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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2023

Debbie Tolson, Louise Ritchie, Michael Smith, Margaret Mullen Brown and Steven Tolson

This paper aims to examine housing need for older people and people with dementia, with reference to Scotland. This paper also examines policy responses and tensions arising from…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine housing need for older people and people with dementia, with reference to Scotland. This paper also examines policy responses and tensions arising from such need and looks critically at the evidence of care needs and what older people want in relation to later life conditions, including dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

Taking the Being Home: Housing and Dementia in Scotland report (2017) as a baseline descriptor, the authors have collated evidence from a range of sources to help them examine what has changed in terms of policy, practice and population ageing. Set against this backdrop, using desk-based analytical methods, the authors interrogate existing planning processes and systems in Scotland.

Findings

Scottish Spatial Planning has a policy blindness on the overwhelming evidence of the housing needs derived from an ageing population. Policy focus is geared towards the amount of housing supplied, rather than appropriate types of housing, leaving older people with little choice of suitable accommodation. A key area to improve is in establishing greater co-operation and policy synthesis between health, social, housing and planning functions. Broad policy ambition must be transferred into detailed reality for older people and people with dementia to benefit.

Originality/value

The integrated approach and in-depth analysis, linked to planning policy and housing need, is highly original and much needed.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Bryan Mitchell, Graham A. Jackson, Barbara Sharp and Debbie Tolson

This paper reports on an action research study that aimed to collaboratively develop a complementary therapy care intervention to augment palliative care choices available to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports on an action research study that aimed to collaboratively develop a complementary therapy care intervention to augment palliative care choices available to nursing home residents with advanced dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

An action research design was adopted that consisted of a series of action cycles involving collaborative exploration, problem-solving planning, development and evidence gathering. A combination of mixed methods was used when gaining data at the different stages, including face to face delivered questionnaires, observational notes, focus groups, and the objective measure of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory adapted for Nursing Homes (NPI-NH).

Findings

Care home staff and relatives considered the use of Complementary Therapy to be a helpful intervention promoting that it can reduce a sense of loneliness and provide companionship for residents experiencing distress. Analysis of NPI-NH scores showed a reduction in presenting neuropsychiatric behaviours associated with stress and distress.

Research limitations/implications

Differing levels of participant group engagement may affect this study’s findings as it was noted that care home staff provided a fuller contribution to the project in comparison to relatives.

Practical implications

Implementation guidance is needed when implementing complementary therapy within the nursing home practice to promote consistency and successful integration of an intervention that is not provided as routine care.

Originality/value

The findings of this study are encouraging and demonstrate the acceptability of complementary therapies to residents with advanced dementia, where positive impacts on otherwise difficult to address dementia symptoms related to stress and distress are highlighted.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Louise Ritchie, Anna Jack-Waugh, Elsa Sanatombi Devi, Binil V, Anice George, Joyce Henry, Clarita Shynal Martis, Debjani Gangopadhyay and Debbie Tolson

Many individual and family hardships are associated with poorly understood palliative care needs arising from advanced dementia within India. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Many individual and family hardships are associated with poorly understood palliative care needs arising from advanced dementia within India. The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of people in India affected by advanced dementia and to shape educational approaches for practitioners and the local community.

Design/methodology/approach

Three focus groups with family carers of people (n = 27) with advanced dementia were undertaken with local communities in South India. One focus group was carried out in English and two in the local language (Kannada) and translated to English.

Findings

The findings of the focus groups are presented in four themes, conditions of caring, intersecting vulnerabilities, desperate acts of care and awareness of education and training needs. These themes highlight the challenges faced by family carers of people with advanced dementia and describe the potential harm, abuse and poor mental well-being facing both the person with dementia and the family carer as a result of their situation.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to explore ways to ensure inclusivity and sensitivity in the research process and enable equal participation from all participants.

Practical implications

The findings highlight a lack of support for family carers of people with advanced dementia and demonstrate the need for dementia-specific integrated and palliative care approaches in India.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into the experiences and challenges facing family caregivers of people living with advanced dementia in India to shape practitioner education in a way that will underpin effective dementia-specific palliation and integrated services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Anne Hendry, Debbie Tolson, Áine Carroll and Anne Mills

235

Abstract

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Louise Ritchie, Pauline Banks, Michael Danson, Debbie Tolson and Fiona Borrowman

Recent changes affecting state pension age, and earlier diagnosis, will result in more people with dementia in employment. The purpose of this paper is to establish the nature of…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent changes affecting state pension age, and earlier diagnosis, will result in more people with dementia in employment. The purpose of this paper is to establish the nature of support that would enable/enables people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment to continue employment post diagnosis.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative review was carried out supported by information derived from a thematic analysis of data from interviews with seven relatives supporting a younger person with dementia and one person with dementia.

Findings

Six papers were identified for inclusion in the review. Findings from the published papers and interviews indicated that work is a significant issue for people with dementia highlighting problems with job retention, work performance and the impact of diagnosis.

Research limitations/implications

The review highlighted a dearth of high-quality research in the area. Although employment was not the main focus of the interviews, the extracts highlight some of the challenges that face people who develop dementia while of working age, their families, and employers.

Practical implications

Vocational rehabilitation is primarily carried out by allied health professionals; however, there is a lack of research evidence relating to people with dementia in the workplace. Further research is needed in order to inform future practice.

Social implications

Loss of employment deprives families of financial security and employers of a skilled employee.

Originality/value

This is the first review to focus on dementia in employment, providing a starting point on which to base future research in this area.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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