwork and collaboration. Each board practice domain is also characterized by one or two key emotional intelligence competencies.

Research limitations/implications

First, one model of school board leadership was used. Future studies should examine additional models of effective board practice for their relationships with emotional intelligence in order to extend the generalizability of these results. Second, there has been some debate regarding the substantive nature of the emotional intelligence construct.

Practical implications

The six practice domains in the school board effectiveness model are fundamental elements for all boards to develop in order to become more effective governing bodies.

Originality/value

This paper identifies a novel application of emotional intelligence leadership competencies to the work of effective governance boards.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Deborah A. O'Neil, Diana Bilimoria and Argun Saatcioglu

This study, examines women's career types and their effects on women's satisfaction with their career success and their attributions of the sources of this career success. The…

7285

Abstract

This study, examines women's career types and their effects on women's satisfaction with their career success and their attributions of the sources of this career success. The study proposes a typology of four career types that are determined by the manifestation of a woman's career pattern and career locus. It finds empirical evidence of three distinct career types for women: achievers, navigators and accommodators. Women having accommodator career types are significantly less satisfied with their career success than women having navigator career types and achiever career types.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Margaret M. Hopkins, Deborah A. O'Neil and James K Stoller

The purpose of this paper is to determine the particular competencies demonstrated by effective physician leaders. Changing organizational and environmental dynamics present…

1492

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the particular competencies demonstrated by effective physician leaders. Changing organizational and environmental dynamics present unique challenges to leaders in the field of healthcare. An accelerated emphasis on increasing the quality of health care delivery, containing costs, and restructuring the delivery of health care itself are redefining the very nature of healthcare and the roles of physicians as leaders. Given this context, the authors propose to identify the essential competencies for twenty-first century physician leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 53 critical incident interviews from 28 physicians identified as emerging leaders at the Cleveland Clinic, a top-rated US academic healthcare institution, were examined in two ways: an existing leadership competency model was applied to each critical incident and inductively derived themes were identified through thematic analysis of the incidents.

Findings

The predominant distinguishing leadership competencies demonstrated by the physician leaders included: Empathy, Initiative, Emotional Self-Awareness and Organizational Awareness. Communicating deliberately, getting buy-in from colleagues, focussing on the mission of the organization and showing respect for others were also discovered through thematic analysis to be essential practices of these effective physician leaders. Over 90 percent of the critical incident stories dealt with colleague-to-colleague interactions.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted in one academic healthcare organization, thus limiting the generalizability of the results. Additional research testing these results in a variety of healthcare institutions is warranted.

Originality/value

This study identified specific competencies that distinguish effective physician leaders. These leaders actively sought to work with colleagues to obtain their input and consensus in order to enact organizational change and improve health care delivery in their institution. Importantly, their intentions were neither self-focussed nor self-promoting but strongly mission driven. The identification of physician leader competencies will assist incumbent and emerging physician leaders in their ability to be effective leaders, as well as inform the design of training and development programs for physicians.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Margaret M. Hopkins, Deborah A. O’Neil and Diana Bilimoria

This exploratory study describes the images of effective leadership and successful organizational advancement held by women in numerous positions in the health care fields.

3065

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study describes the images of effective leadership and successful organizational advancement held by women in numerous positions in the health care fields.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys of 140 women in the health care field were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed.

Findings

Differences were found between the characteristics of effective leadership and the characteristics contributing to successful advancement. Women in health care predominantly portray effective leadership in other‐oriented (team or organizationally focused) and stereotypically feminine or gender‐neutral terms. In contrast, successful advancement in organizations was predominantly and almost exclusively described in self‐focused and stereotypically masculine terms. Similarities and differences in the perspectives on leadership effectiveness, career advancement, satisfaction, and development strategies were examined among physicians, nurses, administrators, faculty, and others (scientists and researchers).

Research limitations/implications

Implications of the disparate perspectives held by women in health care are discussed and future directions for research are proposed.

Originality/value

Since women overwhelmingly dominate employment in the health care field, to explicate their unique perspectives of leadership and career advancement.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Yehuda Baruch

470

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

1 – 10 of 32