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Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Debbie Haski-Leventhal

166

Abstract

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Abstract

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2021

Debbie Haski-Leventhal

489

Abstract

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2022

Debbie Haski-Leventhal

408

Abstract

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Megan Paull, Maryam Omari, Judith MacCallum, Susan Young, Gabrielle Walker, Kirsten Holmes, Debbie Haski-Leventhal and Rowena Scott

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of expectation formation and matching for university student volunteers and their hosts.

1579

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of expectation formation and matching for university student volunteers and their hosts.

Design/methodology/approach

This research involved a multi-stage data collection process including interviews with student volunteers, and university and host representatives from six Australian universities. The project team undertook an iterative process of coding and interpretation to identify themes and develop understanding of the phenomenon.

Findings

University student volunteering has the potential to fail to meet the expectations of at least one of the parties to the relationship when the expectations of the parties are not clearly articulated. Universities operating volunteer programmes have an important role in facilitating expectation formation and matching, minimising the chances of mismatched expectations.

Research limitations/implications

The study confirms the operation of a psychological contract for university student volunteers and organisations who host them which is consistent with other research in volunteering demonstrating the importance of matching expectations.

Practical implications

The paper identifies the importance of expectation formation and matching for hosts and students, and highlights the role of universities in facilitating matchmaking.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the growing body of research on the role of the psychological contract in volunteering, in particular in university student volunteering and host organisations.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 59 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 January 2022

Debbie Haski-Leventhal

186

Abstract

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Shafiqur Rahman, Debbie Haski-Leventhal and Mehrdokht Pournader

This paper aims to investigate the relations between employee corporate social responsibility (CSR) attitudes on job satisfaction (JS) and organizational commitment (OC…

2136

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relations between employee corporate social responsibility (CSR) attitudes on job satisfaction (JS) and organizational commitment (OC) in the context of Bangladeshi banks in the developing world. Specifically, it examines the relationship of CSR attitudes with the three diverse aspects of OC: affective OC, normative OC and continuance OC.

Design/methodology/approach

Comparisons are made via survey data obtained from 502 employees of two banks in Bangladesh using structural equation modeling analysis. The research instrument in four sections illustrates the most common measures in the literature used to evaluate the constructs and their interrelations according to the proposed conceptual model of the study.

Findings

The outcomes of the study reveal that there is a positive relationship between employee CSR attitudes, and both JS and OC. In addition to establishing a relationship between CSR attitudes and “Affective OC”, this study also found a relationship with “Normative OC”, which is less common in the existing literature.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the study mostly revolve around sample and social desirability. To further test the generalizability and cross-sectional validity of the outcomes, it is suggested that the proposed framework be tested in several other industrial/service sectors of developing countries.

Practical implications

The findings of the present research encourage companies in the developing world to adopt CSR practices to increase rates of JS and OC.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature on CSR and positive workplace outcomes, specifically in the developing world context. Additionally, and unlike past research, the results show the significant effect of employee CSR attitudes on both affective OC and normative OC.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Debbie Haski-Leventhal and Akriti Mehra

This study aims to extend existing research on impact measurement (IM) in social enterprises (SEs) by capturing, comparing and contrasting perceptions of IM in SEs in…

1662

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to extend existing research on impact measurement (IM) in social enterprises (SEs) by capturing, comparing and contrasting perceptions of IM in SEs in Australia and India.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was used to study five cases each in India and Australia. The SEs were identified using snowball and theoretical sampling, and grounded theory was applied to analyze the data.

Findings

Emerging perceptions of IM in both countries are described according to the development of the SE, its perceived impact and IM methods and challenges. Primary differences between India and Australia lie in perceptions of impact and IM, and related tools and processes. Similarities include understanding the importance of IM and the challenges faced. Signaling theory is used to depict how some SEs use IM to signal quality to their stakeholders and how information asymmetry can be reduced by measuring and reporting on IM.

Research limitations/implications

There is limited representation from developed and developing countries, and the snowball and theoretical sampling approaches used to identify SEs have limitations, including limited representation of SEs.

Practical implications

There is presently no standardized method of IM due to common challenges and perceived barriers. It is, therefore, important for SEs to work toward developing their own comprehensive IM methodology that is ingrained in strategy, applied on a regular basis and used to measure collective impact to increase sense of ownership and acceptability for employees and partners.

Originality/value

The paper brings the social entrepreneurs’ perspectives on measuring social impact while comparing these perspectives in one developing and one developed country.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Purpose-Driven University
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-283-6

Abstract

Details

The Purpose-Driven University
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-283-6

1 – 10 of 32