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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2013

Robert J. Blomme, Jenny Sok, Arjan van Rheede and Debbie M. Tromp

The relationship between work and family has long been the subject of lively debate in the political, public, and academic arena. Employers in the hospitality industry…

Abstract

The relationship between work and family has long been the subject of lively debate in the political, public, and academic arena. Employers in the hospitality industry should carefully consider the work–family balance of their employees because maintaining a good balance will result in lower costs, lower sick rates, and lower staff turnover. The term “balance” refers to the way in which work interferes with life at home and how home life interferes with work. It includes both the positive and negative effects that work has on the family domain and vice versa. As research on the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship is scarce with regard to work–family interference, it became the subject of this study. The results demonstrate that psychological contract measures, in particular time commitment, can explain work–family conflict, while job content can explain work–family enrichment. In addition, the study revealed that with the appearance of gender as a moderator, different additional factors may play a role in work–family enrichment and work–family conflict. Furthermore, it revealed that family structure is not a predictor for work–family interference. This paper discusses managerial implications and offers recommendations for further research.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2011

Jenny M.H. Sok, Rob J. Blomme, Debbie M. Tromp and Jaap J. Van Muijen

The purpose of this research project was to identify success factors in the careers of top women in the hospitality industry. We started out by interviewing five women who…

Abstract

The purpose of this research project was to identify success factors in the careers of top women in the hospitality industry. We started out by interviewing five women who are currently working in a high management position in the hospitality industry, about their experiences on their way to the top. For the purpose of comparison we later on decided to apply theoretical sampling and include women from other industries, and subsequently men from inside and outside the hospitality industry. Grounded Theory analysis revealed six factors that influenced all their rising careers: internal drive, ambition, social skills, competencies, personality, and external factors. Although the factors were of varying importance at different stages of their professional life cycle, “internal drive” and “ambition” were found to be most important throughout the progressing careers. Some differences between the groups studied are described and implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-769-8

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2010

Debbie M. Tromp, Arjan van Rheede and Robert J. Blomme

Turnover of highly educated employees in the hospitality industry is growing rapidly. A predictor of turnover in the hospitality industry recently put forward, but not yet…

Abstract

Turnover of highly educated employees in the hospitality industry is growing rapidly. A predictor of turnover in the hospitality industry recently put forward, but not yet fully researched, is psychological strain. This chapter investigates the role of psychological strain and organizational support in relation to affective commitment and turnover intentions. The results show that both psychological strain and organizational support were found to be significant predictors of turnover intentions. The effect of organizational support was partly mediated by psychological strain and fully by affective commitment. No significant interaction effects with gender were found. As organizational support is a precursor of both psychological strain and intention to leave and is in the scope of influence of a hospitality company, it could be a starting point for reducing turnover.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-718-9

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Book part
Publication date: 27 May 2008

Robert J. Blomme, Debbie M. Tromp and Arjan van Rheede

As management-level turnover is increasing rapidly, one of the major challenges for the hospitality industry is to retain highly educated and highly skilled employees. As…

Abstract

As management-level turnover is increasing rapidly, one of the major challenges for the hospitality industry is to retain highly educated and highly skilled employees. As the psychological contract approach to the employment relationship had not been investigated with regard to the hospitality industry, it became the subject of this study. The results demonstrate that psychological contract measures, in particular job content, can explain why there is a substantial amount of variance in intention among highly educated hotel employees with regard to leaving the organization, especially when the mediating role of affective commitment is taken into account. In this paper, managerial implications are discussed, and recommendations for further research are made.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1489-8

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2011

Abstract

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-769-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2010

Abstract

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-718-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2013

Abstract

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-746-7

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Book part
Publication date: 27 May 2008

Abstract

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1489-8

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2018

Jenny Sok, Robert Jan Blomme, Melanie De Ruiter, Debbie Tromp and X.D. Lub

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between home-to-work spillover, measured as positive and negative home–work interference (HWI) and turnover intentions, as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between home-to-work spillover, measured as positive and negative home–work interference (HWI) and turnover intentions, as well as the mediating role of perceptions concerning training and development practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected among 418 respondents who were working at two business schools. A confirmative structural equation modeling analysis was conducted for the analysis.

Findings

As expected, positive HWI showed negative relationships with turnover intentions, while negative HWI related positively to turnover intentions. Training and development practices mediated the relationship between positive HWI and turnover intentions; the mediation effect was stronger for women than it was for men. Training and development practices did not mediate the relationship between negative HWI and turnover intentions, however.

Practical implications

The outcomes suggest that helping employees to balance their work and home lives can be beneficial for employees, as well as for employers in terms of reducing turnover intentions.

Originality/value

As contributions, additional insight into the relationship between positive and negative non-work factors and turnover intentions by examining the ways in which both positive as well as negative HWI are related to turnover intentions. Furthermore, the research considers the mediating role played by perceptions concerning human resource (HR) practices, and particularly training and development practices as perceived by the employee, in the relationship between positive and negative HWI and turnover intentions.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Debbie Marianne Tromp and Robert Jan Blomme

– The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact of leadership styles on negative work-home interference among highly educated employees in the hospitality industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the impact of leadership styles on negative work-home interference among highly educated employees in the hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among a sample of 126 highly educated hospitality employees working in various different companies. Hierarchical regression analyses were carried out to examine the effects of leadership styles, work-home arrangements and overtime on perceived negative work-home interference.

Findings

Autocratic leadership style, working overtime and a lack of work-home arrangements contributed significantly to negative work-home interference.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted with a limited sample in a relatively limited part of the sector. Further research is needed in other layers of hospitality organisations.

Practical implications

The findings provide insight into the impact of leadership on negative work-home interference. A variety of studies have identified negative work-home interference as an important precursor for employee turnover, and this study helps managers in developing beneficial management styles as well as HR policies to address negative work-home interference and its subsequent organisational effects.

Originality/value

What is new in this paper is the measurement of leadership style in relation to negative work-home interference in the hospitality industry. In addition, next to charismatic and transactional leadership styles, autocratic leadership style is taken into account.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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